Aug 102018
 

Increased sightings of Monarchs and frogs 

Every summer we feel lucky if we see one Monarch Butterfly, but on August 26 I was treated to the sight of two butterflies feeding up on Joe-Pye Weed for several hours alongside the river bank.  They seemed to be working as a team, getting ready for their long journey south.  Maybe next year we’ll see more. This year our frog count has gone up, having been on the low side for a few of years.  On August 24 we counted eight Green Frogs in the shallow creek that drains into the river and there are three Grey Treefrogs residing in and around our house deck.  This one almost looks like its smiling. Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Monarchs on Joe-Pye Weed – August 2018 – Peter Armstrong

Gray Treefrog with green coloration – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Frog – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sightings from Roadsend Farm

On the weekend of August 19, my husband and I saw a very light coloured Ruby-throated hummingbird (leucistic) at one of our feeders. Although we have no flowers, except for day lilies at the front, we are inundated by hummers every year.  Ed puts up and maintains nine feeders spread around our large backyard and so each year I guess the word goes out…Go to McAuleys! The battles at the living room window feeders are amazing.

I’ve been following the Smilax plants each year, since I first told you about them. Last year we had butternuts like crazy, but none this year. Nor any apples, no elderberries, no fruit on the Ironwood trees and very few hawthorn or buckthorn berries. Last year we had several dozen morels but none this year. No puffballs this year or last, either.  We did, however, have the first bittersweet I’ve seen in two decades. I know that is what nature does, but it’s still amazing and somewhat distressing.  Darienne McAuley, Roadsend Farm

Smilax – These berries will soon start to darken, until they are all navy blue – August 2018 – Darienne McAuley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monarch migration underway

On August 30, I drove down to the shore of Lake Ontario, just west of Port Hope at Port Britain. Monarch migration was in full-swing. Standing on the shoreline, Talulah Mullally and I watched a steady stream of Monarchs flying from east to west. In the space of 15 minutes, at least 80 individuals flew by. Winds were light and the temperature was probably about 20 C. Drew Monkman

Monarch on Buddleia (butterfly bush) at Millennium Park – photo by Ben Wolfe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trumpeter Swans

There are two beautiful mature Trumpeter Swans and 1 juvenile half their size… been hanging around here for over a week. Buckhorn Lake down Kawartha Hideaway Road to 2nd causeway. Look to the left out in the bay.  Jane Philpott

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shorebird migration continues

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (1)
– Reported Aug 30, 2018 11:35 by Dave Milsom
– Otonabee Gravel Pit Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Least Sandpiper – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pectoral Sandpiper (Calidris melanotos) (1)
– Reported Aug 29, 2018 07:40 by Iain Rayner
– Bridgenorth–Yankee Line pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “About KILL size with yellow legs, short decurved beak and heavy dark head and breast with abrupt change to white on mid breast.”

Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) (2)
– Reported Aug 29, 2018 07:40 by Iain Rayner
– Bridgenorth–Yankee Line pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Greyish peeps with a lot of white on head and contrasting supercillium, short thick bill, wing tips same length as tail. Quite comfortably feeding in water up to their belly. Leg colour not obvious at that distance.”

Pectoral Sandpiper – Wikimedia

Semipalmated Sandpipers – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This great summer for Monarchs continues!

No doubt people have seen many Monarch butterfly larvae this season; however I was excited to see seven large ones on our Butterfly Milkweed plant (August 26). Just wanted to share! Gwen McMullen, Warsaw

Caterpillars on Butterfly Milkweed – Gwen McMullen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Backyard hummingbird action in Peterborough

I just had to send you these photos I managed to get last evening (August 24) from a feeder hung in our birch tree by the deck. I’m thrilled because we don’t get many hummingbird visitors but clearly patience pays off! I now know how wildlife photographers feel when they get a shot after hours of waiting! Wendy Marrs, Ridgewood Road

Note: This is the first summer we’ve had hummingbirds coming to our feeders on Maple Crescent in Peterborough all summer long. We are now seeing at least one juvenile bird, so it appears that the hummers nested. D.M.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird – Wendy Marrs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nighthawk migration is under way
Now’s the time to be looking for migrating Common Nighthawks. The best time to see flocks is late afternoon and evening. They feed as they fly and are often seen over water. In my experience, they often turn up after a rain event. A great location to view from is the Indian River near/at Back Dam Park on Rock Road, just outside of Warsaw. On the evening of August 20, I saw 77 nighthawks between 6:30 and 7:45 pm. They were appearing in the NW and flying SE. Most were fairly high, maybe 150 – 300 feet, and in loose flocks of about 5 to 15. Binoculars are a must.
On August 24, Tim Dyson observed an amazing 162 nighthawks between 5:10pm and 8:40pm. 73 of the birds passed over in the space of just 90 seconds! All were seen from his home on 1st Line of Douro-Dummer. The migration will continue until early September.   Drew Monkman

