Jun 042016
 

Just an update related to my earlier Whooping Crane sighting.  I met a fellow from the MNR who, on Friday May 20, saw a Whooping Crane spiraling above the Beer Store in Peterborough (two weeks to the day after my sighting). His name is Scott Poser.

Also there are two nesting pairs of Bald Eagles on Buckhorn lake. One on Joe’s Island and one on Flat Island. The eagles moved to Joe’s Island 2 or 3 years ago, then a new pair took over Flat Island just this spring. The two nests are about 1 kilometre from each other. There may be more in the area, I haven’t been out on the lake yet. Those are just the nests that I can see from my house.

David Beaucage Johnson

Note: This makes for at least five Bald Eagle nests in the Kawarthas, including nests on Stony, Katchewanooka and the Trent River. I suspect there are more. D.M.

Whooping Crane in flight - Wikimedia

Whooping Crane in flight – Wikimedia

Bald Eagle nest on Stony Lake (photo by Jeff Jones)

Bald Eagle nest on Stony Lake (photo by Jeff Jones)

May 082016
 

On Friday, May 6, I was watching a Turkey Vulture circling overhead at Curve Lake, when a large, bright white bird with black wing tips and long legs flew past it, heading west. The black was definitely limited to the primary feathers. There was no black in the secondaries, which rules out a Wood Stork or American White Pelican, both of which I’ve seen in the wild. The legs were visibly long and the neck was white along the entire length. The head was not distinctively big like a pelican or stork, nor was it dark like a stork. It flew without soaring whatsoever, just a steady beating of wings and a straight flight course. In a quick search of ‘whooping cranes ontario’, I found that there were three spotted in Almonte, Ontario on the 24th of April 2016. http://www.ofnc.ca/breports.php I feel quite certain that what what I saw was a Whooping Crane. The only thing that I am less certain about was the size of the bird. It came from the direction of Katchewanooka Lake and was travelling in the direction of Fenelon Falls.
David Beaucage Johnson, Curve Lake First Nation

Whooping Crane with Sandhill Cranes - note big size difference - Wikimedia

Whooping Crane with Sandhill Cranes – note big size difference – Wikimedia

Whooping Crane in flight - Wikimedia

Whooping Crane in flight – Wikimedia