Dec 082017
 

N.B. Whenever I refer to “home”, it is between Warsaw and Lakefield, south of the Sawer Creek Wetland.

Passerines and other birds and animals.

  • A Yellow-billed Cuckoo flew over my kayak as I began to paddle up the Indian River from Back Dam Park at Warsaw on September 9th. It called twice upon landing across the river.
  • This was the last date I saw the Great Egret that I had originally discovered there on August 5th.
  • Two Red Crossbills were also seen and heard a little way up the river on that day, and others were seen and/or heard several times over the course of the fall at Warsaw, at home, and spots around Stoney Lake, Northey’s Bay Road, and Nepthon. No real “flocks” as yet, but birds numbered from one to six individuals when encountered. Most recent were six at home on December 5th.
  • An American Pipit was skulking about in a pasture south of Long Lake, NW of Warsaw, on September 28th.
  • Pine Siskins have been occasional from early October to present. With the exception of 40+ birds seen near Warsaw on November 22nd, (and not unlike the crossbills that have been around), siskin numbers remain rather low.
  • On October 26th, at Nephton Ridge, I saw my last Monarch of the year. It was #532 for 2017, which is more than double my previous highest annual count since I began counting them seven years ago. Of the 532, 31 were observed as road fatalities.
  • Also on October 26th, I heard a Greater Yellowlegs call before dawn from the starry sky above at home, and another near Nephton Ridge later that morning.
  • One Tundra Swan with nine Canada Geese was seen flying overhead at home on October 27th, 28th and 30th. A lone Tundra Swan flew over the same location on November 2nd. I wondered if it was the one who had been flying with the nine geese?
  • On September 24th, I stepped out of dense cedars into a pasture and found myself very close to two Sandhill Cranes. They seemed at ease as long as I stayed in motion, just walking about as they were. Whenever I stopped or crouched, they moved away from me.

  • The loud calling of just over 300 Sandhill Cranes in two groups on Nov. 17th was heard as the birds were heading westward over my house. I photographed each entire flock at wide angle so I could later zoom the images on the computer and get an exact count. The first flock at 2:13pm numbered 173 birds and the second group four minutes later contained 128 for a combined total of 301 cranes. These birds were very likely the same, or associated with the large groups that Bill Buddle had reported at about 2:30pm the same day over Lakefield.

  • Ed Heuvel and I saw a much smaller flock of seven birds over his house between Cottesloe and Norwood on Nov. 23rd.
  • No doubt due to the warmth of early December, two Eastern Chipmunks were seen running across Round Lake Road north of Havelock on December 4th. They had all but disappeared not too long ago, and I’ve now seen five back out just this month.
  • Another warm weather sighting was of a Leopard Frog hopping across the yard at home on December 5th. I took some photos, and half an hour later, it was nowhere to be found.

  • On December 8th 2017, Ed Heuvel reported a road-killed Virginia Opossum he had just seen along Hwy 7 south of Sherbrooke Street.

   Raptors of interest

  • On September 11th, an immature Peregrine appeared amidst twenty-four kettling Turkey Vultures NW of Warsaw. The falcon harassed a couple of the vultures before peeling off on its own, heading SW.

  • As is my habit if I am out in the yard after dark during the fall or winter, I called for owls. From about the 24th of September until about the 3rd of November, Saw-whet Owls move about during their annual fall migration. The first that responded to my calls this year was a single bird on September 29th. On October 18th, however, no less than four of the little owls showed up inside of about a minute of my first attempt at calling. One was in the spruces to the east of the yard, while the other three were surrounding me, within the small grove of apple trees where I stood. With the three of them looking at each other more than at me, I found it easy to take some photos of the two that were closest to me, (about two metres away).
  • Dates later than the average “end date” of their normal migration that I have called one in this year have been November 8th, 12th, 27th and December 1st. These likely represent one or more wintering birds, and all have been at home near Warsaw.

