Jun 102019
 

Blue-winged Warbler and Clay-coloured Sparrow
– Reported Jun 19, 2019 05:15 by Geoff Carpentier
– 1232 Peterborough County Road 10, Fraserville, Ontario, CA (44.181, -78.461), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Blue-winged Warbler – Wikimedia

Clay-colored Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Merganser family parade:  As I was working on my dock at the top of Lake Muskoka a couple of days ago, I heard a ruckus, ran up to the cottage for my camera, and managed to get a couple of shots of a mom and her babes out for a paddle.  When one on her back dropped off, another would climb on. All the while she merrily paddled along. Greg Piasetzki, Lake Muskoka

Note: Female Common Mergansers are famous for adopting abandoned or lost ducklings from another female merganser’s brood. They will also lay some of their own eggs in another female’s nest -sometimes even that of a different duck species. Check out this article. D.M.

Female Common Merganser with 12 ducklings – June 17, 2019 – Muskoka – Greg Piasetzki

Female Common Merganser with ducklings on her back – June 17, 2019 – Muskoka – Greg Piasetzki

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Blue Herons nesting: The heronry on Deer Bay Reach (Lower Buckhorn) now has about ten nests, all in use high in the pines. They’re on the secluded side of Three Islands, accessible by canoe or kayak once you get to that part of the lake. Ospreys used to nest here. Now one occupies a nest atop a lone dead pine at the west end of Three Islands facing Buckhorn. Three Bald Eagles (one adult, two juveniles) have been seen at their old nest at the northeast end of Black Duck Bay, toward the dams into Lovesick.  Janet Duval

Great Blue Heron nest at Trent Wildlife Sanctuary -June 28, 2016 – Tim Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robins nesting: I thought you might like to see our new neighbors. Clever place to put their nest, which is safe between the two downspouts. They christened our new fencing too! Clever critters they are.
We have a great influx of tent caterpillars, so that is helping things along. Gord Young, Peterborough

American Robin nest – June 18, 2019 – Gord Young

 

 

 

 

 

Polyphemus Moth: Late last summer I almost stepped on this big green caterpillar on my front walk. It carried on its way and I thought that was the end of it. On June 12 I came home to see a freshly emerged Polyphemus Moth hanging by my garage door. The caterpillar I saw was actually a Polyphemus caterpillar, probably one and the same! Kim Mitchell, Maple Dr., Ennismore 

Polyphemus caterpillar – Kim Mitchell

Polyphemus adult – Kim Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) (1)
– Reported Jun 16, 2019 09:05 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Deer Bay Reach Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5740226,-78.2863426&ll=44.5740226,-78.2863426
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57419901
– Comments: “Singing spontaneously around 100 m E of utility pole AET27J (3232/4777) by old bench S of #155 at 09:28 h, then on W edge of road singing from large red oak just S of 50 kph sign.”

Cerulean Warbler (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (1)
– Reported Jun 12, 2019 15:00 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough–Mervin Line, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Known location. Regular at several locations in the county during the summer.”

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandhill Cranes: I had a pair of Sandhills fly over my house at 11:35 am on June 11. They were going north. Gavin Hunter, Omemee 

Sandhill Cranes – Sept. 2018 – Lindsay area – Tim Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-winged Teal (Spatula discors) (1)
– Reported Jun 09, 2019 16:10 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57245041

Blue-winged Teal – Wikimedia

Greg Piasetzki – Upland Sandpiper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upland Sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) (2)
– Reported Jun 09, 2019 07:05 by Dave Milsom
– Dummer Alvar, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57234017
– Comments: “flew across back of field, then one landed on fence post: 1.4 kms. north of railroad on County Road 38”

Nov 282018
 
  • Snowy Owl – The Snowy Owls are back in the Lindsay / Little Britain area. The first sighting was two weeks ago. I shot this one yesterday (Nov. 22) on the road between Oakwood & Little Britain.
    Carl Welbourn, Kawartha Camera Club

    Snowy Owl – Nov. 22, 2019 – Little Britain – Carl Welbourn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Sightings from Campbellford – This morning, November 22, on the river (frozen), there were 6 River Otters and 4 Bald Eagles. In front of my house, I counted 3 female Pine Grosbeaks. Donald Munro, Campbellford

    River Otter eating a fish at Gannon’s Narrows, Buckhorn Lake (by Kinsley Hubbs)

    Sharing female Pine Grosbeaks – Nov. 22, 2018 – Campbellford – Donald Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Sandhill Cranes – At 4 pm this afternoon (November 23), I went out to get my paper. I live in Cavan on Larmer Line. A flock of 50-60 Sandhill Cranes were flying a few hundred feet up coming from the southeast down from Millbrook. They flew over my house and headed in a northwest direction in a V formation. Very distinct call. I took a pic of a few of the birds near our sanitation station in May 2015,  but was surprised to hear them first then spotted them coming right overhead. I would have thought they may have headed south by now, not heading north west. Wayne Stovell, Larmer Line, Fraserville

    Flock of Sandhill Cranes in flight (photo by Jerry Friedman)

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Sightings from Centre Dummer – I’ve been an avid birder for 40 or more years, originally in Mississauga then for 11 years while living in the Cowichan Valley on Vancouver Island. We’ve now lived in Centre Dummer for just over five years and I was surprised to see that you mentioned that Evening Grosbeaks were scarce in The Kawarthas. We’ve had them every late fall and winter at our black oil feeders. As a matter of fact I’ve seen two flocks of at least 10 to 12 in the last four or five days. Also I log my nature sightings and on Nov 14th while driving my wife to work in Peterborough we saw a small flock of what I believed to be Pine Grosbeaks on County Rd 40 near a stand of tall evergreens. Way to big to be Purple Finches but I couldn’t stop and be totally sure. On a few other occasions I’ve seen flocks of finches but once again I’m driving on County Rd 40, Webster and County Rd 8. All terrific bird sighting areas with the open land and mixed forest areas. I’m actually very surprised to have a pair of Northern Cardinals that come and go since last winter. I know they aren’t typically birds of the forest but somehow they’ve found our feeders though not nearly enough. I’ve only seen them twice in the last week since last winter. We have some real nice surprises yearly here with Scarlet Tanagers, Eastern Bluebirds and the best was Indigo Buntings once. My Calgarian raised wife was floored at their beauty! Mark Leslie, Centre Dummer

    Scarlet tanagers arrive back in the Kawarthas in mid-May (photo by Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Again this year, there are many Snowy Owls in the Lindsay area, especially between Oakwood and Little Britain. On several occasions, as many as three have been seen in the same field. Carl Welbourn, Kawartha Camera Club

Snowy Owl – Nov. 29, 2018 – Lindsay area – Carl Welbourn

Snowy Owl 2 – Nov. 29, 2018 – Carl Welbourn

  • Today, November 29, I had an American Kestrel turn up at my house in Campbellford and was able to get a picture of it eating a vole.  Donald Munro

  • On Friday, November 23 about 8:30 am a small flock of Evening Grosbeaks, maybe 6-8, were flitting about one of the our feeders. It’s been at least 8 years since I’ve seen these magnificent birds. After a few minutes, the group flew next door so I wasn’t able to get a really good view, but two returned and remained a while so I was rewarded, glued to my binoculars. I do hope they stay around. Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

    Male Evening Grosbeak – Wikimedia

    Female Evening Grosbeak – photo by Jeff Keller

 

  • I had a female Red-bellied Woodpecker and two female Pine Grosbeaks in my yard today. She was eating crab apples. Donald Munro, Campbellford

Female Red-belllied Woodpecker eating crabapple – November 2018 – Donald Munro

 

  • Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) (3)
    – Reported Nov 22, 2018 08:00 by Iain Rayner
    – Trent Rowing club, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50125087
    – Comments: “3 frosty coloured 1st winter birds seen at same time on dump pile. Frosty, pale primaries, same size as HERG, round heads and all dark bills.”

