May 262017
 

– Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (1 report)
– Cliff Swallow (4 reports)
– Sedge Wren (1 report)
– Golden-winged Warbler (1 report)
– Blue-winged Warbler (1 report)
– Cape May Warbler (1 report)

———————————————
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Needs Alert for Peterborough County.The report below shows observations of species you have not seen in Peterborough County, based on your eBird observations. View or unsubscribe to this alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN34560
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 11:33 by Donald A. Sutherland
– CA-ON-Galway-Cavendish and Harvey-2378-2442 Charlie Allen Rd – 44.6462x-78.3916, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.646226,-78.391596&ll=44.646226,-78.391596
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37113123

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 17:29 by Iain Rayner
– Miller Creek Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3866915,-78.3501577&ll=44.3866915,-78.3501577
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37127129

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (12)
– Reported May 23, 2017 11:55 by Erica Nol
– Otonabee River North of Faryon Bridge, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3603104,-78.2895184&ll=44.3603104,-78.2895184
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37119763

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (16)
– Reported May 24, 2017 07:55 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37109708
– Comments: “collecting mud at edge of parking lot at Trailhead”

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (3)
– Reported May 23, 2017 15:25 by Brittany Holmes
– trent bridge, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3582738,-78.2898322&ll=44.3582738,-78.2898322
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37125957

Cliff Swallow building nest – Wikimedia

Sedge Wren (Cistothorus platensis) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 17:29 by Iain Rayner
– Miller Creek Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3866915,-78.3501577&ll=44.3866915,-78.3501577
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37127129
– Comments: “Same location as previous years w of second brige. Barely audible in distance not singing as frequently as later in evening”

Sedge Wren – Wikimedia

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (2)
– Reported May 24, 2017 10:29 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Tates Bridge–Tates Rd at Miskwaa Ziibi (river), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.64244,-78.40594&ll=44.64244,-78.40594
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37112322
– Media: 1 Photo

Male Golden-winged Warbler – Karl Egressy

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 06:10 by Jeff Stewart
– 621 Carveth Drive, Millbrook, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1354565,-78.4611087&ll=44.1354565,-78.4611087
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37108598
– Comments: “singing, cont. bird (?)”

Blue-winged Warbler – Wikimedia

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 07:55 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37109708

Cape May Warbler – Jeff Keller – May 5, 2015

May 212017
 

This past Tuesday, May 16, I got up early (6AM)….well early for me (I volunteer at the Turtle Trauma Centre and had a large recovered snapper to release in Orillia)…. threw open my drapes …..beautiful sunny morning……and thought someone had let their dog run free the other side of my fence…….wait, not a dog……a large, healthy Black Bear!!! This is the first bear I have ever seen in a natural setting!! My backyard is diagonal to the intersection of Fairbairn and Highland….so he came out of Jackson Park. Funny, I go to the trailer to see wildlife……but I probably see more here right in the city!

NOTE: Bears do enter Peterborough occasionally, but rarely hang around for more than a matter of hours. I’m not aware of anyone ever being attacked in one of these situations. The bears that very occasionally do attack (a handful of incidents across Ontario per year) are adult males in remote areas of Northern Ontario. It’s usually a bear that has never encountered humans before. Even mother bears with cubs rarely – if ever – attack. Why not? Because they don’t want to end up dead or injured and their cubs become orphaned and unable to survive on their own.   D.M.

Black Bear – Randy Therrien

May 212017
 

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (4)
– Reported May 20, 2017 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025248
– Media: 1 Photo

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (2)
– Reported May 20, 2017 09:50 by Bill Crins
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37019076
– Media: 2 Photos

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (5)
– Reported May 20, 2017 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025248
– Media: 1 Photo

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025248
– Comments: “brief flyover as I was leaving. Small, white tern with large, forked tail”

Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 07:57 by Scott Gibson
– Deer Bay Reach Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5740226,-78.2863426&ll=44.5740226,-78.2863426
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37002903
– Comments: “heard only but loud and close to road at 50km/h sign midway down hill. giving single hollow note calls in slow succession. not triplet calls of BBCU that i have had at this location in past. heard it distinctly 3-4 times.”

Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 15:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025783
– Comments: “near Lock 25, quick glimpse as it flew past. Long, black and white tail, cinnamon wings”

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 04:56 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Yard – Bear Creek Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5064687,-78.4726858&ll=44.5064687,-78.4726858
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37002257

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 13:20 by Richard Poort
– CA-Ontario-Tory Hill-West Eels Lake Road , Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.8991696,-78.1863274&ll=44.8991696,-78.1863274
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37017936

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025248

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (4)
– Reported May 20, 2017 15:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025783

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 05:44 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Elim Lodge Rd – Bear Creek, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5066833,-78.4694934&ll=44.5066833,-78.4694934
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37002256
– Comments: “Pure male singing ‘bee-bzz-bzz’ song in overgrown pasture. Different bird then one near sandy point.”

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 11:00 by Jeff Stewart
– 621 Carveth Drive, Millbrook, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1354565,-78.4611087&ll=44.1354565,-78.4611087
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37007726
– Comments: “heard while observing Brewster’s Warbler – full intact “beee-bzzzzz” song, assuming BWWA and not another Brewsters (?)”

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 09:15 by Richard Poort
– CA-Ontario-Tory Hill-272 Fire Route 73B , Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.8914459,-78.1682448&ll=44.8914459,-78.1682448
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37004804

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 11:57 by Luke Berg
– LHT–Drummond Line to Heritage Line, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.25411,-78.209913&ll=44.25411,-78.209913
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37011943

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 09:24 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Old Keene Road Marshes, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2596835,-78.2625957&ll=44.2596835,-78.2625957
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37003942

May 202017
 

The Bald Eagle nest on Third Island on Katchewanooka Lake is in good shape. However, the tree where the nest is located has been dead now for four years. I spotted two eaglets the first week of May being fed by the parents.

Kevin and Stacey Archer, Young’s Point Road

Eagle at nest on L. Katchewanooka – May 4, 2017 – Riley Archer

Two adult eagles with chick – May 4 – L. Katchewanooka – Riley Archer

May 202017
 

We caught this hungry little Black Bear with his hand in the cookie jar over the weekend of May 6. He came back to our place multiple times after the feeders were removed and settled on picking dandelions from the yard. I may have to provide him a salary after all the rainfall we have had this spring!

Nima Taghaboni, Deer Bay, Lower Buckhorn Lake

Black Bear – May 2017 – Nima Taghaboni

Black Bear at feeder – May 2017 – Nima Taghaboni

May 202017
 

On May 4, 5 and 6, I observed these Caspian Terns on the Indian River at Keene. They were north from the bridge on County Road 2, near where the Old Mill once stood. I managed to get a few photos, although from quite a distance. They look to be two pairs in breeding plumage. I was wondering if they are becoming more common in the area as I have never seen them before.

Shawn Whalen, Keene

Note: Caspian Terns are indeed becoming much more common in the Kawarthas and may be nesting here.

Caspian Terns – Keene – May 5, 2017 – Shawn Whalen

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 202017
 

On our morning walk on 6′ Bay Rd, Buckhorn, we came upon a freshly killed (runover) snake that I had never seen before. Not being fond of snakes, but not wishing it to be mutilated by more traffic, we moved it to the shoulder of the road, and took a couple of photos of it. It would appear to be an Eastern Milksnake. The milksnake is currently listed as a Species of  Special Concern under the Ontario Endangered Species Act, 2007 and Special Concern under the federal act.

Young Eastern Milksnake – Kingsley Hubbs

May 192017
 

Date: Thu, 18 May 2017 11:48:19 -0400
From: Festival of Birds <festivalofbirds2017@gmail.com>
To: ONTBIRDS <birdalert@ontbirds.ca>
Subject: [Ontbirds] Point Pelee NP Migration Report-May 18

Warm southerly breezes greeted birders today. Incoming migrants were not reported in large numbers but there were a few good pockets. About 15 species of warbler were reported. The most numerous species of warbler reported was CANADA.

