Jun 242017
 

We have a sweet smelling Abelia shrub that is proving to be very popular with the insect population. Visitors this month include our first and so far only Monarch, a Black Swallowtail, a White Admiral, and two hawk moths, including the Hummingbird Clearwing and the Snowberry Clearwing, the latter new to us. And out amongst the wildflowers, the Canada Tiger Swallowtail is regularly feeding on the Viper’s Bugloss. I was able to photograph them all except the Monarch, with two separate views of the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth.

On June 8th, Peter got a bit of a surprise opening the door to our under-deck to find an Eastern Milksnake coiled around one of the garden hoses. He was lucky to get a photo as it made its way along the line of stopcocks heading for a bit of cover under the stairs.

Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Eastern Milksnake – Peter Armstrong

Snowberry Clearwing at Abelia shrub – Stephenie Armstrong – June 2017

Hummingbird Clearwing at Abelia shrub – Stephenie Armstrong

 

Canada Tiger Swallowtail on Viper Bugloss – Stephenie Armstrong

Jun 212016
 

I went out early both Saturday and Sunday (June 18 and 19, 2016) on Lower Buckhorn lake and took these pictures.

Robin Blake

Wild Rose - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Wild Rose – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

White Admiral -June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

White Admiral -June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

White Admiral -June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake (9)

White Admiral -June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake (9)

Slaty Skimmer - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Slaty Skimmer – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Osprey - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Osprey – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Northern Water Snake - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Northern Water Snake – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Four-spotted Skimmer - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Four-spotted Skimmer – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Eastern Kingbird - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Eastern Kingbird – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Canada Geese - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Canada Geese – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Blue Flag - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Blue Flag – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Bald Eagle - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Bald Eagle – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Apr 262016
 

On April 14, at around 4:00 PM, I stopped at the corner of Woodland Drive and the Lakefield Highway because the spring peepers, chorus and leopard frogs were calling. I walked to the edge of the water on the north side of Woodland. I was standing on the shoulder of the road looking at the water when I glanced down and discovered that I was surrounded by several slowly untangling garter snake mating balls. With all the traffic noise and vibrations, I caught them off guard. I was afraid they would head out on the road and be run over so I slowly stepped back. As soon as I did they quickly fled down holes in the shoulder of the road that I had been standing on.

Sue Paradisis

Mating ball of garter snakes - Wikimedia

Mating ball of garter snakes – Wikimedia

Eastern Garter Snake - Joe Crowley

Eastern Garter Snake – Joe Crowley

Sep 192014
 

A visiting dog alerted us to something of interest under a parked truck, and upon investigation, we found an adult Eastern Hog-nosed Snake. The top was dark in colour with definite black blotches behind the eyes, and the belly was yellow. It had the unmistakable “nose” and used its protection techniques of coiling and hissing loudly at us. It attempted to strike out when prodded with a broom handle (it wasn’t hurt in any way, by the dog or us!). It had a very thick body, and although coiled for most of our observation, it appeared to be 3-4 feet in length. Our interactions with it were captured in video on a cell phone.

Our property includes the shore of the Indian River and a marsh, so there are lots of sources of frogs, toads, voles, etc for food. We’ve never seen this species here before, so it was probably a lucky, if rare, observation.

Jane Bremner, Sawmill Road,

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake  (Joe Crowley)

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake (Joe Crowley)

Douro-Dummer

Jun 042014
 

I was working in a friend’s garden at his farm on Settlers Line near Keene this afternoon, June 4. I moved a plastic bag of manure I’d laid over another bag last fall and found a snake I’d never seen before, under the top bag. I’ve looked it up and it was a Red-bellied Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata). It was curled up when I found it, totally immobile. It was as thick as a pencil at its mid-point and was, I estimated, about 12″ long. It was a beautiful light brown with ridges of tiny white dots down its entire length. It had a very distinctive oval white mark at the nape of its neck. Its underside was a lightish, rose-red colour. It made no movement whatsoever while I was there. I had to get on with my work and when I came back to the spot 10 minutes later, it had gone. I see from Reptiles and Amphibians of Ontario that it’s fairly frequently seen – but this was a first for me.

Ron Mackay, Settlers Line

Red-bellied Snake

Red-bellied Snake – Drew Monkman

May 072014
 

This Northern Watersnake took a little break on our lawn on May 4. We are right beside a large marsh area along the Indian River, so we suspect it might have been going from a rock crevice or leaf litter toward the water. Anyway, it was very calm and let us take a good look. It was about a metre long.

Northern Watersnake  - Jane Bremner

Northern Watersnake – Jane Bremner

Jane Bremner
Sawmill Road
Douro-Dummer, ON