Oct 032018
 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Oct 28, 2018 07:35 by Tim Haan
– 169 Pencil Lake Road, Kinmount, Ontario, CA (44.816, -78.364), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49525404

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Oct 28, 2018 16:25 by Tim Haan
– 6152 Ontario 28, Woodview, Ontario, CA (44.59, -78.145), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49525305
– Comments: “Fly across the road”

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Oct 28, 2018 14:30 by Kim Zippel
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49530655
– Comments: “Identified by call”

Barred Owl – Jeff Keller 12 01 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woodland Jumping Mouse?

I am emailing you some photos of a mouse I trapped in our old farmhouse basement on Parkhill Road W. I remember, a couple years ago, cutting tall grass in a field near our house seeing what I thought was a mouse or rat that was moving like a kangaroo. The mouse in the photo has short fore legs and long and more muscular hind legs.  Allen Rodgers

N.B. At first I thought this was a Woodland Jumping Mouse. However, I was mistaken. This is in fact a Deer Mouse. The angle, and the way the damp fur on the back legs is positioned, make the back legs appear abnormally long (and the fore legs short). I’d like to thank Tim Dyson and Don Sutherland for the correct identification. To see a Woodland Jumping Mouse, scroll down.

Tim wrote:  “The jumping mouse’s body (without tail) is only about 1/3 its total length  (with the tail). It has quite yellowish fur dulling a little towards brownish on the back, and a”paler” (not bright white as the mouse in the photo) belly. It also has very long toes at the tips of VERY long hind feet.”

Here is additional information on the Woodland Jumping Mouse from Don Sutherland, zoologist at the Natural Heritage Information Centre here in Peterborough.

” The Woodland Jumping Mouse is common, but hard to see. It’s strictly a forest species preferring mesic/fresh-to-moist tracts with dense herbaceous and low shrub understoreys. Individuals may venture out to forest edges with similarly dense understoreys. In open woodlands you’re more likely to encounter Meadow Jumping Mouse which occurs in a wide variety of relatively dry to wet habitats and has a far more extensive provincial range. Jumping mice don’t emerge from ‘hibernation’ until sometime in May and disappear again sometime in September, perhaps making them even less likely to be encountered. I once unearthed a Meadow Jumping Mouse from a compost pile in early November. It was in deep torpor, curled in a ball and with its long tail wrapped around it. It felt cold in my hand and not wanting to arouse it, I quickly returned it to the compost pile and buried it.

The mouse in the photo looks like a Peromyscus to me and most likely P. maniculatus (Deer Mouse). Both Woodland and Meadow jumping mice have bright ochre/orange sides and relatively shorter ears. I’ve never heard of a jumping mouse entering a human habitation, but I suppose it’s possible. Deer mice, on the other hand, regularly enter human habitations. The ‘Prairie’ Deer Mouse (P. m. bairdii) moved into southern Ontario following European land clearance and is now the common Peromyscus of open habitats in southern Ontario, occurring everywhere from corn fields to urban gardens.”

Deer Mouse – October 2018 – Parkhill Rd. West – Allen Rodgers

Woodland Jumping Mouse, Napaeozapus insignis – John Fowler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Phalarope (Phalaropus fulicarius) (1)
– Reported Oct 21, 2018 16:24 by Mike V.A. Burrell
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “Very Rare! Found earlier by Don Sutherland. I stopped at nw corner of south cell to scope east shore where it had been seen earlier but it flushed from close to me and flew into centre of north cell. I watched it for a bit there before a scalp approached it and it circled then headed west towards river. Heard several times giving high pitched chip call.”

 

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) (1)
– Reported Oct 19, 2018 13:45 by Mike V.A. Burrell
– Hwy 28-Between Apsley and Peterborough Cty bndry, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Juv bird being chased by CORA at North kawartha Con. 18. Large all dark eagle with prominent white patches at base of inner primaries and tail feathers.”

Juvenile Golden Eagle – USFWS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cardinal on north shore of Stoney Lake

On October 19, there was a female Northern Cardinal on my deck railing on Northey’s Bay Road on the north shore of Stoney Lake. I have never ever seen one here. Very exciting! Bet Curry
N.B. Cardinals are rarely seen in Peterborough County this far north. D.M.

