Sep 242017
 

Now’s the time to take in the beauty of autumn at Ontario Parks!

The 2017 Ontario Parks Fall Colour Report is LIVE! Check for the latest colour changes in up to 60 provincial parks across Ontario by using the report’s map and peak-viewing chart. Staff will be updating their park reports every week so check back often for the latest conditions. Climatologists predict brilliant reds and golds, thanks to an abundance of rain.

Mid-September to late October is prime-time viewing when campsites are plentiful and camp cabins and yurts are easier to book.

Algonquin Provincial Park is extremely popular on peak fall colour weekends. Before you visit Algonquin, this is what you need to know.

The Parks Blog also suggests other fall colour parks worth visiting. In Northern Ontario, try these parks. More park choices are found in this fall colour post.

Lots of special events are also planned. Visit the Ontario Parks’ calendar of events for details.

Ontario Parks posts regularly on Twitter and Facebook.

High-resolution, credited photography related to the above can be downloaded from a mini photo library here.

We’ll see you there!

Sarah McMichael

Leaf colour east of Apsley – October 1, 2012

Sep 242017
 

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) (1)
– Reported Sep 22, 2017 08:09 by McLean Smith
– 2 Woodland Dr, Peterborough CA-ON (44.3634,-78.2926), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.363432,-78.292649&ll=44.363432,-78.292649
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39331356
– Comments: “I am not 100% certain as to the ID of this bird, but based on size, shape, and colouration, I am fairly confident in calling it a juvenile Northern Mockingbird. It was perched atop a spruce tree showing a bay to grey overall colouring, with faint mottling on the upper breast and a very faint eye line, with no other discernible features (I did not see it fly to confirm white patches). The only alternative ID I can think of is a juvenile Northern Shrike, but the head appeared too small in relation to the body. Any help or local checklists to confirm or deny would be much appreciated. ”

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Sep 22, 2017 06:12 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Yard – Bear Creek Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5064687,-78.4726858&ll=44.5064687,-78.4726858
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39326314
– Comments: “Hooting to the south”

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (2)
– Reported Sep 21, 2017 17:00 by Chris Risley
– Cottage at Stumpy Bay, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.7255067,-78.2984622&ll=44.7255067,-78.2984622
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39326758
– Comments: “calling across Stumpy Bay”

Sep 242017
 

Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) (1)
– Reported Sep 22, 2017 10:30 by Scott McKinlay
– Millbrook Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1492506,-78.4480704&ll=44.1492506,-78.4480704
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39345272
– Comments: “Seen with a solitary sandpiper on a mud bar in Millbrook pond. It was slightly smaller than the solitary with browner, lighter upperparts; shorter brighter legs; white belly and breast extending up the side in front of the wing; and it bobbed it’s tail incessantly. ”

Spotted Sandpiper with dragonfly nymph in beak – Lower Buckhorn Lake – June 2016 – Robin Blake

Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria) (1)
– Reported Sep 22, 2017 10:30 by Scott McKinlay
– Millbrook Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1492506,-78.4480704&ll=44.1492506,-78.4480704
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39345272
– Comments: “Seen on a mud bar with a spotted sandpiper. It had longer legs than the spotted sandpiper, had slatey grey upperparts with fine white speckling, grayish breast, white belly, an eye ring, and straight dark bill about the same length as the head.”