Aug 312019
 

White-throated Sparrows arrive on schedule: Right on schedule, five White-throated Sparrows arrived in our backyard this morning, the first of the fall. Some years, several dozen are here at the same time. They enjoy the finch mix (millet, nyger, sunflower seeds) I scatter on the ground each spring and fall. I expect the sparrows to stay for about a month. In the coming days, I’ll be watching for White-crowned Sparrows, Fox Sparrows, and Dark-eyed Juncos to join them in the yard. Drew Monkman, Maple Crescent, Peterborough

Juncos and White-throated Sparrows feeding on ground – (photo by Drew Monkman)

White-throated sparrow (dark stripe colour phase) (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharing a milkweed leaf: I’m sending along a photo of a scene from August 31 that intrigued me. These Monarch and Milkweed Tussock Moth caterpillars were feeding on the same leaf. I watched them for a few minutes and at times they even seemed to face each other in an unfriendly fashion but then just turned away continuing to eat! Gwen McMullen

Monarch and Milkweed Tussock Moth caterpillars eating together – Gwen McMullen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria) (3)
– Reported Sep 24, 2019 15:49 by Andrew Brown
– Otonabee Gravel Pit Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Looks like yellowlegs but smaller with greenish legs. Seen bobbing its tail similar to a spotted sandpiper ”

Solitary Sandpiper (Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Egret (Ardea alba) (1)
– Reported Sep 14, 2019 10:46 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough Landfill Wetland Project ponds, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “sontinuing, 150 m SW of pond along marsh edge”

Great Egrets south of zoo (Michele Hemery)

Great Egret (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) (1)
– Reported Sep 09, 2019 16:38 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough—Maria St. to Water St., Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Roosting in tree along lakes edge, where train tracks meet Maria St.”

Black-crowned Night heron – Carl Welbourn – May 7, 2019

Black-crowned Night Heron – juvenile – August 28, 2017 – Carl Welbourn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Butternut crop at Road’s End Farm:  As you noted several years ago, we do have a Butternut tree quite near our farm, although it is quite old and the bottom branches are succumbing to old age.  Two years ago it had a massive crop of butternuts, none last year, and some have already fallen this year although it could be that it’s too early to count the falls as ready to harvest. We also have at least one Butternut two fields over from the house, which has already dropped a great number of nuts and we’ve collected them.

I mention all of this because you or someone you might have contact with would like to have these nuts.  Both of us have hand/shoulder injuries which preclude this action for us and we would be glad to let someone else have the harvest, if and when it is ready(?) and the pile which is already down and I guess should be attended to right away…or left for squirrels?

We have a good apple showing this year after none last year, both in the back yard on the Macintosh. Also, lots of fruit on the Choke Cherry trees. As for the Wild Grape abundance…it’s quite overwhelming.  Dog Strangling Vine continues to spread all around the unploughed parts of our land each year. On the good side, we’ve seen more Monarchs this year than ever before.  Yes, we have a lot of Milkweed. We …choke?  pin?  Darienne McAuley

Nuts of Butternut – Juglans_cinerea – Necrasov (Wikimedia)

Butternut leaves and bark – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (1)
– Reported Sep 04, 2019 13:39 by Matthew Tobey
– Peterborough Airport area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Least Sandpiper – Wikimedia

Semipalmated Plover – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus) (1)
– Reported Sep 03, 2019 12:02 by Matthew Tobey
– Peterborough Airport area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (1)
– Reported Sep 02, 2019 08:37 by Dave Milsom
– Chase Memorial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59456290
– Comments: “Gave whinny call 2 times in response to playback.”

Eastern Screech-owl – Beaches area of Toronto – via Jamie Brockley

Cape May Warbler – Lakefield Sewage Lagoons – Sept. 2, 2019 – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
– Reported Sep 01, 2019 06:36 by Iain Rayner
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feb 152017
 

Today, February 15,  I was at band practice at Living Hope Church on Lansdowne St. east beside the OPP building. There are 12 crab apple trees in front of the church and I counted 5-6 American Robins in each tree. That’s a lot of robins in one spot.! They were in a feeding frenzy.  Ron Craig

Today, February 15, I had 18 American Robins in my yard. They have been eating the apples from my flowering crab tree, which for some reason didn’t all drop in the fall. I have been throwing out dried cranberries and read on the Internet that they also will eat small pieces of apples, soaked raisins and possibly pieces of oranges.  Is there anything else I can put out for them? I am usually lucky to have two robins in the summer so this is such a treat to have so many! Also, the man who snowblows my driveway said he saw about 100 American Robins near the Holiday Inn on February 12.   Marg Byer, Chamberlain St., Peterborough

NOTE: You may want to try putting out mealworms. D.M.