Female cardinal above male (Kelly Dodge)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hermit Thrush at 51 Maple Crescent

Today, October 16, I had a Hermit Thrush in the yard. I was able to see that the tail was distinctly more reddish than the back. At first I thought it was a Fox Sparrow, which I often have at my feeder in mid- to late October.  Drew Monkman

Hermit Thrush – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moose seen at Stoney Lake

Last Friday morning (Oct. 12) at around 7:00 a.m, a couple of my neighbours, who were alerted by their dogs’ barking, spotted a Moose wandering around our cottage properties (including mine) on McNaughton’s Bay, which is a small bay off of South Bay at the east end of Stoney Lake.  The barking apparently didn’t faze the moose at all, and it carried on westward along the shoreline of our properties.  Antje and I were still asleep at the time, but one of my neighbours forwarded these pictures to me.  I’ve never seen a Moose anywhere near this area in the 35 years I’ve been here, nor have my neighbours who have had their cottage here for 40-plus years.  René Gareau

Moose – McNaughton’s Bay – Stoney Lake – October 12, 2018 via René Gareau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pine Siskins at Stoney Lake feeder

Today, October 11, I have 4 Pine Siskins at a feeder. Last winter I saw zero.
All of the usuals are here as well, including 2 White-crowned Sparrows.
In the last several weeks I have also seen, a half dozen times, an immature Bald Eagle patrolling the Gilchrist Bay/ Duck Pond area. Rob Welsh, Dodsworth Island, Stoney Lake

Pine Siskin (by Karl Egressy)

White-crowned Sparrow – Mike Barker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (6) via eBird
– Reported Oct 07, 2018 14:30 by Steve Paul
– Briar Hill Bird Sanctuary, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “Middle of flock in field amongst CG. Five together (1 adult white, 1 juvenile white, 1 adult blue morph, 2 juvenile blue morph), plus another adult about 10 ft away.”

Snow Geese (Marcel Boulay)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) (2)  via eBird
– Reported Oct 06, 2018 12:47 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Omemee Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Horned Lark (by Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagles at Stoney Lake

I saw a second-year Bald Eagle (immature) flying over the east end of Stoney Lake (South Bay) last Saturday, Sept. 29. Today, October 4, I had another eagle sighting at 12:42 pm. This one was a beautiful adult eagle gliding gracefully over South Bay, with clear blue skies as a backdrop… wonderful sighting! South Bay is located at the east end of Stoney Lake. Rene Gareau, Peterborough

Adult Bald Eagle (Karl Egressy)

Immature Bald Eagle – Otonabee R. – Feb. 3, 2017 – Gwen Forsyth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snow Geese on Otonabee River

Today, October 4, there are 5 Snow Geese mixed in with a flock of Canada Geese on the Otonabee River at the north end of Trent University. Carl Welbourn, Kawartha Camera Club

Snow Geese – Otonabee R. – Oct. 4, 2018 – Carl Welbourn

Snow Geese with single Canada Goose – Otonabee R. – Oct. 4, 2018 – Carl Welbourn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blackburnian Warbler (1) via eBird
– Reported Oct 02, 2018 13:25 by Brendan Boyd
– Peterborough–Jackson Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Late”

Blackburnian Warbler in spring  – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chestnut-sided Warbler (1) via eBird
– Reported Oct 02, 2018 13:25 by Alexandra Israel
– Peterborough–Jackson Park, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3118937,-78.3405192&ll=44.3118937,-78.3405192
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48892063

Male Chestnut-sided warbler in spring – Jeff Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wilson’s Warbler  (1) via eBird
– Reported Oct 02, 2018 12:10 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – Edgewater road and Railway, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Along tracks, seen well from point blank range, pure yellow underneath, green on back, distinct black cap and long dark tail…possibly continuing.”

Wilson’s Warbler – Wikipedia (Mike’s Birds)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snow Goose (5) via eBird
– Reported Oct 01, 2018 14:20 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “white morph adults with 26 Canada Geese, circled lagoons and flew off to WNW toward Lake Katchewanooka”

Snow Goose – Rice Lake – Oct. 18, 2014

Oct 232017
 

 

 October 28 – For the second time this week, a Cooper’s Hawk was in my yard today. I knew it was around because a couple of dozen Mourning Doves flew out of the spruce tree they roost in.  Sue Paradisis

Cooper’s Hawk on Rock Pigeon – Helen Nicolaides Keller

 

 Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) (2)
– Reported Oct 28, 2017 11:59 by Iain Rayner
– Pigeon Lake–Sandy Point, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Dirtyish cheeks and neck, long bill”

Red-necked Grebe. The grebe in the lower right is in winter plumage. – Wikimedia

 
October 27 – I had four Red-shouldered Hawks here at home today, plus nine Red-tailed Hawks, and one  Sharp-shinned Hawk for my hours sitting out in between chopping wood. The Red-shouldered Hawks were three adults and one immature, and the Red-tailed Hawks were about half and half. The Sharp-shinned Hawk? Couldn’t tell – a bit too high. For a little while at least, it was hopping around the sky here!! No more Monarchs since #532 on October 26 at Nephton. I don’t believe I’ve ever had a November sighting, but if I am going to, I’ll bet it will be this year. This last week of October is certainly the best week of the year, not only to count Red-tailed Hawks and Golden Eagles, but also Red-shouldered Hawks, as well. I am glad to be getting out and looking up.  Tim Dyson, Warsaw