The Tip had a good group of birds including CANADA, WILSON’S, BLACKPOLL WARBLERS, SCARLET TANAGER, INDIGO BUNTING, NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD, and a number of flycatcher species including EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE and OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER. One hike leader reported three vireo species (RED-EYED, PHILADELPHIA, and WARBLING) singing in one tree.

The PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS are continuing in their attempt to nest along the Woodland Nature Trail.

Tilden Woods had CERULEAN WARBLER, ACADIAN FLYCATCHER, NORTHERN PARULA, and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO.

Further north in the Cactus Field there was another OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER.

Other YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS were spotted on Redbud Trail and Woodland Nature Trail.

Good Birding,

Festival of Birds Hike Leaders
Pete Read, Karl Konze, Todd Pepper, Justin Peter, Jean Iron, Geof Burbidge, Emma Burbidge, Ian Shanahan, Chris Earley, Chris Coultier, Dave Milsom, Dave Jolly, James Lee, Tony Beck, Bruce DiLabio, Jessica Linton, Jody Allair and Paul Pratt.

The Festival of Birds runs from May 1 – 22. For a detailed schedule visit: www.festivalofbirds.ca

For highlights and other updates follow us at www.twitter.com/PointPeleeNP

The Festival is brought to you by Parks Canada – Point Pelee National Park and the Friends of Point Pelee. Hikes are generously supported by Quest Nature Tours. Shorebird Viewing Nights are brought to you in partnership with Ontario Field Ornithologists and Essex Region Conversation Authority and Pelee Wings Nature Store.

May 192017
 

Jacob Bowman, a 15 year old Peterborough high school student, is in Regina, Saskatchewan this week at the Canada Wide Science Fair (CWSF), presenting his research on the brook trout in Harper Creek. He qualified for the trip by winning the Peterborough Regional Science Fair last month.

Jacob’s project is called “Fish or chips? Brook trout in Harper Creek”. He has shown that the northern tributary of the creek, which runs along Rye St., has the highest quality trout habitat in the Harper Creek system. This is also the section that will be most affected by expansion of Rye St. The photo below shows Jacob’s CWSF presentation materials, including: a 5-page report on his research, his display poster, and a photograph of the material on display in Regina.

CONCLUSIONS OF JACOB’S RESEARCH

North Harper Creek had all of the components necessary for brook trout residence. It had the most stable temperature range of the sampled sections. Different food sources for fish were recorded. Brook trout were regularly observed in the creek and more fish were seen there than in any other section. Some of the other sections of the creek system exceeded the thermal tolerance level for brook trout (20°C). North Harper Creek’s temperature remained well within the tolerance level year round. Years ago the creek was altered to fit the growing developments in the area. During this process a steep grade that may impede fish passage was created at the mouth of North Harper Creek. Trout in the creek appear to be disconnected from the other sections of the creek system. North Harper Creek contains a small relic population of native brook trout that are at risk from development including the Rye St. expansion. If Rye St. expansion is to proceed, brook trout in North Harper Creek may be at risk without proper management. A plan will have to be devised to accommodate the trout. An underground stream running through culverts is not survivable for brook trout (Georig et al. 2016). They would have to move to other more suitable habitat or die. A better option would be to leave the creek were it is and begin some habitat enhancement, such as tree planting. If the creek must be moved, it is critical that it intercepts groundwater sources, since brook trout require groundwater for reproduction (Meisner 1990). It is very important that this last southern Ontario stronghold of brook trout be preserved for future generations and becomes an example of good stream conservation.”

via Jeff Bowman

Jacob Bowman sampling invertebrates in Harper Creek in January, 2016 – Jeff Bowman photo

Display of Jacob Bowman’s Brook Trout research – May 2017 – Jeff Bowman photo

May 192017
 

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (2)
– Reported May 18, 2017 08:23 by Luke Berg
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36955037

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2017 07:37 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36954352

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2017 08:41 by Mark Hecnar
– Peterborough–Trent University Wildlife Sanctuary Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3486498,-78.2882738&ll=44.3486498,-78.2882738
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36959374