  • Ed Heuvel flushed a Short-eared Owl from the ground on the morning of Oct. 17th on his 40 acre property NW of Norwood while out for a walk with his dog. Ed has turned what was once a sloping old field into a thriving tallgrass prairie, having seeded it with many native prairie plant species. I thought it quite fitting for such a bird to turn up in this “new” prairie grassland habitat. Good one, Ed!!
  • Paddling up the Indian River from Back Dam again on October 21st, Angela and I saw a few good raptors during our time on the water. First was an immature Northern Goshawk flying overhead, and then, about two minutes later, an immature Cooper’s Hawk following almost the exact same “path”. A while later, paddling back downstream, Angela spotted an adult male Merlin as it perched in the dead top branches of a spruce. Driving back through Warsaw, a Red-tailed Hawk soared low over the village. We headed up Payne’s Line towards home and spotted the first Golden Eagle of the season (a sub-adult bird) slowly soaring not far from the large metal tower there. We took a few photos and headed home. The next day, I saw another (immature this time) Golden Eagle fly over, east to west, from the yard at home.

  • I was accompanied by three friends, (Drew Monkman, Martin Parker, and Ed Heuvel) on Oct. 26th for a few hours of raptor watching in the Nephton Ridge/Kosh Lake area at the east end of County Road #6. My one intent for the day was to point out to Drew, his first “Ontario” Golden Eagle. Well, unless the “eagle sp.” we saw that morning was a Golden, we did not see one. However, we were treated to 8 Bald Eagles which, apart from one 4th winter bird, all were adults. At one point, four adult Balds soared together directly overhead. A while later, two adults came along together, and after that, another by itself. Since there was such a lack of immature eagles, and the fact that four adults had come from different directions, soared a while together, and then dispersed somewhat northward… we questioned how many of them might have actually even been migrants, or perhaps local breeding birds. Additional raptors for the day were five Red-tailed Hawks, and two (one adult and one immature) Red-shouldered Hawks.

  • Just after 11:00am on Nov. 11th a group of large birds caught my eye to the north of the house. On closer inspection, I could see three Common Ravens dive-bombing an immature Golden Eagle. I watched them for several minutes before the ravens went east and the eagle, west.

  • On October 29th a dark morph Rough-legged Hawk was seen perched in a tree along County Rd #6 just west of Camp Line. It was the first of the season for me, and since, I’ve seen another eight Rough-legs between Norwood and Lakefield. Of the nine seen so far, three have been dark morph birds.
  • Having had seen no immature Bald Eagles during the autumn season as yet, on the morning of Nov. 17th, two 1st winter birds, and then a 2nd winter bird appeared soaring over my yard in a ten-minute period. They all seemed to come from the west, and once a considerable altitude was reached, they each headed off in completely different directions. I suspect that they had all spent some time feeding together, and were now dispersing. It was only two days after the annual rifle deer hunt had ended, and I wondered if they had just dined on the gut pile of a deer left somewhere by hunters.
  • The great backyard birding continued on November 26th, as no sooner had I sat in the yard with my morning coffee, an immature Northern Goshawk flew from east to west. If that wasn’t enough, my fourth Golden Eagle of the season (an adult) appeared over the forest to the east, soared two circles, and headed back east just after noon.
  • Nov. 29th an adult rufous morph Red-tailed Hawk soared over the yard. I had to run in and get the scope as it looked not like a typical Red-tail. The rusty-red undersides and the dark brown back were easily seen with the optics. It had been a long time since I’ve seen this variety of the species.
  • On the night of December 01 – 02, after calling at home for Screech, Saw-whet, and Boreal Owls, (the latter, because you never know if you don’t try), I finally stirred an Eastern Screech Owl who called for quite a while afterwards. And briefly, a Northern Saw-whet Owl answered my calls with the “tew, tew, tew” call. About an hour later, just after mid-night, while bringing in some firewood, the pair of Northern Barred Owls that live on the property year-round, began calling with hoots which soon morphed into their monkey-like “whacka, whacka, whacka” calls. Not too bad for spending a little time in the yard after dark!!
  • Just after 2:00pm on December 6th, I saw a large, pale bird far out to the east, soaring in wide circles. It appeared gull-like as it moved quite fast in the strong winds. I got the scope on it just before it passed in behind the treetops and out of my view. Revealed by the scope was the darkish under-body contrasting with entirely white undersides of the wings of an immature Snowy Owl. Unless my memory is misfiring, this would be the first of this species I have seen this century. If that wasn’t enough stimulation for one day, a little over an hour later, I saw a second Snowy for the day as it flew into strong south winds at 3:15pm. The latter bird was decidedly whiter than the first, with very few dark markings. The first bird simply would not show up in the photos I took, (too far), and the camera was nowhere near me as I watched the second owl sail past much closer. Both were heading in a north-to-south direction, lending a little support to the idea that they might have been in migration at the time.
  • On December 7th while I still lay in bed, through the window next to me, I spotted a 1st winter Bald Eagle fly past over the trees to the east. It soared briefly and then continued on in a SE direction.
  • While moving the fallen foliage around with the leaf blower on December 8th at home, I looked up, (as I find I constantly am doing these days) and saw two large, dark birds very high almost straight above me. Before I was able to grab the scope, I could see that they were eagles. Once in focus, the white bases of tails and primaries with all other plumage completely dark, identified them both as 1st winter Golden Eagles. A strong and steady SW wind pushed them NW of me. They were only about ten wingspans (about 20 m) apart and one was just a little ahead of the other. They slowed briefly once or twice, but never paused to soar while I had them in view.