Red-shouldered Hawk – Karl Egressy

 

Monarch – Saw a Monarch today, October 26, on Nephton Ridge, near Petroglyph Provincial Park. Was gliding southward about 50′ above ground despite temperature around 8C!  Drew Monkman

Monarch Butterfly – Terry Carpenter

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Oct 27, 2017 07:50 by Scott Gibson
– Downtown – MNR Building, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Peregrine – often seen on MNR Bldg & sometimes clock tower in downtown Peterborough (Rick Stankiewicz)

Mallard: Here’s a photo of a leucistic (lacking normal pigment) Mallard photographed this summer near Whitaker Street, west of Armour Street North in Peterborough. The bird departed in early October. We nick-named the bird “Miss Vicky”!  Gord Young

Leucistic mallard – Whitaker Mills, Ptbo – summer 2017 – Gord Young

American Robin:  Watched a small flock today, October 23, feeding on abundant berry-like cones of Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginia) at Roper Park –  Drew Monkman

Robin feeding on E. Red Cedar berries at Roper Park 2017-10-23 – Drew Monkman

Berry-like cones of Eastern Red Cedar – Sept. 19, 2017 – PRHC – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolina Wren:  Turned up at my feeder today, October 23.  Phil McKeating, Creekwood Drive, near Harper Park in Peterborough

 

Carolina Wren (Wikimedia)

Black Scoter (Melanitta americana) (2)
– Reported Oct 23, 2017 07:44 by Iain Rayner
– Pigeon Lake–Sandy Point, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Female type. Black ducks with pale cheek”

Black Scoter – Crossley ID Guide of Eastern Birds – Wikimedia

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 10:45 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “calling (‘crick’) from high in Red Pine then in flight W over beaver pond; W side entrance loop road around 250 m N of locked gate at CR 56.”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 08:25 by Brian Wales
– Peterborough Landfill Wetland Project ponds, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “white goose with clear grinning patch along beak”

SNGO – Rice L. – Oct. 18, 2014 -Ron Mackay

 

Oct. 22 – Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 07:06 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Yard – Bear Creek Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Red Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

Oct 212017
 

Oct. 21 – Narrow-winged Tree Cricket – Rob Tonus found this very late tree cricket on the grass beside the Rotary-Greenway Trail, just south of Nichol’s Oval Park. Note the reddish cap. This species sings at only at night, producing a mellow trill of variable length (usually 2-10 seconds). It is reminiscent of an American Toad. Drew Monkman

Narrow-winged Tree Cricket (Oecanthus niveus) 2 – Nichol’s Oval – Oct. 21, 2017 – D. Monkman

 

Oct 21 – Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
– Reported Oct 21, 2017 15:44 by Warren Dunlop
– Peterborough Landfill Wetland Project ponds, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “adult, white morph”

Snow Geese (Marcel Boulay)

 

October 20 – Monarch butterfly – I saw a very late Monarch today on County Road 16 at Edenderry Line. This is my latest date ever. There were also 10 Wild Turkeys in the same field.  Drew Monkman

Monarch on Boneset flowers – Drew Monkman

Opossum:  Recently, I found the remains of an Opossum – skin still intact – in our backyard. There were a couple of tufts of skin and hair nearby, so I am thinking our neighbours cat dispatched of it but didn’t like the taste! Our neighbour, directly behind us, found one on his property (also dead) one week before. Our neighbour at the end of our sub-division (Simons)..off Simons Ave. (off Chemong Rd.) saw a live one a short time ago and another neighbour saw one as well. On another topic, we have a variety of different birds in our sub-division from time to time, including 12 American Robins or so that stay all winter for a few years now…We did have frogs and toads but the frogs have gradually disappeared from view in the last few years. The strip of woods behind our sub-division and behind McDonald’s, adjacent to our sub-division and below the hill/tower behind Sobey’s, had or have coyotes and an occasional deer or fox are spotted from these areas. Sadly, not commonly known, we will be subject to more houses taking up the 25 acres in those areas mentioned by the year 2022. We are on wells yet with no benefits…but we too will feel the loss of land and habitat, its animal inhabitants and maybe our health as well.  Gloria Lamond

An opossum photographed in Ennismore several years ago

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 20 – Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) (1)
– Reported Oct 20, 2017 08:02 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–Fairbairn Street wetland, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Calling and then finaly seen moveing through hedgerow. Well seen from close distance. Black back head and tail, rusty sides. White patch on wing and white either side of tail”