Lincoln’s Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2017 05:56 by Paul Frost
– Peterborough–Omemee Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3076558,-78.3986695&ll=44.3076558,-78.3986695
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36953577

May 172017
 

*** Species Summary:

– Great Egret (1 report)
– Sora (1 report)
– Upland Sandpiper (1 report)
– Least Sandpiper (2 reports)
– Cliff Swallow (2 reports)
– Golden-winged Warbler (2 reports)
– Blue-winged Warbler (2 reports)
– Cape May Warbler (1 report)
– Clay-colored Sparrow (1 report)

———————————————
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Needs Alert for Peterborough County.The report below shows observations of species you have not seen in Peterborough County, based on your eBird observations. View or unsubscribe to this alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN34560
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Great Egret (Ardea alba) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 08:30 by Shauna Ryner
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36932252
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “Flying overhead, continued to fly over the neighboring farmer’s field.”

Sora (Porzana carolina) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 05:52 by Paul Frost
– airport road train tracks, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.25379,-78.36882&ll=44.25379,-78.36882
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36928667

Upland Sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 17:30 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Centre Line Rd Smith, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3788766,-78.3250377&ll=44.3788766,-78.3250377
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36947945
– Comments: “Sitting in field W of road. Have seen them at this location for last 3 years.”

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (5)
– Reported May 17, 2017 07:16 by Luke Berg
– 8 Line of Douro, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3831952,-78.2671595&ll=44.3831952,-78.2671595
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36928308
– Comments: “Feeding in small section of flooded field. Flushed by a tractor. ”

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (2)
– Reported May 17, 2017 17:10 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Towerhill Rd – flooded field near Sobeys, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.32657,-78.3439684&ll=44.32657,-78.3439684
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36948273

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (30)
– Reported May 17, 2017 11:45 by Matthew Garvin
– PTBO – Trent University Pedestrian Bridge, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3522914,-78.293066&ll=44.3522914,-78.293066
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36946035
– Media: 4 Photos

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 14:14 by Dan Chronowic
– Trent University – East Bank – North Parking Lots, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3606019,-78.2876408&ll=44.3606019,-78.2876408
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36938523

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (2)
– Reported May 17, 2017 08:00 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough–Hubble Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.53712,-77.9193&ll=44.53712,-77.9193
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36929472

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 09:09 by Luke Berg
– Sandy Lake Pine barrens/Sedge marshes, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.659557,-77.8931522&ll=44.659557,-77.8931522
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36934766

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 05:45 by Iain Rayner
– Bridgenorth–Brumwell St., Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3830019,-78.373848&ll=44.3830019,-78.373848
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36948113
– Comments: “Singing ‘bee-bee-bee-bzzzz’ song very rapidly. After ten minutes it came to trail edge and showed well. Pure male, yellow head and breast, black eyeline, greenback, blue wings with two white wing stripes. 50yards S of trailhead.”

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (2)
– Reported May 17, 2017 08:00 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough–Hubble Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.53712,-77.9193&ll=44.53712,-77.9193
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36929472

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 09:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Dufferin Cement Pond, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3172775,-78.3001506&ll=44.3172775,-78.3001506
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36940124

Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 14:20 by Matthew Tobey
– Cavan-Monaghan–Jones Quarter Line, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2567769,-78.5402148&ll=44.2567769,-78.5402148
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36940832
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Singing male.”

May 172017
 
This morning, May 17, I spied a tiny Painted Turtle on our paved path, very slowly making its way to the river.  This is the first time we’ve had an overwintering hatchling.  As I was taking it down to the river on my hand, it remained quite motionless unlike previous baby snappers that have hatched in the autumn.  As soon as those snappers got the scent of water, they raised their heads and started crawling from hand to hand to follow the scent.
Once at the river, I held the little one in my hand until it raised its head and showed some interest in its new watery surroundings.  Even after I put it on some sunny moss very near shallow water, it took at least another five or so minutes before it became active, then it slipped into the water.  Home at last!  I do hope it survives.
Stephenie Armstrong
Warsaw
May 162017
 

Orchard Oriole (Orchard) (Icterus spurius spurius) (1)
– Reported May 16, 2017 06:28 by Matthew Tobey
– Airport Rd- Railroad, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2521363,-78.37056&ll=44.2521363,-78.37056
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36904608
– Media: 2 Photos, 1 Audio
– Comments: “Singing male; Brown Line at the railroad tracks.”