1st winter Golden Eagle – USFWS

Tim Dyson – Warsaw

Dec 032017
 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Dec 09, 2017 12:01 by Ben Taylor
– Charlotte and Rubidge, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40994101
– Comments: “Seen flying east along Charlotte Street. Stocky bird with steady, powerful wingbeats.”

Northern Shrike (Lanius borealis) (1)
– Reported Dec 09, 2017 08:48 by Matthew Tobey
– Otonabee River b/w Peterborough and Lakefield, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Hunting on far shore north of lock 24.”

Northern Shrike – Tom Northey

(Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Dec 09, 2017 10:20 by Ian Sturdee
– Cordova Lake, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “On rock island in middle of lake. Probable young female female- heavily patterned. ”

Snowy Owl – Wendy Leszkowicz

Snowy Owl: I photographed this Snowy Owl on December 4 near Colborne. The bird was just south of the 401 on County Road 25, just past Purdy Corners.  Jeff Keller

Snowy Owl – Colborne – Dec. 4, 2017 – Jeff Keller

 

Northern Goshawk (American) (Accipiter gentilis atricapillus/laingi) (1)
– Reported Dec 06, 2017 11:10 by Luke Berg
– Lansdowne St W at The Parkway, Peterborough CA-ON , Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “First winter bird flying south over Lansdowne, briefly pursuing a flock of pigeons. ”

Northern Goshawk – Wikimedia

Red-bellied Woodpecker:  This red-bellied has been visiting my office window feeder at Camp Kawartha on Clear Lake. Jacob Rodenburg

Red-bellied Woodpecker at Camp Kawartha – December 4, 2017 – Jacob Rodenburg

Snowy Owl:  We sighted and photographed this Snowy Owl this morning, Dec. 3 at 8:30 AM on Clear Lake.  John McGregor

Nov 022017
 

Red-shouldered Hawk (lineatus Group) (Buteo lineatus [lineatus Group]) (1)
– Reported Nov 04, 2017 10:32 by Luke Berg
– Luke’s Yard, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40302920
– Comments: “Adult at 1453h. ”

Red-shouldered Hawk (Brendan Boyd)

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Nov 02, 2017 09:20 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – Robinson Place, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40260768

Peregrine Falcon (Wikimedia photo)

Oct 232017
 

 

 October 28 – For the second time this week, a Cooper’s Hawk was in my yard today. I knew it was around because a couple of dozen Mourning Doves flew out of the spruce tree they roost in.  Sue Paradisis

Cooper’s Hawk on Rock Pigeon – Helen Nicolaides Keller

 

 Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) (2)
– Reported Oct 28, 2017 11:59 by Iain Rayner
– Pigeon Lake–Sandy Point, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Dirtyish cheeks and neck, long bill”