 

  • Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 22, 2018 11:45 by Dave Milsom
    – Peterborough–Trent University Canal Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50128298
    – Media: 1 Photo
    – Comments: “continuing 1st-year bird”

 

  • Jake Lake (Apsley, Peterborough County) Common Loon Survey 2018       (click on image to read)

Jack Lake 2018 Common Loon Survey (from Steven Kerr, Jack Lake Association)

  • Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 19, 2018 12:20 by Robert Walker Ormston
    – Peterborough–Rotary Park & Walkway, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3128468,-78.313466&ll=44.3128468,-78.313466
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50054347
    – Comments: “Most of the birds seen on list seen harassing this owl. Sitting close to the top of a white pine in a stand of white pine. A number of birds were around a fairly small area of the stand making agitated calls. Went to investigate and found owl after about 5 minutes.small pale and light brown owl lacking “ears” about 8to 10 meters up tree”

    Saw-whet Owl banding – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 18, 2018 14:33 by Donald A. Sutherland
    – Peterborough Regional Health Centre, Peterborough CA-ON (44.3001,-78.3470), Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50047143
    – Comments: “perched atop tower on roof of PRHC”

 

  • Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) (1)
    – Reported Nov 18, 2018 10:25 by Iain Rayner
    – Trent Rowing club, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50023765
    – Comments: “Continuing 1st year”

    Iceland Gull (Crossley Guide) First winter bird is lower left. Some are browner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 18, 2018 15:35 by Luke Berg
    – Otonabee River–Nassau Mills Dam to Lock 22, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50031280
    – Comments: “Continuing bird flying up river at the rowing club. Seen earlier around 11:30 as well. ”

    Glaucous Gull (adult) – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • We’ve seen a male Red-bellied Woodpecker eating suet from our feeder twice in the last two weeks. We live 2 km south of Trent University. Gorgeous bird! Doug Sadler’s book “Our Heritage of Birds – Peterborough County in the Kawarthas” – copyright 1983, lists this bird as a rare occasional visitor, this being the northern edge of its range. I’m wondering how frequently they are being seen here now. Is their range moving north because of climate change? Liz Sine                           N.B. Red-bellied Woodpeckers have actually become rather common in recent years. They are being seen all over the County, even on the Shield and right in Peterborough. I believe we saw six on last year’s Christmas Bird Count. Climate change most likely plays a role in the expansion northward of this southern species.

    Red-bellied Woodpecker – Lynde Creek, Whitby- Photo by Brian Crangle

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Update on Pat Edward’s Baltimore Oriole (see Nov. 7 below) The last we saw of the oriole was Tues., Nov. 13th. We headed up north very early in the morning on the bitter cold day – Wed. the 14th so we didn’t put out his feeder as it would have froze. We hung the feeder out again the following day (Nov. 15th) when we were back but we never saw him. It was very cold then as well. We did take a couple of pictures as he would show up early in the morning and if my husband didn’t have his feeder out, he would go to the sunflower one about 4′ away which we found very unusual. As soon as Kevin put out the oriole feeder, he would be there right away!! He must have gone to the feeder the last week I would say at least 50X a day.  It was such a treat to see him – he gave us lots of enjoyment and we just hope he survived that bitter weather. Pat Edwards, Ennismore

    Baltimore Oriole – Nov. 12, 2018 – Ennismore – Pat Edwards

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) (1)
    – Reported Nov 17, 2018 11:05 by Erica Nol
    – Douro 5th Line, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49995989
    – Comments: “continuing bird; in trees 50 m north of dead end on Douro 5th Line; white wing patches in flight”

    Northern Mockingbird – Gord Mallory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Today, November 17, I had 24+ Evening Grosbeaks at feeder 733 Ford Crescent in Cavan. Long time since I saw them last. Great sight. Ken Rumble

male Evening Grosbeak (Gord Belyea)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • I thought you might be interested (I’m watching the birds more closely today, November 16, as they are looking for food as the snow falls heavily) that I just saw a White-crowned Sparrow trying to eat at the sunflower feeder, but he couldn’t get a perch. Must be a migrant trying to get to better weather! Jane Bremner, Douro-Dummer

White-crowned Sparrow – Mike Barker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 16, 2018 08:30 by Mike V.A. Burrell
    – Peterborough–Robinson Place, Peterborough, Ontario
    – Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3032345,-78.31786&ll=44.3032345,-78.31786
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49968782
    – Comments: “adult sitting on very top of south tower.”

    Peregrine Falcon (Wikimedia photo)

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) (1)
    – Reported Nov 14, 2018 09:50 by Ben Taylor
    – Trent Rowing Club, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49933377
    – Comments: “Continuing bird with tan streaking and small. all-dark bill. Slightly smaller than the GLGU.
  • Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 14, 2018 09:50 by Ben Taylor
    – Trent Rowing Club, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49933377
    – Comments: “Continuing bird. Juvenile with long bi-coloured bill.”
  • On November 15, I had both a male and female Pine Grosbeak in my crab apple tree. A Pileated Woodpecker has also been coming to the tree. Donald Munroe, Campbellford

    Male Pine Grosbeak eating crab apples – Don Munroe – November 15, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • I can’t believe how busy my yard has been the last couple of weeks. Today, November 14, I had 15 species, including a female Pine Grosbeak eating crab apples, a Northern Flicker, my first American Tree Sparrow of the year, a Purple Finch and a late White-throated Sparrow. This is better than summer! In the last two weeks I have had 20 species, including 12+ Common Redpolls on November 9. That same day, I also had 3 Pine Grosbeaks feeding in my crab apple.  I could clearly see the dirty yellow, orange/brown head and rump and the wing bars. The one bird’s rump had a bit of red. I think it was an immature male and the others were females. Sue Paradisis, Peterborough

American Tree Sparrow (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • On November 8, I had 3 Evening Grosbeaks eating seeds with the chickadees. I bought very inexpensive feeders from the dollar store. They are green plastic trays hung by chains. The birds can fly in or perch on sides – even the woodpeckers.

 

  • This past spring and summer I had 3 pairs of Baltimore Orioles. I put grape jelly in an oriole feeder and my hummingbird feeders, the glass style with yellow ant block. I removed the yellow plastic and using sugar and water the orioles came to feed over and over again. When you remove yellow plastic ant block, all the birds join in with hummingbirds, woodpeckers and chickadees. As well my robin arrived this spring for the third year now. He comes to the deck rail and looks in the patio door for raisins. He just loves them! Esther Ross, Islandview Drive Bailieboro

 

  • I had removed all my oriole/hummingbird feeders in September after which I had not seen either of those birds around. The last week in October, we saw a male Baltimore oriole flying by.  I spotted it one day on our lilac tree so I made up some feed for him and put up the feeder where it always has been.  Within an hour, it had been discovered!  We bring the feeder in at dusk so the raccoons don’t get it as they have in the past. As of November 7, it has been here 10 days at the feeder, probably well over 30x a day.  We love seeing it and I’ve enclosed a couple of pictures. It has crossed my mind however, whether I should be feeding it, as it should have left to go south for warmer temperatures and I would hate the thought of it dying.  Pat Edwards, Ennismore  N.B. I think it’s fine to feed the bird, especially given the cold conditions. It may leave on its own or possibly try to stay all winter. This has happened in the past! Pat Edwards, Ennismore 

Baltimore Oriole – Ennismore – November 7, 2018 – Pat-Edwards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • On November 7, three Trumpeter Swans flew over my house at 10:30 am west of causeway on #7 highway, Omemee. Gavin Hunter

    A pair of Trumpeter Swans on the Pigeon River – February 25, 2017 – Karen Cooper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • On November 4, I had 8 Evening Grosbeaks show up in my yard. They didn’t stay long as the platform feeders had been cleaned out by the earlier birds.
    Sue Paradisis, Peterborough

 

  • Jack Lake 2018 Turtle Observations (Steve Kerr)

Thirty-three individuals reported turtle sightings from the Jack Lake area in 2018.  Ninety-one turtles, comprised of four different species.

Blanding’s Turtle – 7
Midland Painted Turtle – 43
Northern Map Turtle – 6
Snapping Turtle – 34

Blanding’s Turtle – Rick Stankiewicz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sep 222018
 

Peterborough Field Naturalists Sunday AM Nature Walk (Sept. 30)

Today, a group of us walked along the hydro corridor west of Hetherington Dr. (just south of Woodland) and into the north end of University Heights Park. We enjoyed the abundant asters (e.g., New England, Heath, Panicled, Heart-leaved), Zig-Zag Goldenrod, White Baneberry with its doll’s-eye fruit and a single Jack-in-the-Pulpit with its ball of red fruit. Birds of interest included White-throated Sparrow (20), White-crowned Sparrow (1), Song Sparrow (12), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1), Golden-crowned Kinglet (1), Eastern Towhee (1), Nashville Warbler (1), Palm Warbler (1), Belted Kingfisher (1), Pileated Woodpecker (1), Northern Flicker (1) and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (1). Earlier, we found a single Swainson’s Thrush on the Parkway Trail, just south of Cumberland Drive. Drew Monkman

White-crowned Sparrow (immature) – University Heights Hydro Corridor – Sept. 30, 2018, Reem Ali

 

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet has a prominent eye ring. (Karl Egressy)

Golden-crowned Kinglet – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lincoln’s Sparrow (2) via eBird
– Reported Sep 30, 2018 07:36 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Lincoln’s Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (1) via eBird
– Reported Sep 27, 2018 13:01 by Daniel Williams
– Ingleton-Wells Property (Kawartha Land Trust), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Barred Owl on Northey’s Bay Road – Jeff Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon  (1) via eBird
– Reported Sep 27, 2018 08:12 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Large adult eating bird atop 300 Water St.”