Orchard Oriole (Orchard) (Icterus spurius spurius) (1)
– Reported May 16, 2017 19:24 by Luke Berg
– LHT Redmond Rd to Drummond Line , Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.262794,-78.249512&ll=44.262794,-78.249512
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36919613
– Comments: “Singing. A pair has been here for at least a week. ”

Male Orchard Oriole – Wikimedia

May 112017
 

I want to report a sighting of a Great Egret on May 10 southwest of Kirkfield. I believe the bird may be uncommon in this area.

Sue Mcintosh

Great Egret – Kirkfield – May 10, 2017 – Sue Mcintosh

 

May 102017
 

I have lived in the area for many years….and each year has a different flavour. Last week I noticed a large number of swallows (in the hundreds) flying near the Ennismore/Bridgenorth causeway. Each day they have been there swooping over and under cars, flying at windshields. Many are colliding with the vehicles and the tiny carcasses are becoming evident. I have never seen this before. Are they going through a resurgence? I feel badly about the mortalities that are occurring.

Barb Evett

Note: I suspect the swallows were feeding on midges, a small fly which emerges from lakes and rivers even at temperatures near O C. In cold weather in early spring, midges are the only food available for swallows, hence the large congregations over water. I don’t think there’s any resurgence in swallow populations unfortunately.

Tree Swallow – Karl Egressy

May 092017
 

Yesterday, May 8th, about 4pm, we witnessed something we have never seen before. Hundreds of dead or dying mayflies were floating downstream carried by the brisk current or were gathering in the stillness of our little bay. The local fish population were taking full advantage of the sudden bounty. I managed to scoop one insect up for photo identification and deposit it on the dock where to my surprise it soon recovered and started to crawl about. I’ve attached two of my pictures. This morning there is no sign of any Mayflies on the river at all.

I understand that mayflies usually swarm in June. If this is indeed the aftermath of a swarm, it would appear to be somewhat earlier than usual.

Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Note: According to Don Sutherland, a zoologist at the Natural Heritage Information Centre in Peterborough, “this mayfly appears to be Ephemerella subvaria. It is a widespread and abundant species with the period of emergence covering the month of May. The nymphs float to the surface and the adults emerge from the nymphal skin on the surface of the water (i.e. the surface tension keeps them afloat). As they emerge and take flight they are weak fliers, as the wings have not yet fully dried and hardened. This life state is termed the imago. The reference to fish gorging on them is interesting, as this species is a favourite among fly fishermen, who refer to it as the Hendrickson. Another mass emergence at the end of the month and the first half of June will be Ephemera simulans (Brown Drake) which has more patterned wings. The imagos will coat everything near water. There are in excess of 170 species of mayflies in Ontario; emergence and flight spans the entire year with some species emerging in early fall.”

Ephemerella subvaria mayflies on Indian River – May 8, 2017 -Stephenie Armstrong

Ephemerella subvaria Mayfly – Indian River – May 8, 2017 -Stephenie  Armstrong

 

May 052017
 

Today, May 5, I had a Rose-breasted Grosbeak on my feeder. An American bittern has been in the wetland near our house since at least since April 26. Also, I saw my first Yellow Warbler on May 3. I have my hummingbird feeders out, but nothing yet.

Yellow Warbler (Karl Egressy)

Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak – May 5, 2016 – Trudy Gibson –

American Bittern – Don Pettypiece

 

May 052017
 

Although it has been several weeks since hearing of any still around, Ed & Karen Heuvel reported to me a Great Gray Owl they had seen during the early evening on their property along the Ouse River between Cottesloe and Norwood on April 18,

2017. Ed says; “Huntng from a low snag, it seemed quite tame. After a while, it sailed across the road and came to land on another snag. In the dimming light, it’s white mustache marks were quite distinct.”