Red-necked Grebe. The grebe in the lower right is in winter plumage. – Wikimedia

 
October 27 – I had four Red-shouldered Hawks here at home today, plus nine Red-tailed Hawks, and one  Sharp-shinned Hawk for my hours sitting out in between chopping wood. The Red-shouldered Hawks were three adults and one immature, and the Red-tailed Hawks were about half and half. The Sharp-shinned Hawk? Couldn’t tell – a bit too high. For a little while at least, it was hopping around the sky here!! No more Monarchs since #532 on October 26 at Nephton. I don’t believe I’ve ever had a November sighting, but if I am going to, I’ll bet it will be this year. This last week of October is certainly the best week of the year, not only to count Red-tailed Hawks and Golden Eagles, but also Red-shouldered Hawks, as well. I am glad to be getting out and looking up.  Tim Dyson, Warsaw

Red-shouldered Hawk – Karl Egressy

 

Monarch – Saw a Monarch today, October 26, on Nephton Ridge, near Petroglyph Provincial Park. Was gliding southward about 50′ above ground despite temperature around 8C!  Drew Monkman

Monarch Butterfly – Terry Carpenter

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Oct 27, 2017 07:50 by Scott Gibson
– Downtown – MNR Building, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Peregrine – often seen on MNR Bldg & sometimes clock tower in downtown Peterborough (Rick Stankiewicz)

Mallard: Here’s a photo of a leucistic (lacking normal pigment) Mallard photographed this summer near Whitaker Street, west of Armour Street North in Peterborough. The bird departed in early October. We nick-named the bird “Miss Vicky”!  Gord Young

Leucistic mallard – Whitaker Mills, Ptbo – summer 2017 – Gord Young

American Robin:  Watched a small flock today, October 23, feeding on abundant berry-like cones of Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginia) at Roper Park –  Drew Monkman

Robin feeding on E. Red Cedar berries at Roper Park 2017-10-23 – Drew Monkman

Berry-like cones of Eastern Red Cedar – Sept. 19, 2017 – PRHC – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolina Wren:  Turned up at my feeder today, October 23.  Phil McKeating, Creekwood Drive, near Harper Park in Peterborough

 

Carolina Wren (Wikimedia)

Black Scoter (Melanitta americana) (2)
– Reported Oct 23, 2017 07:44 by Iain Rayner
– Pigeon Lake–Sandy Point, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Female type. Black ducks with pale cheek”

Black Scoter – Crossley ID Guide of Eastern Birds – Wikimedia

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 10:45 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “calling (‘crick’) from high in Red Pine then in flight W over beaver pond; W side entrance loop road around 250 m N of locked gate at CR 56.”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 08:25 by Brian Wales
– Peterborough Landfill Wetland Project ponds, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “white goose with clear grinning patch along beak”

SNGO – Rice L. – Oct. 18, 2014 -Ron Mackay

 

Oct. 22 – Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 07:06 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Yard – Bear Creek Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Red Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

Oct 122017
 

October 10: I had my first two Dark-eyed Juncos today. Sue Paradisis, Peterborough

Dark-eyed Junco by Marcel Boulay

October 9: Today there was a Peregrine at the Buckhorn Lock. I was travelling south when it flew over the bridge at handrail height and landed in a tree about ten feet away from the east (lower Buckhorn) side of the bridge. Have other people seen that one or do you think it was passing through?  David Beaucage Johnson, Curve Lake

Peregrine – Karl Egressy

October 6: I have been hearing this annoying screeching coming from my maple tree out front in the evening for the past few weeks. It started during a hot weather spell in mid-September, and hasn’t stopped since. It starts soon after the sun sets and lasts all night, until the break of dawn. I thought at first it was some kind of bird, but after doing some research, I found that it is, in fact, an insect: a Common True Katydid. Hard to believe a bug can make such a loud, annoying noise, but apparently katydids do. The odd thing is that we live much farther north than what I thought was the katydid’s usual range…we live on the outskirts of Ottawa, about 40km to the East. In any event, I have attached a sound clip I took this evening (be sure to turn up the volume, I didn’t have the record volume at maximum when I recorded the clip). Although it’s annoying, I feel a little sad for the poor thing. I do believe he may be calling for a mate, but I doubt he’ll find one this far from home. Lynne Laviolette-Snyder, Embrun, ON (near Ottawa)