Common Nighthawk – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another successful nesting of Trumpeter Swans

For the second year in a row, a pair of Trumpeter Swans has nested in the Woodland Campsite wetlands in Lakehurst, ON. This year they successfully reared one cygnet. The one adult is tagged J07. The second adult has no visible tag. Shortly they should be bringing the cygnet nearer populated shorelines. Barb Evett

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Egret (Ardea alba) (1)
– Reported Aug 21, 2018 10:35 by Kyle O’Grady
– Peterborough–Television Road pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47987089
– Comments: “Continuing bird”

Great Egrets south of Riverview Zoo several years ago (Michele Hemery)

 

Pandora Sphinx moth caterpillar
I found this Pandora Sphinx moth caterpillar on the woody part of a grape vine on August 20 in Bridgenorth.  Jennie Gulliver

Pandora Sphinx moth caterpillar on grape vine – August 2018 – Jennie Gulliver

Pandora Sphinx moth – Peterborough – July 2012 – Susan Sackrider

Common Nighthawk migration under way
Last evening (Aug. 18) at 6:15 pm, 5 or 6 of us observed about 15 Common Nighthawks swirling around over our farm near Keene. I have seen the odd one here over the years but this sighting was unprecedented . The skies were clear and there was very little wind , thus making it ideal for hawking. Michael Gillespie, David Fife Line, Keene

Common Nighthawk – Wikimedia

Great Egret – Carl Welbourn – Television Road – August 28, 2016

Great Egret (Ardea alba) (1)
– Reported Aug 17, 2018 16:25 by Ben Taylor
– Laurie Avenue, Ptbo, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47906925
– Comments: “Large white egret. Previously reported.”

Great Egret (Ardea alba) (1)
– Reported Aug 17, 2018 18:05 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Television Road pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47908850
– Comments: “continuing large white heron in pond”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Aug 17, 2018 08:15 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47898454
– Comments: “Large bird on top of Charlotte Towers antenna”

A rarely seen Walking Stick

We are camping (August 17) at Woodland Campsite in Buckhorn. This handsome fellow was on our trailer door this morning. I haven’t seen one of these in years…. Probably because they blend in so well. Cathy Mitchell

Walking Stick – Woodland Campsite Buckhorn – August 2018 – Cathy Mitchell

Great summer for Monarchs
In my opinion, this is the best year for Monarchs in the last half dozen.
Michael Gillespie, David Fife Line, Keene

Monarch on Buddleia (butterfly bush) at Millennium Park – photo by Ben Wolf

 

 

 

 

 

Sightings from the Indian River near Warsaw
Sightings have been fairly quiet this summer but August is proving much more interesting.  And an update on the House Wren’s nest in the hanging basket.  The couple raised two offspring and the nest was empty by July 23.  One egg was punctured and did not hatch.  The eggs are so tiny.
August 5/6:
An Osprey has found a handy perch on a dead branch across the river and when we first saw it back on June 30 it was being harassed by a couple of Red-Winged Blackbirds, though the Osprey held its ground and is still using the perch occasionally.

August 8:  We discovered a large amount of fresh Otter scat and flattened grass abutting the open underside of our river deck.  Fresh stuff, and the odour was very strong!  We put out the Trail Camera, but so far nothing captured on film.  The scat is now dried out and is full of shell.

We also saw a female Scarlet Tanager spotted eating a Common Whitetail Dragonfly in a spruce close to the house. A Caspian Tern, gull-size with a bright orange/red beak, flew back and forth three times along our stretch of the Indian River, plunging four times into the water with no success, then continued flying down river.  Fascinating to watch!

August 9:  A female Belted Kingfisher dived into the river and emerged with what looked like a small bright orange disc-shaped something which it banged hard several times against a fallen dead tree branch, then returned to its higher perch to continue surveying the river.  I have no idea what the “disc” was.