Stoney Lake and area

Broad-winged Hawks seemed to show some early arrival dates this year, with the first I know of seen on Stoney Lake on April 12th. They, Red-shouldered Hawks, Merlins, and Ospreys are quite abundant now in the area as they engage in their nesting activities for another year.

The first Whip-poor-will I heard this spring was one singing on the evening of April 24th near South Bay on Stoney Lake.

On April 29th, an Eastern Phoebe was sitting on a full clutch of five eggs in her nest atop a horizontal deck support beam at a friend’s cottage off of Northey’s Bay Road.

Stoney, Belmont, and Cordova Lake area

Northern Barred Owls are very vocal right now, day and night, and we are at the time of year when most of them will have young in the nest, (averaging about a week old). Typically, in this area, many lay their eggs about the 25th of March. Usually quiet throughout the incubation period, the males, especially, begin frequent hooting again towards the end of April. I wonder if that has anything to do with early social imprinting of their youngsters?

Tim Dyson

Barred Owl – March 23, 2017 – Sandy Lake – Susan

Whip-poor-will (Karl Egressy)

Great Gray Owl – Tim Dyson

Broad-winged Hawk – Wikimedia

Red-shouldered Hawk – Karl Egressy

Eastern Phoebe at nest – David Frank

Eastern Phoebe nest – June 7, 2004 – Tim Dyson

May 032017
 

We were at the Ecology Park on the morning of April 23 and saw this male Yellow-rumped Warbler.  Hallelujah for the return of spring!  Helen and Larry Keller, Mark Street

Yellow-rumped Warbler – Ecology Park – April 23, 2017 – Helen & Larry Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have had a little Chipping Sparrow flying up against our windows over the last 3 days. It sits on the window sills and sliding door frames looking in and sometimes flies at the windows. We would love to know what might be causing this weird behaviour. We’ve also had a male Hairy Woodpecker coming to our feeder. Wendy Marrs, Peterborough

Chipping Sparrow at window – Wendy Marrs

Hairy Woodpecker – Wendy Marrs

 Note: The bird see its reflection in the window, assumes it’s another male in its territoy, and flies up against the window to drive the intruder (its reflection) away. Robins and cardinals often do the same thing. D.M

 

 

 

On April 14th we were sitting on our dock and our neighbour saw a big bird flying to a tree.  We got our spotting scope out and found that there were two Great Blue Herons in a nest in a clump of five pine trees. Later, we discovered that there are actually three nests! Even though we see lots of herons, it is the first time we actually found a nest.  Rosemary and Claudio Rosada, Lower Buckhorn Lake

Great Blue Heron (Paul Anderson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was so excited to see a Ruby-crowned Kinglet in the brushy trees near our house this morning (April 13) -just classic and unmistakable. It had a white eye ring and white wing bars, and he even showed a bit of red on the crown just to be sure!  Jane Bremner, Warsaw

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet has a prominent eye ring. (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Got some great pictures of Ring-necked Ducks and Trumpeter Swans around Lakefield on April 11. Jeff Keller

Ring-necked Ducks – April 11, 2017 – Jeff Keller

Trumpeter Swans – April 11, 2017 – Jeff Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mid-April is my favourite time to be on the island. Silence and not a light to be seen. Today the River Otters were out in force. Running, sliding and feasting on fish.The highlight was a flyby of three swans (Trumpeters?) that were in the duckpond.  Life is good!  Rob Welsh, Stony Lake

River otter eating a fish at Gannon’s Narrows, Buckhorn Lake (by Kinsley Hubbs)

 

 

Stony Lake – April 10, 2017 – Rob Welsh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On April 4, there were 2 Osprey on the nesting platform in Young’s Point. Most of Stony Lake is still frozen but there were pair of absolutely resplendent loons dancing and calling.  Rob Welsh, Stony Lake