Eastern Towhee – Karl Egressy

October 17 – Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (1)
– Reported Oct 17, 2017 20:00 by Michael Mechan
– James McLean Oliver Ecological Centre, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Dave Heuft)

October 15 – Just looked out the window and there were Chipping Sparrows everywhere. I was counting and at 18 when the White-throats came back again and I gave up. They are loving the spruce and birch seeds.    Sue Paradisis

Chipping Sparrow – Karl Egressy

 

 

October 14  – American Pipit (Anthus rubescens) (1)
– Reported Oct 14, 2017 17:23 by Amie MacDonald
– Peterborough–Loggerhead Marsh, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

American Pipit (from The Crossley ID Guide of Eastern Birds)

October 14 – Lincoln’s Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (3)
– Reported Oct 14, 2017 09:23 by Chris Risley
– Trent University: N. end of DNA building, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Lincoln’s Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

October 11 – Virginia Opossum

On or about this date, Hugh Kidd trapped and released a Virginia Opossum at the east end of the 7th Line of Selwyn, near the Otonabee River. Report via Leo Conlin

Opossum on Johnston Drive, south of Peterborough – Mary Beth Aspinall – Feb. 2014

Mar 062017
 

Snow Goose (Chen caerulescens) (1)
– Reported Mar 05, 2017 14:14 by Brian Bailey
– Peterborough–Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2939092,-78.3085044&ll=44.2939092,-78.3085044
Checklist:
– Media: 4 Photos
– Comments: “Blue phase with Canada Geese, initially on the lake. Later, feeding in the cemetery with Canada Geese.”

Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii) (1)
– Reported Mar 05, 2017 15:47 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2938973,-78.3027537&ll=44.2938973,-78.3027537
Checklist:
– Comments: “Smaller in size relative to CANG, stubbier bill and short neck. ”

Redhead (Aythya americana) (3)
– Reported Mar 05, 2017 17:50 by Luke Berg
– Pigeon Lake–Fothergill Isle Causeway, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Two males one female.”

Redhead – Tom Northey

Mar 112016
 

The meltwater pond at Mather’s Corners, located at the junction of County Road 2 and Drummond Line, is once again attracting a variety of waterfowl. Several hundred Canada Geese are there right now, along with dozens of Mallards. In addition to the species listed below, there are also small numbers of American Black Ducks and Northern Pintails.

Gadwall (Anas strepera)
– Reported Mar 14, 2016 11:38 by Warren Dunlop
– Mather’s Corners Meltwater Pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Pair – Male with light greyish tertials and black rump/tail.”

Snow Goose (Chen caerulescens) (1)
– Reported Mar 10, 2016 15:33 by Luke Berg
– Mather’s Corners Meltwater Pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “Continuing adult white morph.”

Cackling Goose (Richardson’s) (Branta hutchinsii) (1)
– Reported Mar 10, 2016 15:33 by Luke Berg
– Mather’s Corners Meltwater Pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 2 Photos

American Wigeon (Anas americana) (1)
– Reported Mar 11, 2016 10:10 by Martin Parker
– Mather’s Corners Meltwater Pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

SOME OTHER WATERFOWL OF INTEREST SEEN RECENTLY IN THE KAWARTHAS:

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) (1)
– Reported Mar 10, 2016 17:19 by Warren Dunlop
– Humphries Line, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Presumed continuing. Observed here previously.”

Redhead (Aythya americana) (5)
– Reported Mar 10, 2016 13:27 by Warren Dunlop
– Peterborough–Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Males with brick red heads, gray sides, black breasts and rump, and light greyish blue bills.”

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
– Reported Mar 10, 2016 16:40 by Warren Dunlop
– Rice Lake–Holiday Pines Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Female – lacking distinct white chin and well defined border between neck and breast of female COME. <br />Associating with large group of COME.”

American Black Duck - Karl Egressy

American Black Duck – Karl Egressy

Pair of Northern Pintail - Karl Egressy

Pair of Northern Pintail – Karl Egressy

Male Gadwall (photo from Wikimedia)

Male Gadwall (photo from Wikimedia)

Snow Geese (Marcel Boulay)

Snow Geese (Marcel Boulay)

American Wigeon - Alan D. Wilson

American Wigeon – Alan D. Wilson

Cackling Goose (small bird) with two Canada Geese - Brendan Boyd

Cackling Goose (small bird) with two Canada Geese – Brendan Boyd

Male Redhead (Wikimedia)

Male Redhead (Wikimedia)

Mute Swan (photo: Drew Monkman)

Mute Swan (photo: Drew Monkman)