Peregrine – by Stephanie Pineau – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-winged Teal (2) via eBirds
– Reported Sep 23, 2018 10:36 by Rene Gareau
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Blue-winged Teal – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Squirrels hoarding rocks:  I just found your site and wanted to add my comments regarding gray & black squirrels stealing rocks. Here in Chilliwack, BC  we have been observing squirrels stealing hundreds of rocks every fall and winter. They steal all sizes, types, and work all day to take away their treasure. This usually starts when seasons change with wet and cooler days arriving. I think they hoard the rocks to stabilize their dreys and also putting the flat ones inside the nest to warm the bed over the winter for the young when they are born and vulnerable. I’m basing this on many hours of watching squirrel behavior from our living room which faces a heavily forested back garden. My husband and I are constantly renewing our landscaping rocks with humour at the hard work of these amazing little critters. Jenne Breedon, Chilliwack, BC

(Note: For other reports on this behaviour, see November 30, 2014 )

Gray Squirrel with stone – Nov. 2014 – Ginny Clark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lincoln’s Sparrow (2) via eBird
– Reported Sep 23, 2018 13:53 by Luke Berg
– LHT Redmond Rd to Drummond Line , Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Lincoln’s Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starry Stonewort, a new aquatic invasive species:  I want to let you know about a (new to me) threat to our Kawartha Lakes. A macro  algae has infested Lake Scugog and is now thriving in parts of Stony, notably the Lost Channel. Starry Stonewort has no roots and forms masses up to six feet deep floating below the surface.  Carol Cole, a cottager on Stony Lake writes: “It was first noticed there a couple of summers ago.  The channel is not open water really; it is more of a wetland environment.  The alga is now covering large sections of the wetland and has spread incredibly quickly into the bays on either end.  One of the bays is now almost totally covered.  It used to be a very weedy area but now it looks clear of weeds – unless you look down.  The bay at the other end isn’t quite as bad but it will be by next summer.  Both of these bays lead directly to the main boating channel of the Trent-Severn Waterway.  Both have cottages and boat traffic. Not far from the bay already covered is a wetland that has been declared provincially significant. Starry Stonewort spreads by fragmentation and the only way to stop it from spreading to other lakes is to clean, dry and drain out boats, canoes or kayaks before leaving the lake. Since this is already in Stoney Lake there isn’t anything we can do about it. All we can do now is prevent it from reaching other lakes. ”

Please spread the word! Sandra Burri, Kawartha Park, Clear Lake

Starry Stonewort from Lake Scugog – Scugog Lake Stewards photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More about Starry Stonewort:  CLIMATE CHANGE REALITY IN SCUGOG SHOULD CHANGE OUR PEOPLE-CENTRIC VIEW OF OUR LAKE. Ours is a shallow lake held at its current height by a dam at Lindsay. As a result of increased temperatures, increased storm water runoff, difficult invasive species due to our location in Southern Ontario and increased development, ours is an ecosystem that is vulnerable and susceptible to change. This year, the lake has generally been excellent for recreation and surface aesthetics because of a vast understory of the invasive alga, Starry Stonewort (SS) and abundant zebra mussels that enjoy co-habiting with SS. But is this good habitat for everything else that lives in, on or above the lake? The Stewards and our colleagues at U.O.I.T. and Kawartha Conservation are studying this new invader which seems to be spreading rapidly up throughout the hard-water Kawartha Lakes and Lake Simcoe. We have one more year in our Trillium grant funding for research, but we hope to extend our research for two more years, trying to ascertain the Ontario-wide spread and effects of this nasty invader. Use a rake to pull up a sample from the lake bottom. If you find a crunchy, green fishing line type bottom cover that is the algae — Starry Stonewort. CLEAN, DRAIN, DRY your boat before coming into, or going out of, Lake Scugog.  Scugog Lake Stewards, City of Kawartha Lakes

Cooper’s Hawk: We have a bird feeder outside our condo living room at the corner of Parkhill and Ravenwood Dr. On September 21, we were able to get this picture of a Cooper’s Hawk. We had never seen this bird before.  John & Stephanie MacDonald

Cooper’s Hawk – John MacDonald – Sept. 22 2018 – Peterborough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake: My nephew and sister came across this Eastern Hog-nosed Snake recently at Wolf Lake near Apsley. Bill Astell, Peterborough

(Note: The Eastern Hog-nosed is a species at risk in Ontario and only rarely seen. DM)

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake – via Bill Astell – Sept. 2018 – Wolf Lake near Apsley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A “dew” bath: I witnessed something absolutely new for me on the morning of September 18. At about 7:30 am, I saw two Song Sparrows giving themselves a bath in the heavy dewed grass. They burrowed down and splashed the dew on by rapidly flicking their wings onto their backs. Michael Gillespie, Keene

Song Sparrow – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandhill Cranes: It is that time again when the Sandhill Cranes begin to gather before migrating south. In the area west of Lindsay (Black School Rd area) the gathering has already started. These pictures were taken on September 18.   Tim Corner

Sandhill Cranes – Lindsay area – Sept. 18 2018 – Tim Corner

Sandhill Cranes – Sept. 18 2018 – Lindsay area – Tim Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poecila Sphinx:  On Friday, September 14, we came across the caterpillar of the Poecila Sphinx Moth (also called Northern Apple Sphinx). It measured about two inches long. We had  never seen one before.  The caterpillar was on a Sweet Gale bush, a species that dominates the banks of the Indian River near our home. This plant can be used as an insecticide, can treat scabies, used with discretion to flavour soups and stews, flavours Gale beer, repels fleas, and the roots and bark produce a yellow dye for wool.  Quite a list!  The scent on the leaves was rather faint when I checked but given the time of year that’s not surprising.    Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Poecila Sphinx Moth caterpillar on Sweet Gale – Indian River – September 2018 – Stephenie Armstrong

Poecila Sphinx Moth caterpillar on Sweet Gale shrub – Indian River – September 2018 – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Screech-Owl (via eBird):  – Reported Sep 13, 2018 20:10 by Patrick Scanlon- Indian River Road., Peterborough, Ontario- Map: – Checklist: – Comments: “Singing from the west side of the river.”

Eastern Screech-owl – Beaches area of Toronto – via Jamie Brockley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merlin: My husband, Michael, noticed this Merlin while we were having lunch on September 13. We watched it for about 10 to 15 minutes. It was looking at our bird feeder (and doing a bit of head bobbing) from the top of the umbrella of our outdoor picnic table. A few minutes  later it landed right on top of the bird feeder. Our feeder has been quite active with American Goldfinches, Purple Finches, chickadees, cardinals,  a few jays and some sparrows. The bird sort of half-heartedly swooped downward toward a scurrying squirrel before it left our yard. There were no smaller birds during the time of the visit of the Merlin. Not surprising. It was very cool!!  Helen Bested, Lynhaven Road, Peterborough

Merlin – Lynhaven Road – September 13, 2018 – Michael Bested

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Imperial Moth caterpillar: On September 7, this Imperial Moth caterpillar, a member of the Giant Silkworm Moth family, was making its way along our side path, heading for river rocks abutting a flower bed.  I gather it feeds on a variety of plants including pines and oaks which we have in abundance.  And later that day, I saw another one floating vertically, head out of water, in our small creek that empties into the Indian River. I managed to retrieve it but there was no sign of life.  I hope one day to actually see this beautifully colored moth, though it is said to be in decline.  As you have explained in your book ‘Nature’s Year’, it is extremely attracted to light making it highly visible to predators.  Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Imperial Moth caterpillar – September 2018 – Indian River – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jul 292018
 

Another fox in city dining on Gray Squirrels

There was a large number of squirrels in our neighbourhood. Then came a large, gray-coloured fox, easily the size of my fifty pound Springer Spaniel. I’d often see it at first light, and thrice seen carrying a black-phase Gray Squirrel. The squirrel population has dropped dramatically. As of July 23, I have not seen the fox for about three weeks. I presume he has moved on to another neighbourhood where the roof rabbit harvest is more promising. When I first saw the fox, I was not sure what I was looking at.  I thought perhaps it was a coyote/fox hybrid, but that probably does not happen.  Larry Love, Norwood Terrace, Peterborough

P.S. By the way, there is lots of Black Bear activity in Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park.  Last Thursday while stopping for dinner on Campsite 301 (Wolf Lake) I  saw a handwritten “Bear Warning” note, concerning a juvenile nuisance bear.  The sign was tacked to a tree at the site.   During our two hour stay, there were a number of gawkers who came into the bay to see if there was a bear around.  One kayaker told me about an MNR culvert trap set on a cottager’s property, not far from Site 301.   Two years ago, I put a small bear off of an adjacent island.  He had been gorging on blueberries.  The bears are everywhere in KHPP, but this boldness is new.