August 13/14:  Our first migrating Yellow-rumped Warbler looking for insects in a large White Pine.
Stephenie Armstrong

Osprey – Indian River – August 2018 – Stephenie Armstrong

Otter scat – Indian River – August 2018 – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juvenile Rose-breasted Grosbeak at north end feeder in Peterborough

I had a juvenile male Rose-breasted Grosbeak on my feeder today. First time I’ve seen a young grosbeak, so I didn’t recognize it as this species. Quite different from the adult male or adult female.  Margo Hughes, Peterborough 

Immature male Rose-breasted Grosbeak – August 14, 2018 – Ptbo – Margo Hughes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coyotes and possible Red Fox kits on Kawartha Golf and Country Club property

Had a great sighting today, as well as an audio. Both of these events happened on the Kawartha Golf and Country Club property. I’m not a golfer but often walk their driveway as part of my morning walk.
     The first was a sighting last Tuesday, August 7. As I started up the driveway from Clonsilla, I glanced up the fairway to my left and noticed two kittens playing about 150 yards away. As I stood there another joined them, then another and another and so on. This continued as more came. Some returned then disappeared again making it difficult to count, but I would guess 12 to 15 were there at a time. I mentioned this to a groundskeeper and was told because of the Coyotes there were no cats on the grounds, so he thought they were probably young Coyotes. The problem, however, is that all were light tan or beige in colour so I think they were Red Fox kits.
    The audio happened today, August 15, and sent chills up my spine. While walking up the driveway, I heard a sound of probably a police car using its siren in a short beeping sort of way. No sooner had it stopped when a large pack of Coyotes began to howl. It was quite unnerving. These Coyotes were behind me near the entrance. When it ceased another pack in front of me began howling. It also seemed to be large and now I was in the between the two with a hiking pole as my protection.
    While on the driveway I have seen many singular Coyotes watching me watching them but never a pack and today, there two packs. A good way to begin the day don’t you think!  Don Finigan

Coyotes in field on Stewart Line (Randy Therrien)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus) (1)
– Reported Aug 09, 2018 09:32 by Peterborough County Birds Database
– Otonabee Gravel Pit Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo

Semipalmated Plover – Wikimedia

Olive-sided Flycatcher – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) (1)
– Reported Aug 09, 2018 13:23 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Warsaw Caves Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) (1)
– Reported Aug 03, 2018 17:30 by Martin Parker
– Stony Lake–Mount Julian-Viamede Resort, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “small tern. much smaller than Caspian Terns”

Common Tern – Wikimedia

Bay-breasted Warbler – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bay-breasted Warbler (Setophaga castanea) (1)
– Reported Aug 09, 2018 08:13 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Looked to be a non breeding adult male. Seen well through binos from 20 ft. Greenish yellowish face with faint eyestripe and arcs around eye, heavily streaked green back, smooth buff/greenish underparts with visible chestnut flanks. Two bold white wing bars and white edged tertials. Based on migrant warblers I have seen locally in the last week…I would say all warblers are fair game now.”

May 222018
 

Orange-crowned Warbler (Oreothlypis celata) (1)
– Reported May 23, 2018 07:23 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “singing”

Orange-crowned Warbler by Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upland Sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) (1)
– Reported May 21, 2018 09:11 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Centre Line Rd Smith, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Heard calling. Known location”

Greg Piasetzki – Upland Sandpiper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (2)
– Reported May 22, 2018 10:15 by Bill Crins
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Cliff Swallow building nest – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) (2)
– Reported May 21, 2018 15:43 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Sand Road–between Asphodel Line 7 and 4, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Vesper Sparrow – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) (1)
– Reported May 21, 2018 15:43 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Sand Road–between Asphodel Line 7 and 4, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3472688,-78.025353&ll=44.3472688,-78.025353
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45902970
– Comments: “adult male singing from roadside Bur Oak at gravel pit”

Orchard Oriole – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Wigeon (Mareca americana) (2)
– Reported May 21, 2018 11:55 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “males”

Greater Scaup (Aythya marila) (1)
– Reported May 21, 2018 11:55 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45912749
– Media: 1 Photo

Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) (6)
– Reported May 21, 2018 11:55 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45912749
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “head with slight bump at rear, small bill.Coarser markings on mantle.”