Today, February 13, I had 9 American Robins feeding on berries in my mountain-ash trees. Nick Chaggares, MacDonald St., Peterborough

I saw this tree full of mostly American Robins when I was out walking on Dublin St. They were feeding on a mountain-ash tree across the road.  When I first passed the mountain-ash, I counted 25 robins feeding. So much for flying south.   Ron Craig

Mostly robins in tree on Dublin Street – Feb. 12, 2017, Ron Craig

Well who knew? We were walking through Beavermead Park near the campgrounds on February 6, when we saw a multitude of birds – over 30 – that we at first did not recognize. We were surprised once we realized it was a flock of American Robins Helen and Larry Keller

American Robins feeding on Wild Grape – Beavermead Park – Feb. 7, 2016 – Helen & Larry Keller –

Today, February 7, we noticed at least 30 American Robins feasting on crabapples in our backyard. We have seen one or two robins in the crabapple tree over the years but never a small flock.  Jim Falls, Peterborough (west end)

Today, February 7, I saw at least 30 American Robins feeding in trees along the road off of Clonsilla Avenue that leads to the Dollarama / HomeSense parking lot. Michelle Monkman

At about 4:35 pm on February 6,  I noticed about 60 American Robins in my backyard treeline. I used to race pigeons so I’m pretty good at counting the number of birds in a flock! LOL   Gavin Hunter, Omemee

I live near the corner of Monaghan Road and Charlotte Street in Peterborough and saw a flock of ‘huge’ American Robins this morning. Quite round in shape! Sarah Thompson, Hazeldean Ave.

I continue to have a very large flock of American Robins and European Starlings feeding in the crab apple tree. Yesterday, Feb. 3, there were 4 dozen + robins and well over 100 starlings. With the flock was 1 Cedar Waxwing and 1 Bohemian Waxwing. Also, one of the robins was leusistic but it flew off before I could get a picture. There were birds everywhere!  Sue Paradisis, Tudor Crescent

Robins & Bohemian Waxwing in crab apple tree – Feb. 4, 2016 – Sue Paradisis

We have a flock of at least 50 American Robins showing up the last 3 days at our place on Chemong Lake, north of Fowlers Corners. Bob Hancock

We have a flock of at least 20 to 30 American Robins in our European Mountain-ash. Some waxwings, too. Rob Tonus, Farmcrest Avenue

I had 12 American Robins feeding on European Buckthorn berries in the tree behind my house on February 4. Drew Monkman, Maple Crescent, Peterborough

This morning, I had 25-30 American Robins feeding in my crab apple trees. Brad Gillen, Montcalm Drive, Peterborough

As of February 4, there are quite a few American Robins at 879 Parkhill Road west in Peterborough. Do you have any idea of what to feed them?   Cliff Mccollow

Note:  The robins will do just fine without feeding them at all. There is abundant wild food around this year, especially wild grape, mountain-ash berries, winterberry holly, crabapple and European buckthorn.  However, you could try putting out some raisins that have been softened by soaking them in water. Personally, I’ve never tried feeding them. D.M.

Dec 202016
 

I was very surprised to see a pair of Eastern Bluebirds in my garden this morning, December 18, at about 9.30 a.m. The male was sitting on top of the clothesline pole and the female was on the line itself. I live near Warsaw and often have bluebirds nesting in the spring and summer. However, this is the first time that I have seen them so late in the season and I worry that they won’t survive. Is this unusual?

Rachel Burrows, Warsaw

Note: Some bluebirds overwinter in the Kawarthas most years. Thanks to the huge wild fruit crop this year – especially Wild Grape – they should be able to find all they food they need. The cold is not an issue for birds, as long as they get enough to eat. D.M.

A pair of Eastern Bluebirds - male at upper right - Wikimedia

A pair of Eastern Bluebirds – male at upper right – Wikimedia

An Eastern Bluebird visiting a heated birdbath in winter - Kevin Williams

An Eastern Bluebird visiting a heated birdbath in winter – Kevin Williams