Red-headed Woodpecker at Gannons Narrow (July 21)  This is the first year we have ever seen one in the area. He has been around since early June and just in the last week or so has found our black oil sunflower seed feeders. He is a feisty fellow who will scare away the other birds and not give way to blackbirds or jays who try to get him to move. Kingsley Hubbs, Gannons Narrows, Selwyn Township

Red-headed Woodpecker – July 2018 – Kingsley Hubbs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-billed Cuckoo near Warsaw:  At around 8 pm this evening (July 20), I heard (twice) the call of a Black-billed Cuckoo in our bush near the Indian River. I didn’t see it, but its call was unmistakable. It moved to 2 different locations within the bush. We’ve been here 19 years and haven’t heard a cuckoo every year.   Jane Bremner

Black-billed Cuckoo – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) (1) from eBird
– Reported Jul 19, 2018 15:13 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Flew out from willow tree on island, landing on dead tree near sand bar. Presumably same individual reported here a few weeks back. ”

Black-crowned Night-Heron – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (4)  from eBird
– Reported Jul 17, 2018 20:50 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “1 adult, 2 young, and presumably a 3rd young calling. Adult giving steady hoot calls similar to NSOW, but mixed with clicking and whinnies. In ecology park hopping around. Seen previous night as well but only as silhouettes. ”

Eastern Screech owl – red phase – 9th Line of Selwyn Twsp – March 11, 2017 – Kathy McCue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our neighbor has a family of Mallards visiting regularly. What is remarkable, however, is that all  of the ducklings have, so far at least, survived. They have survived the Great Blue Heron that has totally cleaned out the Eastern Chipmunk population. Sad. Yeah, I know, nature. But, the maddening part, of course, is that the Great Blue is really, really lazy. He has decided to stop fishing, and go chipmunking!  Gord Young, Armour Road  

Mother Mallard and eight ducklings – Dianne Tyler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have had 3 Pileated Woodpeckers in our yard at the same time this month. However, I couldn’t get all three in the picture below. We know there are a male and a female juvenile, but we’re not sure about how many adults/parents. The Osprey nests around here all seem to only have one baby this year but its really hard to tell. We  watch the nest behind us in the ball diamond, the nest on the Bridgenorth-Selwyn Road, and the one at the corner of Yankee Line and Robinson Road across from the trailer park.  Jennie and Peter Gulliver, Communication Road, Bridgenorth

Two or the three Pileated Woodpeckers in our yard – July 16, 2018 – Jennie Gulliver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On July 12, we were camping on Secret Lake in Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park and saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes and 2 half-grown chicks foraging along a marshy shore. Secret Lake is located north of Long Lake and Loucks Lake. It is reached by a short portage from Loucks Lake. Gary Moloney

Sandhill Crane with chick – Barb Evett – Buckhorn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It seems that my leaving wide swaths of my orchard uncut to establish zones of biodiversity, which  include apple trees, nesting boxes as well as many milkweeds, has paid off. This morning, July 9, I noticed quite a few Monarchs fluttering about and visiting multiple milkweed plants that are happily blooming – having escaped the blades of my bush hog! Michael Gillespie, Keene

Monarch caterpillar on milkweed  – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have lived outside of Millbrook for 20 years & have noticed a large decline in birds and bees. I’ve also seen very few fireflies, whereas they were abundant a few years back.  Ludvik Kouril (July 9)

Photinus pyralis – a common firefly – Art Farmer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have a very large patch of Himalayan Balsam in my backyard. I’ve been fighting this invasive species for years, and I was just about to start pulling these plants out when, on July 7, I saw a Monarch laying eggs on them. Wendy Hicks, Peterborough

 N.B. Don Davis, a Monarch expert, told me that this is very unusual. D.M.

Himalayan Balsam, an invasive species in Ontario – Wikimedia

 

 

Apr 042018
 

Snowy Owl – It was snowing on Upper Buckhorn on April 6 and guess what shows up at my neighbor’s dock? Looks like a male.  Derry Fairweather

Snowy Owl – April 6, 2018- Upper Buckhorn Lake – Derry Fairweather

Snowy Owl – April 6, 2018- Upper Buckhorn Lake – Derry Fairweather

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1)
– Reported Apr 05, 2018 16:07 by Toby Rowland
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3028834,-78.31688&ll=44.3028834,-78.31688
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44277679
– Comments: “All white Wingtips significantly larger than surrounding ring billed gulls. Scene from the train bridge amongst the Ring billed gulls by the islands”

Glaucous Gull – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandhill Cranes: Our 2 Sandhill Cranes have returned to Rockcroft, north of Buckhorn. Observed in my folks backyard this morning, April 3, at 10:30 am. Marie Windover

Sandhill Cranes – Rene Gareau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Setophaga coronata coronata) (1)
– Reported Apr 06, 2018 07:16 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2938973,-78.3027537&ll=44.2938973,-78.3027537
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44291787
– Comments: “Well seen. Warbler with white throat and yellow rump. Calling consistently. Feeding alongside water just south of Beavermead beach. ”

Yellow-rumped Warbler (male) – Jeff Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii) (7)
– Reported Apr 02, 2018 10:51 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Second Line Rd pond, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1469173,-78.3458757&ll=44.1469173,-78.3458757
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44200072
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Continuing. Pic shows 2 of the 7 birds”

Cackling Goose (foreground) – Brendan Boyd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tundra Swan (Whistling) (Cygnus columbianus columbianus) (1)
– Reported Apr 02, 2018 18:10 by Matthew Tobey
– Chemong Lake – sw end, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3362125,-78.4461336&ll=44.3362125,-78.4461336
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44204127
– Comments: “Continuing.”

Tundra Swans – Apr. 6, 2014 – Luke Berg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Apr 02, 2018 09:45 by David McCorquodale
– CA-ON-341 Hiawatha Line (44.1784,-78.2037), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.178402,-78.203746&ll=44.178402,-78.203746
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44183725
– Comments: “Continuing. Out on ice.”

Snowy Owl (Jeff Keller)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandhill Cranes:  I saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes on March 23 at about 6:30pm in Omemee. Gavin Hunter

Sandhill Cranes – Don Genge

 

Jan 222018
 

On my way home from a friend’s this evening at dusk (Jan. 27 – 4:45pm) while driving through pouring rain on Co. Rd. 38 between the Dummer-Asphodel Road and Webster Road south of Warsaw, an immature Snowy Owl suddenly appeared flying along beside me at about hydro line height. It then turned and crossed the road ahead of me and came to land briefly on a utility pole, before taking flight gain and heading far out to the west until it finally disappeared from my view. This was my third of the winter and first of 2018. The one photo I snapped off doesn’t show much of anything good enough for posting. Hmm… three Snowies and still no good pictures. Will keep watching and hoping! Tim Dyson, Warsaw

Immature Snowy Owl (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bird chatter when filling feeders

I was filling my bird feeders this morning (Jan. 25), and I noted that once I had started there was a good deal of bird chatter.  Would they be communicating with each other to say “she’s filling the feeder, let’s eat”?  I’ve experienced this a few times now.  The chatter stops, lasting maybe 10 seconds or so.  Once I close my door, I noted that the birds wait, and once they feel I’m gone they go at the feeders. I have the usual birds – chickadees, finches, cardinals, etc.  Sue Ramey

NOTE: Please send me an email if you’ve noticed this phenomenon yourself. D.M. (dmonkman1@cogeco.ca)

Northern Cardinal – by Ruthanne-Sobiera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (3)
– Reported Jan 24, 2018 12:45 by Scott McKinlay
– 120 Fradette Avenue, Peterborough, Ontario, CA (44.287, -78.311), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Continuing birds along this stretch of the Otonabee. 2 males 1 female.”