Whimbrels:  I was out kayaking this morning, May 21, and got a very good look at four Whimbrels standing on a log on the edge of Lakefield Marsh. Annamarie Beckel, Lakefield

Whimbrel – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More shorebirds:  At 11 am, Monday morning (May  21) there were 2 female Wilson’s Phalaropes in remnants of pond on south side of 2nd Line about 500 metres east of  Highway #28. This is the pond which held several rare geese in April and early May. Also there were 2 Lesser Yellowlegs, 3 Semipalmated Plovers, 2 Dunlin, Killdeer, and many Least Sandpipers. No sign of male Wilson’s Phalarope on Choate Road, Port Hope, but 4 Black-bellied Plovers flew in. Sanderling and Dunlin on breakwall rocks close to harbour in Port Hope.   Dave Milsom

Rose-breasted Grosbeak:  This morning, May 21, I had a visit at my feeder from a male and female Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  Derry Fairweather, Buckhorn Lake

Rose-breasted Grosbeak – May 21, 2018, Derry Fairweather

 

Jan 192018
 

We have been getting a pair of Red-bellied Woodpeckers for the last 2 years. We also had a sighting of a Red-headed Woodpecker this past September (2017). I feed all year so we get a lot of different birds here. I also sighted a pair of Sandhill Cranes in September. We are just north of Millbrook on Fallis Line. Ab Parsons

Red-headed Woodpecker – May 28, 2017 – Buckhorn Lake -Nima Taghaboni

Virginia Opossum in Ennismore – 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virginia Opossums: We have 3 opossums living in our garage/hut –  a father, mother and baby. The male is a big white one; the female is grey and the baby is grey. The baby is about half the size of the mother. We live near Rice Lake on Wood Duck Drive on the north shore of Rice Lake. They are wandering around probably in the wooded area behind us which is owned by Southview Cottages. Sandy Kirkland

Virginia Opossum – Rice Lake – Jan. 2018 – Sandy Kirkwood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 10:30 by Ryan Hill
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “just off main road, a bit north of the gate”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

 

 

Red_Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (3)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 10:30 by Ryan Hill
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 14:48 by Toby Rowland
– Lakefield- Lakefield Marshland, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41807307
– Comments: “Continuing female WWSC from the report yesterday. Amongst mixed male and female COGO – will add photos ”

White-winged Scoter on Otonabee River – Tom Northey – Feb. 2, 2014

Male Red-breasted Merganser (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
– Reported Jan 09, 2018 15:33 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41804772
– Comments: “long bill, green head, shaggy back of head, brown breast band; swimming in open water opposite Beavermead Park”

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 15:30 by Ben Taylor
– feeder on County Rod 6, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “continuing bird at house at 3372 County Road Six. Actively feeding at feeder”

Sparrow-like female Rose-breasted Grosbeak – Cindy Bartoli

Male White-winged Crossbill – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White-winged Crossbill (Loxia leucoptera) (4)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 09:30 by Chris Risley
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Heard and then saw flying over trees. Distinctive chips checked with recording online. Familiar with these chips”

On January 9, we had 15 American Robins at our house in Campbellford.  Donald Munro

American Robins feeding on Wild Grape – Beavermead Park – Feb. 7, 2016 – Helen & Larry Keller –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While having morning coffee, this Cooper’s Hawk swept down to the deck and caught a Mourning Dove having a drink at the heated bird bath. Took over an hour for her to finish her meal and leave.  Sue Paradisis 

Cooper’s Hawk eating Mourning Dove – January 2018 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-winged Blackbird, male, spotted in the morning on January 12th, at my feeder on George Street in Lakefield. Don’t usually see these until March! John Dandrea

Red-winged Blackbirds – Dec. 23, 2017 – Fife Line _ Michael Gillespie

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker – Campbellford – January 2017 – Donald Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker: (Observed Jan. 7, 2018) We live at the corner of Centre Road and County Rd 32, aka River Road. This is the first Red-bellied for us. Luba Klama

Jul 242017
 

On Saturday, July 22, I saw a Great Crested Flycatcher, a bird we have never seen before. The sighting was brief, with no time for a photo, but the tricoloured front view of light grey, soft lemon yellow and orange was unmistakable.

Another first this year is a family of Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks. The female has been feeding her two young at the sunflower feeder.  There are also at least three males coming to the feeder. In previous years, these birds have just stayed around for a few days.

Stephenie Armstrong, Sawmill Road, Warsaw

Great Crested Flycatcher – Dick Daniels

Grosbeak family at feeder – July 22, 2017 – Warsaw – Stephenie Armstrong

 

May 052017
 

Today, May 5, I had a Rose-breasted Grosbeak on my feeder. An American bittern has been in the wetland near our house since at least since April 26. Also, I saw my first Yellow Warbler on May 3. I have my hummingbird feeders out, but nothing yet.

Yellow Warbler (Karl Egressy)

Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak – May 5, 2016 – Trudy Gibson –

American Bittern – Don Pettypiece

 

Dec 042016
 

On November 20, we had 8 Pine Grosbeaks at our feeder. They only stayed for an hour or so, however, and we haven’t seen them since. During this past summer, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, along with their young, came to the feeder regularly. Two families nested in the woodlot behind our house.