Common Loon (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apr 272017
 

On April 26, I was extremely surprised and excited to hear a Whip-poor-will calling from the field out behind our house (7th Line Smith & Peacock St. area in Selwyn Township …. near the Otonabee River).  It was about 8:45 pm when I heard it, and it “sang” it’s classic repeating call for about 5 minutes (stopping for a couple short breaks).  It was a lovely mild evening…a couple bats were flying over our backyard, full choruses of spring peepers and chorus frogs were coming from a nearby wetland, a woodcock was peenting and flying around the field, and even some wild turkeys were gobbling from their nearby roost!  This was our first time ever hearing a Whip-poor-will in our area.

 

Whip-poor-will (Karl Egressy)

Whip-poor-will (on ground) and Common Nighthawk flying above – Wikimedia

 

Apr 262017
 

The ice left Stoney Lake on April 12 this year, which is a little earlier than I had anticipated this year. I have included the dates of freeze-up and ice-out for the past few years. I know I have older records and will send them along. Freeze-up in 2015 was an anomaly as the lake didn’t freeze until into 2016. In 2002 or 2003 we had a somewhat similar freeze-up – the difference being that Northey’s Bay had frozen in late December, but the main lake stayed open until about the 15th of January. Dennis Johnson, Northey’s Bay Road

Year   Freeze-up           Ice-out
2017     TBD                     12-Apr
2016     15-Dec                 01-Apr
2015     5-Jan, 2016         17-Apr

2014     13-Dec                  24-Apr
2013     13-Dec                  20-Apr
2012     26-Dec                  23-Mar
2011      27-Dec                 15-Apr
2010     09-Dec                  02-Apr
2009     13-Dec                  13-Apr
2004     14-Dec                  18-Apr

Tundra Swans on ice on Pigeon Lake – March 5, 2017 – photo by Rick and Marge Decher

Apr 262017
 

On the afternoon of April 23, Sylvia and I went for a walk in the Trent Wildlife Sanctuary. When up on the drumlin, where the Tree Swallow boxes are, we met two young women birders who said they had just seen what they thought was a Northern Mockingbird. Almost on command the bird appeared and flew away from us. My first for the County. Who said the Wildlife Sanctuary never had any interesting birds! That semi-open area is perfect mockingbird habitat, and I’ll be checking to see if it stays around.    Jim Cashmore, Peterborough

Northern Mockingbird – Gord Mallory

 

 

 

Apr 142017
 

Spring is springing forth at a rapid pace now – hard to keep up! I was so excited to see a Ruby-crowned Kinglet in the brushy trees near our house this morning -just classic and unmistakable -white eye ring and white wing bars, and he even showed a bit of red on the crown just to be sure! When he sang, I thought I was hearing a much bigger bird.

Jane Bremner, Warsaw

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet has a prominent eye ring. (Karl Egressy)

Apr 062017
 

Happy spring! Today, April 4, there were 2 Osprey on the nesting platform in Young’s Point.  Most of Stony is still frozen but there were pair of absolutely resplendent Common Loons dancing and calling. Rob Welsh, Stoney Lake 

This morning, April 5, I heard my first Common Loon (Upper Buckhorn Lake near Six Foot Bay).  I thought I heard one a couple of days ago, but sure this time. Antonia Sinclair, Buckhorn

Ospreys on Selwyn Road – Jeff Keller

Common Loon (Karl Egressy)

Apr 032017
 

My wife, Mathilde, spotted a Virginia Opossum in our backyard on the evening of March 24 at around 9:30. We saw the white face and body by the light from our livingroom windows. It
was eating a pomegranate that she had set out for some robins.

Ralph Colley

Opossum on Johnston Drive, south of Peterborough – Mary Beth Aspinall – Feb. 2014

Apr 032017
 

On March 23 at about 5 pm, I used a hooting call to lure in this fabulous Barred Owl. To our surprise, a female also showed up. They quickly mated, and then hung around for a bit before going their separate ways. We were in the vicinity of Sandy Lake

Susan

Barred Owl – March 23, 2017 – Sandy Lake – Susan