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (1)
– Reported Jan 24, 2018 16:40 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “giving tremolo call frequently for ten minutes near entrance to park”

Eastern Screech-owl – red phase – 9th Line of Selwyn Twsp – March 11, 2017, Kathy McCue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (2)
– Reported Jan 24, 2018 16:40 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “very vocal pair”

Great Horned Owl at dusk (Luke Berg)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (2)
– Reported Jan 24, 2018 16:40 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “two individuals, one calling very loudly from cedars near Holy Cross, another calling loudly from cedars near trail head. Both birds could be heard hooting back and forth for 35 minutes beginning at 5pm”   LISTEN HERE

Saw-whet Owl banding – Wikimedia

Northern Saw-whet Owl – Kelly Simmonds – March 24, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On January 21, I came across an immature Red-tailed Hawk eating a Gray Squirrel on the side of Golfview Road, beside the Kawartha Golf and Country Club and right behind the Clonsilla Ave. fire station. It sure scared the jogger who happened by! The hawk wouldn’t give up his squirrel and flew off with it into the woods. Mark Scriver

Immature Red-tailed Hawk eating Gray Squirrel – Jan. 21, 2018 – Golfview Rd. – Mark Scriver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have two Sandhill Cranes that I’ve seen twice and heard once in the past week. I have cranes here every spring, summer and fall, but am surprised that they’d be around at this time of the year.  Leo Condon, 947 Douro 4th Line 

Sandhill Cranes – Wendy Leszkowicz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Jan 23, 2018 07:49 by Scott Gibson
– Downtown – Robinson Place roof, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “feeding on pigeon on corner of roof”

Peregrine perched on steel girder – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
– Reported Jan 22, 2018 08:50 by Ben Taylor
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42155983
– Comments: “Continuing bird,”

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (2)
– Reported Jan 21, 2018 14:12 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42151124
– Comments: “Continuing birds: male and female”

Female Red-breasted Merganser (Karl Egressy)

Red-breasted Merganser on Otonabee River -Tom Northey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) (1)
– Reported Jan 21, 2018 14:20 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Otonabee River (Lock 19), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42151121
– Comments: “Continuing bird. Only male seen, among mallards just below lock on west side of river”

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (2)
– Reported Jan 21, 2018 16:15 by René Gareau
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Heard an owl calling, and 20 min. later located two great horned owls approx. 50 ft up a tree in north-east portion of Harper Park (south of Holy Cross school running track) at approx. 5:00 p.m. on Jan. 21.” 

Great Horned Owl – Karl Egressy

Harper Park in the south end of Peterborough is a natural treasure – Drew Monkman

Jan 192018
 

We have been getting a pair of Red-bellied Woodpeckers for the last 2 years. We also had a sighting of a Red-headed Woodpecker this past September (2017). I feed all year so we get a lot of different birds here. I also sighted a pair of Sandhill Cranes in September. We are just north of Millbrook on Fallis Line. Ab Parsons

Red-headed Woodpecker – May 28, 2017 – Buckhorn Lake -Nima Taghaboni

Virginia Opossum in Ennismore – 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virginia Opossums: We have 3 opossums living in our garage/hut –  a father, mother and baby. The male is a big white one; the female is grey and the baby is grey. The baby is about half the size of the mother. We live near Rice Lake on Wood Duck Drive on the north shore of Rice Lake. They are wandering around probably in the wooded area behind us which is owned by Southview Cottages. Sandy Kirkland

Virginia Opossum – Rice Lake – Jan. 2018 – Sandy Kirkwood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 10:30 by Ryan Hill
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “just off main road, a bit north of the gate”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

 

 

Red_Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (3)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 10:30 by Ryan Hill
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 14:48 by Toby Rowland
– Lakefield- Lakefield Marshland, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41807307
– Comments: “Continuing female WWSC from the report yesterday. Amongst mixed male and female COGO – will add photos ”

White-winged Scoter on Otonabee River – Tom Northey – Feb. 2, 2014

Male Red-breasted Merganser (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
– Reported Jan 09, 2018 15:33 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41804772
– Comments: “long bill, green head, shaggy back of head, brown breast band; swimming in open water opposite Beavermead Park”

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 15:30 by Ben Taylor
– feeder on County Rod 6, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “continuing bird at house at 3372 County Road Six. Actively feeding at feeder”

Sparrow-like female Rose-breasted Grosbeak – Cindy Bartoli

Male White-winged Crossbill – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White-winged Crossbill (Loxia leucoptera) (4)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 09:30 by Chris Risley
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Heard and then saw flying over trees. Distinctive chips checked with recording online. Familiar with these chips”

On January 9, we had 15 American Robins at our house in Campbellford.  Donald Munro

American Robins feeding on Wild Grape – Beavermead Park – Feb. 7, 2016 – Helen & Larry Keller –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While having morning coffee, this Cooper’s Hawk swept down to the deck and caught a Mourning Dove having a drink at the heated bird bath. Took over an hour for her to finish her meal and leave.  Sue Paradisis 

Cooper’s Hawk eating Mourning Dove – January 2018 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-winged Blackbird, male, spotted in the morning on January 12th, at my feeder on George Street in Lakefield. Don’t usually see these until March! John Dandrea

Red-winged Blackbirds – Dec. 23, 2017 – Fife Line _ Michael Gillespie

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker – Campbellford – January 2017 – Donald Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker: (Observed Jan. 7, 2018) We live at the corner of Centre Road and County Rd 32, aka River Road. This is the first Red-bellied for us. Luba Klama

Dec 182017
 

 

Bald Eagle:  We live on the Sixth Line of Selwyn (right behind Paris Marine). I spotted this adult Bald eagle in the tree beside our house on Monday, December 18. Hope you enjoy it. Heather Turner

BAEA – Dec. 18, 2017 – Paris Marine, Selwyn Twsp – Heather Turner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-winged Blackbirds:  My “ long overdue to leave”, so-called friends. They sometimes number over 30! (Dec. 23, 2017) Michael Gillespie, David Fife Line, Keene

Red-winged Blackbirds – Dec. 23, 2017 – Fife Line _ Michael Gillespie

 

This morning, there was a pair of Red-winged Blackbirds at my bird feeder. I live just east of Westwood, between Keene and Hastings, and have never noticed red-winged blackbirds here at this time of year before. Is this the new normal? Debbie Lynch, Westwood

N.B.  Not the new normal, but more than usual this winter. Most years at this time there are a few reported, but usually less than five. They may be part of the same flock that has shown up on Fife Line. D.M.

RWBLs – Dec. 23, 2017 – Debbie Lynch

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) (1)
– Reported Dec 22, 2017 10:00 by Dave Milsom
– 1093 Scollard Drive, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3412121,-78.3001087&ll=44.3412121,-78.3001087
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41253932
– Comments: “female made very brief visit this morning”

Note: Also seen December 24.

Ring-necked Pheasant – female -Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Ravens: On December 22, at 250 Lindsay Road, between Craftworks and Pawz-N-Train, I saw 30 ravens circling above the silo on a barn. David Beaucage-Johnson

Common Raven – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolina Wren (Northern) (Thryothorus ludovicianus [ludovicianus Group]) (1)
– Reported Dec 20, 2017 13:11 by Matthew Tobey
– Matthew’s Backyard, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41220532
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Visited feeder for a brief period; flew off before I could get a decent record shot.”

Carolina Wren (Wikimedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharp-shinned Hawk: I’m quite distraught, because a Sharp-shinned Hawk flew straight into one of our windows on December 16. Had a quick demise. This happened close to the bird feeder, which was well populated at the time.  Jill Stocker, Millbrook

Sharp-shinned Hawk – window collision – Millbrook – Dec. 16, 2017 – Jill Stocker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woodpeckers and a shrike: I had a Red-bellied Woodpecker (male) at the suet feeder and sunflower feeder yesterday and today (Dec. 17, 18). Pretty exciting -and hard to miss. It seems like all the woodpeckers – Pileated, Hairy and Downy – have been pretty active the past few days. On Dec. 21, I also had a visit from a Northern Shrike! Annamarie Beckel, Lakefield

Red-bellied Woodpecker – Lynde Creek, Whitby- Photo by Brian Crangle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opossums and Robins: We have had visitation since late summer of a pair of Opossums….rather unusual creatures…. rather comical the way they walk and run off when you talk to them….we haven’t had problem with raccoons since they came and they don’t seem to bother our rabbits that come all year for a date wrapped in whole wheat bread…… some of my most loveable friends have been the robins we have. One we call Robbie Robin… he picked up on the feeding of rabbits in early spring and took a taste for the dates they were getting from us, so he now perches on the rail outside the patio doors, waiting for the next treat… this also lead to grapes, raisins and apples … he would come maybe 6 times a day …if we didn’t go out he started coming to the patio doors and looking in… this has been going on for 3 years……he is different than the other robins in that he has some feathers that seem to be sticking out on one side of his body…. just a few of my memories for spring, summer and fall and winter… we have the Opossum still and our lovely rabbits….. we are located on the north side of Rice Lake in the Bailieboro area on the lake……. we also have an otter and a beaver that eats cedar hedges!  Esther Ross

Opossum on Johnston Drive, south of Peterborough – Mary Beth Aspinall – Feb. 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca) (2)
– Reported Dec 17, 2017 10:13 by Scott Gibson
– aa_Peterborough – Edmison Rd right-of-way, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “first birds of the day! both in same spot, 200m in from end of Edmison Rd.”