Common True Katydid (Wikimedia)

October 8: I spotted a Blue-spotted Salamander on a piece of armour stone at the waters edge on the upper portion of Buckhorn Lake last night. The worm on the hook was not me trying to catch the salamander; it was for reference.  We were catching crayfish.  I saw the salamander at 10 pm last night. It was approximately 9″ in length with blue spots all over its body but mainly on the tail, feet and lower portion of body.  Shawn Filteau

Blue-spotted Salamander – Shawn Filteau

 

 

Aug 292017
 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Aug 27, 2017 14:28 by E. Straka
– Otonabee Gravel Pit Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) (1)
– Reported Aug 27, 2017 14:28 by E. Straka
– Otonabee Gravel Pit Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Peregrine – Karl Egressy

Olive-sided Flycatcher – Wikimedia

Aug 152017
 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Aug 14, 2017 14:14 by Dan Chronowic
– Lansdowne St. and The Parkway – Peterborough, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Hunting Rock Pigeons above the Spaghetti Factory. Caught a Rock Pigeon and landed on the top of the truck garage adjacent to the Spaghetti Factory.”

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens 2 – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

Jan 132017
 

I saw a Peregrine Falcon in Peterborough on January 10, 2017 at 3:25 pm. It alighted on the top of a telephone pole at the corner of Downie and Murray Streets. At first I thought it was a Merlin from the shape of the wings; I have seen a number of Merlins in recent years in this area. However, as I got closer, I realized it was noticeably larger.

Mark Rogers

A Peregrine photographed on the clock tower in 2009 (Rick Stankiewicz)

Dec 232016
 

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (1)
– Reported Dec 18, 2016 04:00 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – CBC Area 3 (Wedge from river to cty rd 4), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Responded to whinnying playback. In area near Water St N. Tim Hortons.”

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Dec 18, 2016 04:00 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – CBC Area 3 (Wedge from river to cty rd 4), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Calling at University Rd Wetland 4:10am”

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Dec 22, 2016 10:10 by Kyle Cameron
– CA-Ontario- KLT Blue Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Dec 22, 2016 08:45 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – Robinson Place, Charlotte St. at George St., Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Adult flew up onto the building”

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon - Loree Stephens 2 - Jan. 13, 2015 - PRHC

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens  – Jan. 13, 2015 – Peterborough Regional Health Centre

Barred Owl - Karl Egressy

Barred Owl – Karl Egressy

Great Horned Owl - Fleming Campus in Peterborough - Drew Monkman

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

Eastern Screech-owl - Beaches area of Toronto - via Jamie Brockley

Eastern Screech-owl – Beaches area of Toronto – via Jamie Brockley

Nov 202016
 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Nov 15, 2016 21:00 by Jeff Stewart
– 621 Carveth Drive, Millbrook, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32578096
– Comments: “heard hooting near house by Annie”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Nov 16, 2016 12:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Rotary Park & Walkway, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32585899
– Comments: “watching ducks closely from a snag over the river”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Nov 16, 2016 08:30 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Greyhound Bus Station, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32577711
– Comments: “Flying NW across downtown, large falcon, direct flight, stiff powerful wingbeats”

Peregrine - Karl Egressy

Peregrine – Karl Egressy

Great Horned Owl - Fleming Campus in Peterborough - Drew Monkman

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon - Loree Stephens 2 - Jan. 13, 2015 - PRHC

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens 2 – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

Oct 282016
 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Oct 27, 2016 13:40 by Chris Risley
– Downtown, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3033988,-78.3186717&ll=44.3033988,-78.3186717
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32255249
– Comments: “large raptor, sideburns visible; perched on provincial logo on west side of provincial government building at 300 Water St.”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Oct 27, 2016 13:53 by Colin Jones
– Peterborough–Robinson Place, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3032345,-78.31786&ll=44.3032345,-78.31786
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32255338
– Comments: “Sitting on Ontario logo on W side of building”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Oct 27, 2016 13:45 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Robinson Place, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3032345,-78.31786&ll=44.3032345,-78.31786
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32256105
– Comments: “adult (probable female by size) perched atop Ontario insignia on W face of N tower; hunched and facing building in mix of sleet and snow. Alerted to presence by Chris Risley”

