Oct 232019
 

Leucistic American Robin:  This “Hallowe’en ghost robin” was eating berries in our yard.  Fred and Marg Forster, Keene  (Note: Leucism refers to a lack of normal colour pigments in the feathers. D.M.)

Leucistic American Robin – Oct. 30, 2019 – Fred and Mara Forster , Keene

Saw-whet Owl banding – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (3)
– Reported Oct 29, 2019 18:20 by Matt Mair
– James McLean Oliver Ecological Centre, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) (3)
– Reported Oct 28, 2019 09:00 by Dave Milsom
– Havelock–Sewage Lagoons (no access), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “continuing”

Lesser yellowlegs – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Oct 29, 2019 07:15 by Ben Taylor
– Wilson Line, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Heard hooting off to the south.”

Horned Lark (by Karl Egressy)

Great Horned Owl – Dec. 23, 2015 – Glen Grills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) (4)
– Reported Oct 23, 2019 08:39 by Matthew Tobey
– Briar Hill Bird Sanctuary, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Orange-crowned Warbler (Leiothlypis celata) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2019 12:20 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–300 Water St to Edgewater Blvd Loop, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “No doubt, seen well from 5 feet away, along river, upstream of pedestrian bridge. Dull green all over, including belly and undertail coverts, faint streaks on breast, half eye-arcs and faint supercilium.”

Orange-crowned Warbler by Karl Egressy

Mute Swans – Sept. 26, 2016 – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) (2)
– Reported Oct 22, 2019 09:20 by Chris Risley
– Lakefield Marsh, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Continuing birds.”

Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)
– Reported Oct 20, 2019 14:40 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “Female”

Male and female Canvasbacks – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)
– Reported Oct 20, 2019 14:40 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60824207
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “Female”

Jul 242017
 

Today, July 22, at the Nonquon lagoons in Port Perry, there was an interesting mix of life and death struggles. Lots of sights of successful breeding as Mallards, Wood Ducks, Hooded Mergansers and Trumpeter Swans showed off their new families. Very few shorebirds but the habitat is still not good for them ? Water is too high.

However two Soras were in full song and a Virginia Rail showed off her two offspring. 5 Common Gallinules and an American Coot were new arrivals as they haven’t been here all summer. The show stopper was the feeding frenzy by the Cedar Waxwings. Fifteen+ birds were feeding at eye to ground level chasing and catching a huge new hatch of bluet damselflies. For the dragonfly/damselfly afficionados out there this is the time be here .. crazy numbers of these insects. Also a large hatch of Monarchs must have occurred as they were everywhere.

Sora (rail) – Wikimeda

Lots of herps – Midland Painted Turtles, Northern Leopard Frogs, Green Frogs and my second (dead) Red-bellied Snake at this site this year. Lots of other butterflies and myriad other insects to amuse. A groundhog and a muskrat represented the mammal clan. Adjacent fields had several Lesser Yellowlegs, Killdeer and Spotted Sandpipers – so they are here .. you just gotta look further afield.

Geoff Carpentier
Avocet Nature Services

(via Ontbirds – Bird Alert – Click here for information on how to subscribe to alerts)

DIRECTIONS: The lagoons are located one road north of the transfer site on Concession Rd. 8 [don’t get confused as, despite the fact that these roads are both numbered “8”, they are two different roads – one is a regional paved road, the other a dirt concession road.]. Access to the lagoons is from the east end of Conc. 8 only as the bridge is out west of the lagoons. Please remember to close the gate behind if you go as it is not self-closing.

How to Obtain a Nonquon Sewage Lagoon Permit

Permits must be purchased in advance of entering the lagoons. Permits can be obtained from 605 Rossland Rd., Whitby, or at the Scugog Waste Transfer Station, 1623 Reach Street, Port Perry. An electronic version of the Nonquon Sewage Lagoon Birder Permit is available in PDF format at http://www.durham.ca/finance.asp?nr=/departments/finance/financeinside.htm. Nonquon Sewage Lagoon Birder Permits are available for $10 per permit. Cheques will only be accepted at Regional Headquarters. Payment by cash only at the Scugog Waste Transfer Station. Completed Applications should be forwarded to: Finance Department – Insurance & Risk Management, 605 Rossland Road E., Whitby, ON L1N 6A3

 

Aug 082016
 

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (5)
– Reported Aug 07, 2016 07:21 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Otonabee Gravel Pit, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Think the Juveniles have started to show up.”

Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) (1)
– Reported Aug 07, 2016 07:21 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Otonabee Gravel Pit, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “Juvi(although crisp white edging to feathers doesn’t show up in pics), hanging out with 2 LESA. Blackish legs, thick beak, greyer overall(not a rich brown) with more obvious supercilium and just a small about of buff around breast.”

Iain also observed Killdeer, Solitary Sandpiper, Spotted Sandpiper and Lesser Yellowlegs at the same location/same day.

Least Sandpiper - Wikimedia

Least Sandpiper – Wikimedia

Semipalmated Sandpipers - Drew Monkman

Semipalmated Sandpipers – Drew Monkman