Fox Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandhill Crane (Antigone canadensis) (1)
– Reported Dec 17, 2017 10:00 by Scott McKinlay
– Peterborough, Ontario, CA (44.225, -78.293), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “I saw this bird through my Kowa scope from considerable distance (1km?) as it was flying over an open field in full sunlight . It had broad wings and slow arching wing beats typial of large herons and cranes, and it was clearly brown in colour, even at that distance. I was reluctant to call it because of the distance and time of year, but nothing else fit. This was during our Peterborough Christmas bird count and when I reunited with the rest of the group for our sector, who had been surveying the area in the direction of my sighting, the first thing they said, before hearing about my sighting, was that they had seen what looked like a sandhill crane. They described it as being the size of a blue heron, with an outstretched neck and long trailing legs. All three birders were adamant that it was not a blue heron, and that it was lighter in colour than a blue heron. They had viewed it while it was flying low over fields just ahead and of and to the side of the car they were travelling in. They followed it and then got out of the car to watch it in binoculars as it continued to fly in my general direction. There are no photos.”

Sandhill Crane (Wikimedia)

Great Blue Heron (Paul Anderson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Screech-Owl (Northern) (Megascops asio [asio Group]) (1)
– Reported Dec 17, 2017 07:50 by Matthew Tobey
– Peterborough CBC Area 7, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Mervin Ln.”

Eastern Screech-owl – red phase – 9th Line of Selwyn Twsp – March 11, 2017, Kathy McCue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Shrike (Lanius borealis) (2)
– Reported Dec 17, 2017 08:30 by Scott McKinlay
– Bensfort Road Landfill Site, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist:

Northern Shrike (Lanius borealis) (1)
– Reported Dec 17, 2017 10:13 by Scott Gibson
– aa_Peterborough – Edmison Rd right-of-way, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “middle of marsh”

Northern Shrike – Tom Northey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) (1)
– Reported Dec 17, 2017 07:36 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough CBC Area 2, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Snow Bunting (from Crossley ID Guide)


		
Dec 082017
 

N.B. Whenever I refer to “home”, it is between Warsaw and Lakefield, south of the Sawer Creek Wetland.

Passerines and other birds and animals.

  • A Yellow-billed Cuckoo flew over my kayak as I began to paddle up the Indian River from Back Dam Park at Warsaw on September 9th. It called twice upon landing across the river.
  • This was the last date I saw the Great Egret that I had originally discovered there on August 5th.
  • Two Red Crossbills were also seen and heard a little way up the river on that day, and others were seen and/or heard several times over the course of the fall at Warsaw, at home, and spots around Stoney Lake, Northey’s Bay Road, and Nepthon. No real “flocks” as yet, but birds numbered from one to six individuals when encountered. Most recent were six at home on December 5th.
  • An American Pipit was skulking about in a pasture south of Long Lake, NW of Warsaw, on September 28th.
  • Pine Siskins have been occasional from early October to present. With the exception of 40+ birds seen near Warsaw on November 22nd, (and not unlike the crossbills that have been around), siskin numbers remain rather low.
  • On October 26th, at Nephton Ridge, I saw my last Monarch of the year. It was #532 for 2017, which is more than double my previous highest annual count since I began counting them seven years ago. Of the 532, 31 were observed as road fatalities.
  • Also on October 26th, I heard a Greater Yellowlegs call before dawn from the starry sky above at home, and another near Nephton Ridge later that morning.
  • One Tundra Swan with nine Canada Geese was seen flying overhead at home on October 27th, 28th and 30th. A lone Tundra Swan flew over the same location on November 2nd. I wondered if it was the one who had been flying with the nine geese?
  • On September 24th, I stepped out of dense cedars into a pasture and found myself very close to two Sandhill Cranes. They seemed at ease as long as I stayed in motion, just walking about as they were. Whenever I stopped or crouched, they moved away from me.

  • The loud calling of just over 300 Sandhill Cranes in two groups on Nov. 17th was heard as the birds were heading westward over my house. I photographed each entire flock at wide angle so I could later zoom the images on the computer and get an exact count. The first flock at 2:13pm numbered 173 birds and the second group four minutes later contained 128 for a combined total of 301 cranes. These birds were very likely the same, or associated with the large groups that Bill Buddle had reported at about 2:30pm the same day over Lakefield.

  • Ed Heuvel and I saw a much smaller flock of seven birds over his house between Cottesloe and Norwood on Nov. 23rd.
  • No doubt due to the warmth of early December, two Eastern Chipmunks were seen running across Round Lake Road north of Havelock on December 4th. They had all but disappeared not too long ago, and I’ve now seen five back out just this month.
  • Another warm weather sighting was of a Leopard Frog hopping across the yard at home on December 5th. I took some photos, and half an hour later, it was nowhere to be found.

  • On December 8th 2017, Ed Heuvel reported a road-killed Virginia Opossum he had just seen along Hwy 7 south of Sherbrooke Street.

   Raptors of interest

  • On September 11th, an immature Peregrine appeared amidst twenty-four kettling Turkey Vultures NW of Warsaw. The falcon harassed a couple of the vultures before peeling off on its own, heading SW.

  • As is my habit if I am out in the yard after dark during the fall or winter, I called for owls. From about the 24th of September until about the 3rd of November, Saw-whet Owls move about during their annual fall migration. The first that responded to my calls this year was a single bird on September 29th. On October 18th, however, no less than four of the little owls showed up inside of about a minute of my first attempt at calling. One was in the spruces to the east of the yard, while the other three were surrounding me, within the small grove of apple trees where I stood. With the three of them looking at each other more than at me, I found it easy to take some photos of the two that were closest to me, (about two metres away).
  • Dates later than the average “end date” of their normal migration that I have called one in this year have been November 8th, 12th, 27th and December 1st. These likely represent one or more wintering birds, and all have been at home near Warsaw.

  • Ed Heuvel flushed a Short-eared Owl from the ground on the morning of Oct. 17th on his 40 acre property NW of Norwood while out for a walk with his dog. Ed has turned what was once a sloping old field into a thriving tallgrass prairie, having seeded it with many native prairie plant species. I thought it quite fitting for such a bird to turn up in this “new” prairie grassland habitat. Good one, Ed!!
  • Paddling up the Indian River from Back Dam again on October 21st, Angela and I saw a few good raptors during our time on the water. First was an immature Northern Goshawk flying overhead, and then, about two minutes later, an immature Cooper’s Hawk following almost the exact same “path”. A while later, paddling back downstream, Angela spotted an adult male Merlin as it perched in the dead top branches of a spruce. Driving back through Warsaw, a Red-tailed Hawk soared low over the village. We headed up Payne’s Line towards home and spotted the first Golden Eagle of the season (a sub-adult bird) slowly soaring not far from the large metal tower there. We took a few photos and headed home. The next day, I saw another (immature this time) Golden Eagle fly over, east to west, from the yard at home.

  • I was accompanied by three friends, (Drew Monkman, Martin Parker, and Ed Heuvel) on Oct. 26th for a few hours of raptor watching in the Nephton Ridge/Kosh Lake area at the east end of County Road #6. My one intent for the day was to point out to Drew, his first “Ontario” Golden Eagle. Well, unless the “eagle sp.” we saw that morning was a Golden, we did not see one. However, we were treated to 8 Bald Eagles which, apart from one 4th winter bird, all were adults. At one point, four adult Balds soared together directly overhead. A while later, two adults came along together, and after that, another by itself. Since there was such a lack of immature eagles, and the fact that four adults had come from different directions, soared a while together, and then dispersed somewhat northward… we questioned how many of them might have actually even been migrants, or perhaps local breeding birds. Additional raptors for the day were five Red-tailed Hawks, and two (one adult and one immature) Red-shouldered Hawks.

  • Just after 11:00am on Nov. 11th a group of large birds caught my eye to the north of the house. On closer inspection, I could see three Common Ravens dive-bombing an immature Golden Eagle. I watched them for several minutes before the ravens went east and the eagle, west.

