Aug 312016
 

I live on the Otonabee River between locks 24 & 25, and saw a pair of what I believe were Merlins flying over our yard Wednesday evening, August 24. Both of them had the shape of small falcons. I got a good look only at the brownish one when it landed on a cedar tree, but the markings looked unmistakable (definitely not a kestrel).

This is a fabulous place to live. We’re on the end of the road, so we have the river, but also mixed forest across the river and overgrown fields on two sides, one of which also has wetland, so we get a wonderful variety of birds. We had an American Bittern gullunking all spring, as well as Bobolinks in the fields. Also regularly see a Northern Harrier and American Kestrels, sometimes Red-tailed Hawks… and now Merlins. We also have loons as well as a pair of Baltimore Orioles, who, judging by the number of fledglings, had two clutches this year. Oh, and Bald Eagles in the winter. Who could ask for anything more?

Annamarie Beckel
writer ~ editor ~ ecologist

www.annamariebeckel.com

 

 

Bobolink - Wikimedia

Bobolink – Wikimedia

Baltimore Oriole on hummingbird feeder - Doug Gibson

Baltimore Oriole on hummingbird feeder – Doug Gibson

American Bittern - by Don Pettypiece

American Bittern – by Don Pettypiece

Merlin (Karl Egressy)

Merlin (Karl Egressy)

May 262016
 

I heard and saw the first Bobolinks May 10 and managed some photos more recently. The males perch right on the tip of an apple tree branch to sing.  I’ve also included pictures of two cormorants on one of their favourite perches on the river just south of Lakefield near the entrance to the Greenhouse garden centre on May 21.

Gwen Forsyth, Lakefield

Bobolink (male) - Gwen Forsyth

Bobolink (male) – Gwen Forsyth

Double-crested Cormorant - May 2016 - Gwen Forsyth

Double-crested Cormorant – May 2016 – Gwen Forsyth

Double-crested Cormorants in tree - May 2016 - Gwen Forsyth

Double-crested Cormorants in tree – May 2016 – Gwen Forsyth

May 222016
 

On the morning of May 17 on roads west of Highway 7A, there were abundant Bobolinks, Eastern Meadowlarks, two Brown Thrashers, Savannah Sparrows, Eastern Kingbirds, Tree Swallows, and several Baltimore Orioles together in a shrub.

Enid Mallory

Eastern Meadowlark - Karl Egressy

Eastern Meadowlark – Karl Egressy

Brown Thrasher  - Ken Thomas WM

Brown Thrasher – Ken Thomas