Also, about 20 years ago, I witnessed an amazing interaction between a Gray Squirrel and a Hairy Woodpecker. The squirrel had scared the woodpecker off the ground feeder – a piece of plywood – on which I’d scattered sunflower seeds. Seconds later, however, the woodpecker returned, and actually landed on the squirrel’s back!  It then proceeded to hammer away on the poor animal’s head. I guess it got in a few good blows before the squirrel took off, because there was blood on the feeder!

Neil Boughen, Warsaw

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks - Drew Monkman

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks – Drew Monkman

Pine Grosbeak - Wikimedia

Pine Grosbeak – Wikimedia

Hairy Woodpecker - Karl Egressy

Hairy Woodpecker – Karl Egressy

 

May 062016
 

I was happy to see two Rose-breasted Grosbeaks in my backyard in Peterborough this morning…May 5, 2016 ~ 0800 a.m.

Trudy Gibson

Note: I had a male grosbeak on May 5, too, at about 6 PM. They love black oil sunflower seed. D.M.

Sparrow-like female Rose-breasted Grosbeak - Cindy Bartoli

Sparrow-like female Rose-breasted Grosbeak – Cindy Bartoli

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at my feeder - May 16, 2007 - Drew Monkman

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at my feeder – May 16, 2007 – Drew Monkman

Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak - May 5, 2016 - Trudy Gibson -

Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak – May 5, 2016 – Trudy Gibson –

 

Oct 022015
 

Philadelphia Vireo
– Reported Sep 30, 2015 07:27 by Bill Crins
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Mourning Warbler
– Reported Oct 01, 2015 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “black cap with olive back and yellow underside, foraging in bushes near shoreline in ecology park”

Wilson’s Warbler
– Reported Sep 29, 2015 07:31 by Bill Crins
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “fully developed black cap”

Rose-breasted Grosbeak
– Reported Sep 30, 2015 07:27 by Bill Crins
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Mourning Warbler - Wikimedia

Mourning Warbler – Wikimedia

 

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks - Drew Monkman

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks – Drew Monkman

Jul 022015
 

I have been having quite a bit of “unusual for my yard” activity lately. For some unknown reason woodpeckers have taken notice of my peanut feeder so I have kept it up. I rarely see any. This year I have numerous Downy Woodpeckers including a male feeding peanuts to a female. More unusual is seeing Hairy Woodpeckers on a daily basis. I have seen both male and female and for the last 2 days the female is feeding a very loud youngster. The female is not looking so great. She is missing a lot of feathers around her neck.
I have also had a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak for several days and yesterday 2 males showed up. That is not unusual during migration but the end of June is surprising.
Finally, I often get Baltimore Orioles in spring but unfortunately they are just passing through. This year they have stayed and come to the hummingbird feeder throughout the day. Two females were fighting over the feeder yesterday and there is also a male.
Makes for good birding even on the cold and wet days.
Sue Paradisis, Tudor Crescent, Peterborough

Female Baltimore Oriole on hummingbird feeder with BBQ skewers - care of Jim Watt

Female Baltimore Oriole on hummingbird feeder with BBQ skewers – care of Jim Watt

Downy Woodpecker (Karl Egressy)

Downy Woodpecker (Karl Egressy)

May 102015
 

A female Rose-breasted Grosbeak and a male Indigo Bunting visited my feeder on Thursday, May 7th. I was able to take some photos.  Nice to see new species! The same day, I also had Northern Cardinals, American Goldfinches, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, White-crowned Sparrows and Chipping Sparrows coming.

Cindy Bartoli, Peterborough

female RBGR - Cindy Bartoli

female RBGR – Cindy Bartoli

male INBU - Cindy Bartoli

male INBU – Cindy Bartoli

male Indigo Bunting - Greg Piasetzki

male Indigo Bunting – Greg Piasetzki

May 102015
 

In early April, we had at least 17 Blue Jays at our feeder and in our yard at the same time. I think they were probably a north-bound flock, since we usually never have more than six. On May 4, we had two Rose-breasted Grosbeaks (males) and today, May 10, we had a female. We’ve noticed over the years that the males always arrive back first, at least a week earlier than the females.  Two pairs of grosbeaks have been nesting in the woodlot behind our place for the past dozen years or more. They come to the feeder all summer long.

Neil Boughen, Warsaw

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at feeder - Drew Monkman - May 2007

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at feeder – Drew Monkman – May 2007

Blue Jays - Gord Belyea

Blue Jays – Gord Belyea