  • On October 29th a dark morph Rough-legged Hawk was seen perched in a tree along County Rd #6 just west of Camp Line. It was the first of the season for me, and since, I’ve seen another eight Rough-legs between Norwood and Lakefield. Of the nine seen so far, three have been dark morph birds.
  • Having had seen no immature Bald Eagles during the autumn season as yet, on the morning of Nov. 17th, two 1st winter birds, and then a 2nd winter bird appeared soaring over my yard in a ten-minute period. They all seemed to come from the west, and once a considerable altitude was reached, they each headed off in completely different directions. I suspect that they had all spent some time feeding together, and were now dispersing. It was only two days after the annual rifle deer hunt had ended, and I wondered if they had just dined on the gut pile of a deer left somewhere by hunters.
  • The great backyard birding continued on November 26th, as no sooner had I sat in the yard with my morning coffee, an immature Northern Goshawk flew from east to west. If that wasn’t enough, my fourth Golden Eagle of the season (an adult) appeared over the forest to the east, soared two circles, and headed back east just after noon.
  • Nov. 29th an adult rufous morph Red-tailed Hawk soared over the yard. I had to run in and get the scope as it looked not like a typical Red-tail. The rusty-red undersides and the dark brown back were easily seen with the optics. It had been a long time since I’ve seen this variety of the species.
  • On the night of December 01 – 02, after calling at home for Screech, Saw-whet, and Boreal Owls, (the latter, because you never know if you don’t try), I finally stirred an Eastern Screech Owl who called for quite a while afterwards. And briefly, a Northern Saw-whet Owl answered my calls with the “tew, tew, tew” call. About an hour later, just after mid-night, while bringing in some firewood, the pair of Northern Barred Owls that live on the property year-round, began calling with hoots which soon morphed into their monkey-like “whacka, whacka, whacka” calls. Not too bad for spending a little time in the yard after dark!!
  • Just after 2:00pm on December 6th, I saw a large, pale bird far out to the east, soaring in wide circles. It appeared gull-like as it moved quite fast in the strong winds. I got the scope on it just before it passed in behind the treetops and out of my view. Revealed by the scope was the darkish under-body contrasting with entirely white undersides of the wings of an immature Snowy Owl. Unless my memory is misfiring, this would be the first of this species I have seen this century. If that wasn’t enough stimulation for one day, a little over an hour later, I saw a second Snowy for the day as it flew into strong south winds at 3:15pm. The latter bird was decidedly whiter than the first, with very few dark markings. The first bird simply would not show up in the photos I took, (too far), and the camera was nowhere near me as I watched the second owl sail past much closer. Both were heading in a north-to-south direction, lending a little support to the idea that they might have been in migration at the time.
  • On December 7th while I still lay in bed, through the window next to me, I spotted a 1st winter Bald Eagle fly past over the trees to the east. It soared briefly and then continued on in a SE direction.
  • While moving the fallen foliage around with the leaf blower on December 8th at home, I looked up, (as I find I constantly am doing these days) and saw two large, dark birds very high almost straight above me. Before I was able to grab the scope, I could see that they were eagles. Once in focus, the white bases of tails and primaries with all other plumage completely dark, identified them both as 1st winter Golden Eagles. A strong and steady SW wind pushed them NW of me. They were only about ten wingspans (about 20 m) apart and one was just a little ahead of the other. They slowed briefly once or twice, but never paused to soar while I had them in view.

1st winter Golden Eagle – USFWS

Tim Dyson – Warsaw

Nov 142017
 

I sent you a note about this time last year about a small flock of Sandhill Cranes passing over Lakefield. Well, this year they have been joined by some friends. At about 2:30 this afternoon, November 17, about 4 flocks of the size of the group in the picture passed over Lakefield, some calling with the deep rolling kr-r-r-oo as described in an old Peterson guide book. One big flock circled about for awhile south of us – probably up over the Lakefield quarry – until it reformed into two or three smaller flocks and then they followed a couple of groups that passed about 10 minutes earlier and seemed to be heading west to northwest. There were probably over 200 birds in total…. a wonderful sight.  Bill Buddle

Sandhill Cranes – November 17, 2017 – Lakefield – Bill Buddle

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Nov 14, 2017 09:58 by Travis Cameron
– Lakefield (General), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Flying west over County Road 29 ~250m south of Maples Corners.”

An immature Snowy Owl in flight – probably a female (Karl Egressy)

 

We are witnessing scores of Mourning Doves this fall here near Bailieboro, ON. We’re in the country, so we’re used to these birds, but this is unbelievable. They are in at least two flocks. I counted 30 in one. And they eat berries; just ask my car. L. Harries

Mourning Dove – Karl Egressy

 

Here’s a picture of three Trumpeter Swans (two adults and one juvenile) that I photographed on Upper Buckhorn Lake on Nov. 12, 2017.  Derry Fairweather

Trumpeter Swans – November 12, 2017 – Buckhorn Lake – Derry Fairweather

 

I had a Yellow-rumped Warbler at my feeder yesterday, November 12. Hopefully , the seeds will sustain/attract it until December 1st for the official winter bird list! So far, the resident Red-bellied Woodpecker has ignored the suet and chooses the feeder seeds every time. It is certainly a different behaviour for a woodpecker. Michael Gillespie, Keene

Yellow-rumped Warbler at feeder – Nov. 28, 2014 Franmor Dr. Ptbo – Sue Prentice

 

I found this lovely Witch Hazel blooming in a wild area of Ecology Park today, November 12. It could so easily be overlooked! I read that they bloom at this time of year in order to take advantage of the lack of competition for the few flies and moths that are still active. We did see both that day.   Sue Paradisis

Witch Hazel 2 – Ecology Park – Nov. 13, 2017 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

Witch Hazel – Ecology Park – Nov. 13, 2017 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

 

Dec 232016
 

Just wanted to let you know that I saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes in the Miller Creek Conservation Area (7th Line of Selwyn) in August 2016. It was great to seem them up close, standing near a beaver lodge.

Ian Bothwell

Note: At least one pair of cranes has been nesting here in recent years. See photo. D.M.

Adult and juvenile Sandhill Cranes in early summer (Gary Aitken)

Adult and juvenile Sandhill Crane in early summer in field adjacent to Miller Creek C.A. (Gary Aitken)

Dec 102016
 

On December 10 at 3:20 pm, five Sandhill Cranes flew over my house on Highway 7 in Havelock. They were flying from south to north.

Ulrike Kullik, Havelock

Flock of Sandhill Cranes in flight (photo by Jerry Friedman)

Flock of Sandhill Cranes in flight (photo by Jerry Friedman)

Sandhill Crane (Wikimedia)

Sandhill Crane (Wikimedia)

Dec 072016
 

I just want to let you know that the Sandhill Crane reported by Gavin Hunter on November 28 was still present this morning (December 6). It is in a field kitty corner to the church at the junction of Buckhorn Road and Curve Lake Road.

David Beaucage Johnson

Sandhill Cranes - Wendy-Leszkowicz

Sandhill Cranes – Wendy-Leszkowicz

Nov 272016
 

On November 26, I saw a Sandhill Crane land in a field kitty corner from the church at the corner of Curve Lake Road and County Road 23, south of Buckhorn.

Gavin Hunter

Sandhill Crane in flight - Wikimedia

Sandhill Crane in flight – Wikimedia

 

Nov 052016
 

Yesterday, November 4, around 4 pm, a flock of Sandhill Cranes flew over Lakefield. They flew from the south and seemed to be heading NW. We estimate over 30 birds. They were followed by a small flock of about 10 a few minutes later. Wonderful sight and sound.

Flock of Sandhill Cranes in flight (photo by Jerry Friedman)

Flock of Sandhill Cranes in flight (photo by Jerry Friedman)

Sandhill Crane (Wikimedia)

Sandhill Crane (Wikimedia)

Bill Buddle

Nov 032016
 

On October 26, while raising a dock for a client on Quarry Bay on the north shore of Stoney Lake at early dusk, I paused a moment when I thought I heard Sandhill Cranes. A few seconds later, I could hear them again, and looked up at what had to be the largest flock of cranes I had ever seen. They were heading west, before turning slightly north/west, and were about 800 metres up flying in a “V” formation, not unlike geese typically do. They were close together, and difficult to count at first, but once 19 of them broke free from the rest into two groups of their own, I was able to count the entire flock in the three groups. They numbered 7, 12, and 43 for a grand total of 62 birds in the entire bunch!

Tim Dyson,
Stoney Lake

Sandhill Crane in flight - Wikimedia

Sandhill Crane in flight – Wikimedia

Sandhill Cranes - Wendy-Leszkowicz

Sandhill Cranes – Wendy Leszkowicz

Sep 072016
 

I observed twice this week a pair of Sandhill Cranes flying to and from the Omemee pond (enlargement in Pigeon River on south edge of Omemee). One time they were also calling from the pond.