 

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon - Loree Stephens 2 - Jan. 13, 2015 - PRHC

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens 2 – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

Peregrine - Karl Egressy

Jan 212016
 

Peregrine Falcon (North American) (Falco peregrinus anatum) (1)
– Reported Jan 20, 2016 13:03 by Luke Berg
– Luke’s Yard, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Adult seen at 2:25 pm. Gave amazing views as it flew up George Street (great views from my attic window) and then returned a couple minutes later and began dive bombing the Pigeons over George Street!

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon - Loree Stephens 2 - Jan. 13, 2015 - PRHC

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens 2 – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

Jan 162016
 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Jan 15, 2016 09:25 by Donald Sutherland
– Peterborough–Charlotte Towers, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “perched on communications tower atop 245 Charlotte St (Charlotte Towers) as viewed from the roof of the King Street Parking garage.”

Peregrine - Karl Egressy

Peregrine – Karl Egressy

Jan 142016
 

On January 13, 2015, my daughter and I watched a Peregrine Falcon eat a Rock Pigeon it had killed. The falcon was in the courtyard of the Peterborough Regional Health Centre. We were able to take a picture.

Mike Pineau

Note: Here are two other Peregrine sightings in Peterborough from earlier in the week:

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Jan 11, 2016 11:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Little Lake, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Dive bombing the herring gulls sitting on the edge of the ice, seen from Beavermeade”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Jan 12, 2016 07:43 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Water St., Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon - Loree Stephens 2 - Jan. 13, 2015 - PRHC

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens 2 – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

– Comments: “Flying across Water St. between Brock and Hunter”

Peregrine - by Stephanie Pineau - Jan. 13, 2015 - PRHC

Peregrine – by Stephanie Pineau – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

Nov 152014
 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Nov 14, 2014 13:20 by Michael Oldham
– Peterborough–Robinson Place, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “continuing adult, perched on SE corner of S tower, spotted by M.J. Oldham. Bird departed but had returned to same perch by 1430 h when observed walking W along edge of roof of S tower.”

A Peregrine photographed on the clock tower in 2009 (Rick Stankiewicz)

A Peregrine photographed on the clock tower in Peterborough in 2009 (Rick Stankiewicz)

Peregrine - Karl Egressy

Peregrine – Karl Egressy

Nov 072014
 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Nov 06, 2014 10:40 by Chris Risley
– Downtown – MNR Building, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “sitting on Northwest corner of MNR building”

Peregrine - Karl Egressy

Peregrine (Karl Egressy)

Northern Shrike (Lanius excubitor) (1)
– Reported Nov 02, 2014 15:15 by Peterborough County Birds Database
– Peterborough–Clonsilla Ave at Ford St, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “flyover, adult, in flight from W to E over Clonsilla Ave.”

Northern Shrike (by Susan Sayer)

Northern Shrike (Susan Sayer)

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) (12)
– Reported Nov 05, 2014 07:14 by Peterborough County Birds Database
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “flyovers, in single flock”

Snow Bunting  (from Crossley ID Guide)

Snow Buntings (from Crossley ID Guide)

 

Oct 202014
 

After we closed our Apsley-area cottage on Saturday (October 18), we took the boat and went by the cliff where the Peregrine Falcons nested this summer. We were surprised to see one of the adults flying above us. I guess this individual is planning on staying longer than us at the lake this fall!

Marie Duchesneau

Peregrine - Karl Egressy

Peregrine – Karl Egressy

Sep 132014
 

With the thoughts of seeing a good flight of migrating raptors tomorrow soaring through my mind, I sat out on the porch with my second coffee of the day, (Friday September 5th). It was 11:45 am, and the humid air was cooled some by strong breezes, so a nice balance of late summer heat with good airflow. I suddenly heard the familiar “klinking call” of at least one or two upset starlings. As I raised my eyes to spot the offending raptor, I was somewhat surprized not to see a Cooper`s or Sharp-shinned Hawk, but instead a Peregrine passing just out in front of me in very fast level flight, speed being maintained by quite stiff and shallow strokes of the wings.

Flying directly away from me – it must have just passed straight over the porch where I sat – I looked on ahead of the falcon in time to see three or four pigeons on my neighbour`s barn roof peak. I was surprized at how close, (appeared to be ten meters or less), that the falcon actually got to the closest pigeon before they, and nearly 30 previously un-seen others, took to the air and immediatly balled up. During the second swipe of “the ball” of pigeons, the falcon managed to pry one bird from the tight group, and the chase was now one of focus and determination. The distance between the two was kept to about 20 meters, but interestingly, (and somewhat typical), the falcon closed the distance to about only two or three meters once the pigeon began to climb.

Just as one would expect to see the pigeon ripped and transformed into a descending comet of feathers, it twisted, dropped sharply, and managed to wind up flying back the other way. (The kind of move that would have torn the wings clear off of a WWI bi-plane!!) My hat is off to this skilled pigeon. It often winds up going the other way, once the falcon closes the gap that much, and that quickly. The defeated, (though now wiser), falcon left the area after the “flying lesson” given by the pigeon, and headed out over the trees and eastward towards where it must have come from only half a minute before. The Peregrine was a HY (hatch year, or immature) bird. I`m guessing that the pigeon may have been somewhat older based on the impressive way it “handled” the situation. Either that, or it took one very risky chance, one that for now at least, has payed off.

Next day, (the 6th), I had got up a little later than I had hoped to, having stayed up half the previous night enjoying the storm.
I took a chair out into the field to spend some time hawk watching, as migration was now on and we had just had a sharp cold front which would enhance conditions for raptor migration. No sooner had I sat down, and along came a Sharp-shinned Hawk which pulled up to land in a large, isolated ash tree in the field. It sat for about 20 minutes preening and looking around the surrounding countryside. I had plenty of time to watch it closely and determine that it was a second year (sub-adult) female with her pale orange eyes and fairly dull, yet nearly complete adult plumage. It was easy too, to see that she was on the larger end of the Sharp-shinned scale, especially when she flew. I stayed in the field for only 90 minutes before I had to get on with daily chores, but before I left, I had counted 14 monarchs. Most were flying overhead from 10 to 20 meters up, but a few were low, and visiting New England Asters and goldenrods. The only other “raptor” I saw was a turkey vulture as I walked through the field back home.

So, off to the store and the local dump I went. Though they were in pockets, thicker in some places and absent in others, I ended up counting a day total of 48 monarchs, (16 more than I saw during all of 2013!) While out driving, the best spots seemed to be anywhere where there were lots of goldenrods and other yellow flowers, New England Asters, and damp sandy spots with puddles left over from the rain the night before – I saw 11 at my local dump alone, and all were hanging around damp sand there.

Well, my predicted “big hawk flight day” was somewhat of a bust, but for monarchs, I will not complain. I saw another 8 on Sunday, and 8 again on Monday, but have not seen another since then, (and it is now Thursday morning.) And so, at this time, my 2014 monarch total stands at 148.

Tim Dyson

two Monarchs on Helianthus giganteus - Tim Dyson

two Monarchs on Helianthus giganteus – Tim Dyson

Jun 192014
 

Today, I saw and photographed two young Peregrines in a nest on a lakeside cliff in  North Kawartha Township. I did not see either of the adults, since they must have been away hunting for food.  Last year, the Peregrines nested in the same location and raised two young. This marked the first recorded successful Peregrine nesting in Peterborough County that I’m aware of.  The young left the nest the first week of July. In 2012, the birds attempted to nest but were unsuccessful. The cliff was historically used by ravens for nesting. The recovery of the Peregrine from the brink of extirpation in Ontario has been nothing short of remarkable.

Drew Monkman

Peregrines in North Kawartha Township nest - July 19, 2014 - Drew Monkman

Peregrines in North Kawartha Township nest – July 19, 2014 – Drew Monkman