Gavin Hunter, Omemee

Sandhill Cranes (Karl Egressy)

Sandhill Cranes (Karl Egressy)

Jun 262016
 

Here is a photo of 2 Sandhill Cranes that I photographed on Saturday, June 18. They were on the west side of Northeys Road between the 13th & 14th lines of Selwyn Township, west of Young’s Point. These are the only Sandhill Cranes I have seen in this region

Roy T. Bowles
705-652-7946

Sandhill Cranes - Northey Road - Selwyn Twsp - June 18, 2016 - Roy Bowles

Sandhill Cranes – Northeys Road – Selwyn Twsp – June 18, 2016 – Roy Bowles

May 052016
 

May 5 – Mike Barker had a White-crowned Sparrow at his feeder on Algonquin Blvd in Peterborough.

May 4 – Marie Windover had a Whip-poor-will calling from 8:30 to 9:00 PM near her home on County Road 507. She also has a pair of Sandhill Cranes that appear to be nesting in a field across from her parents’ house in the same area.

May 2 – Janet Duval, who lives on Deer Bary Reach on the north side of Lower Buckhorn, sent me a picture of six River Otters on her neighbour’s dock (Jim Franklin). Apparently there are 10 in total. He confirms that they are “busy as beavers”.  See photo below.

May 1 – John Fautley saw a Caspian Tern on a rock in the Otonabee River, across from Peterborough Manor.

April 28 – Gwen Forsyth had two swans (Trumpeters, she believes) in the pond at the corner of Television Road and Hwy 7 east.  No tags were apparent on either bird.

Trumpeter Swans - Gwen Forsyth

Trumpeter Swans on Television Road Pond – April 27, 2016 – Gwen Forsyth

Whip-poor-will 1 (Karl Egressy)

Whip-poor-will 1 (Karl Egressy)

White-crowned Sparrow - Mike Barker

White-crowned Sparrow – May 5, 2016 – Mike Barker

Trumpeter Swan - Gwen Forsyth

Trumpeter Swan – April 27, 2016 – Gwen Forsyth

Caspian Tern - Karl Egressy

Caspian Tern – Karl Egressy

Otters on Franklin dock on Lower Buckhorn Lake - April 27, 2016 (photo by Jim Franklin)

Otters on Franklin dock on Lower Buckhorn Lake – April 27, 2016 (photo by Jim Franklin)

 

 

 

 

 

Apr 082016
 

We returned to our home on Dodworth Island on Stony Lake on Monday and immediately filled the four feeders. The activity is the most ever….We have 10 usual species but two things stand out. There are no Common Redpolls, but we have over 50 Pine Siskins. At least one Osprey is back..no loons here yet. The ice went out on April 1.  Rob Welsh

NOTE:  Pine Siskins are showing up in large numbers all over Peterborough and the Kawarthas right now. Flocks of 60+ have come to our feeder in recent days, along with close to a dozen Purple Finches. Drew Monkman

I was about to send out an APB. However, this evening around 5 pm. our pair of Common Loons finally arrived (Buckhorn Lake near Six Foot Bay) . Unfortunately, our “lone loon”, who usually arrives before them (as early as April 1) hasn’t appeared yet. Fingers crossed he’s ok.  Toni Sinclair, Buckhorn Lake

On April 6, I had 12-15 Purple Finches at our feeder for most of the day. No, they were not House Finches! Mostly females but at least 4 showy males.   Jim Cashmore, Wallis Drive, Peterborough

I heard the first Spring Peeper chorus for me this year, on March 31 @ 9th Line and County Road 32 (east bank along Otonabee towards Lakefield). Susan Chow

I saw my first Mourning Cloak butterfly on March 27,  just south of Keene.  Michael Gillespie

On the Indian River outside Warsaw, we heard an Eastern Phoebe calling March 28 at about 8:30 am – our harbinger of Spring!  Jane Bremner, Warsaw

Jerry Ball and I covered some of the side roads off Hwy 507 in the northern part of Trent Lakes Municipality and found Compton Tortoiseshell butterflies on three different roads. Martin Parker

We’ve had a weasel around all winter (a Long-tailed, we think), but never managed to get a photo until Easter Sunday, March 23… its white winter coat has started changing. Gwen Forsyth, Lakefield

I saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes on March 23. They were flying northeast over Centre Line of Smith at the 7th Line.  Jim Watt, Peterborough

I was outside March 23 cleaning the snow off the deck and about 20 feet above my head flew this magnificent adult Bald Eagle. He went upwards and landed on top of the pine tree on our point. Waited there for about ten minutes.  Derry Fairweather, Upper Buckhorn Lake

Today, March 22, my wife saw a pair of Gray Squirrels mating in our yard. It seems far too late, since Gray Squirrels give birth to their first litter this month. I haven’t been able to find a reference to mating in March anywhere online. Drew Monkman

Bald Eagle - March 23, 2016 Derry Fairweather

Bald Eagle – March 23, 2016 Derry Fairweather

Compton Tortoiseshell - Wikimedia

Compton Tortoiseshell – Wikimedia

Long-tailed Weasel - March 23 - Gwen Forsyth

Long-tailed Weasel – March 23 – Gwen Forsyth

Mourning Cloak - Maple Cr. - Apr. 2014 - Drew Monkman

Mourning Cloak – Maple Cr. – Apr. 2014 – Drew Monkman

 

Pine Siskin (by Karl Egressy)

Pine Siskin (by Karl Egressy)

Eastern Phoebe at nest - David Frank

Eastern Phoebe at nest – David Frank

 

Mar 192016
 

On March 18, I was driving south on Fenel Rd, southeast of Kirkfield. I crossed Highway 48 still southbound by Goosebay Road and the intersection of Islay Road, where I saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes flying over the fields at about 6:45 PM.

Gavin Hunter

Sandhill Cranes - Rene Gareau

Sandhill Cranes – Rene Gareau

Sandhill Crane (Wikimedia)

Sandhill Crane (Wikimedia)

May 292015
 

Location: Woodland Camp Site – Upper Buckhorn Lake
Date: May 27, 2015
Time: 10:15 AM

A pair of Sandhill Cranes were grazing in front of my camper this AM. I scrambled to grab my camera…but the sun was not in the right spot for a great shot. This is the first I’ve seen of sandhills…… quite a thrill! The chick was gawky and adorable. Apparently they regularly wind their way through camp once the campers clear out on Sundays. Hope to see them again.

Barb Evett

Sandhill Crane with chick - Barb Evett - Buckhorn

Sandhill Crane with chick – Barb Evett – Woodland Camp Site

May 152015
 

I took these pics in Cavan Township on May 15, 2015, on my way to the dump. They were on Hutchison Drive, which is just west of the Cavan Transfer Station on Syer Line (8th). The pair of Sandhill Cranes were looking at the Coyote as he finally showed himself, but they flew away in time. I watched the Coyote for about 5 minutes in the bush line watching the birds and trying to get closer. They couldn’t
see him at that time. Pretty cool.  Wayne and Annie Stovell

Sandhill Cranes – May 15, 2015 – Hutchison Drive – Cavan Township – Wayne Stovell

Eastern Coyote – May 15, 2015 – Hutchison Drive – Cavan Township – Wayne Stovell

 

Apr 212015
 

A pair of Sandhill Cranes were seen yesterday on the west side of County Road 507, just south of Charlie Allen Road. They have been present in this area for several years. I still have a pair of Gray Jays that are coming to my feeder as well. I am looking forward to hearing the first Whip-poor-wills in the coming days!

Marie Windover, 2167 Cty Rd 507

Sandhill Crane - Apr. 7, 2015 Nima Taghaboni

Sandhill Crane – Apr. 7, 2015 Nima Taghaboni

Apr 082015
 

This morning (April 7) there were two Sandhill Cranes on a corn field off of North School Rd. Also, I finally caught site of a Barred Owl fter all the sightings that have occurred in the Kawarthas this past winter. It was perched by the ditch on the corner of Hwy 28 and County Rd 6. The American Kestrel was feeding on a mouse on Hwy 28 at Center Road.

Nima Taghaboni

Sandhill Crane - Apr. 7, 2015 Nima Taghaboni

Sandhill Crane – Apr. 7, 2015 Nima Taghaboni

 

Kestrel - Apr. 7, 2015 Nima Taghaboni

Kestrel – Apr. 7, 2015 Nima Taghaboni

May 202014
 

Here is a picture of two sandhill cranes that Antje and I have seen several times over the past four days in a field beside County Road 6, just a bit west of County Road 40 (about 5 minutes away from my cottage on Stony Lake). They have been feeding regularly in this field, about 50-60 feet from the roadside, and are easily visible from County Road 6. Today, I came prepared with my camera and binoculars, so I was able to have a really good look at them and take some pictures.

Rene Gareau

Sandhill Cranes - Rene Gareau

Sandhill Cranes – Rene Gareau