Nov 282018
 
  • Again this year, there are many Snowy Owls in the Lindsay area, especially between Oakwood and Little Britain. On several occasions, as many as three have been seen in the same field. Carl Welbourn, Kawartha Camera Club

    Snowy Owl – Nov. 29, 2018 – Lindsay area – Carl Welbourn

    Snowy Owl 2 – Nov. 29, 2018 – Carl Welbourn

     

  • Today, November 29, I had an American Kestrel turn up at my house in Campbellford and was able to get a picture of it eating a vole.  Donald Munro

  • On Friday, November 23 about 8:30 am a small flock of Evening Grosbeaks, maybe 6-8, were flitting about one of the our feeders. It’s been at least 8 years since I’ve seen these magnificent birds. After a few minutes, the group flew next door so I wasn’t able to get a really good view, but two returned and remained a while so I was rewarded, glued to my binoculars. I do hope they stay around. Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

    Male Evening Grosbeak – Wikimedia

    Female Evening Grosbeak – photo by Jeff Keller

 

  • I had a female Red-bellied Woodpecker and two female Pine Grosbeaks in my yard today. She was eating crab apples. Donald Munro, Campbellford

Female Red-belllied Woodpecker eating crabapple – November 2018 – Donald Munro

 

  • Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) (3)
    – Reported Nov 22, 2018 08:00 by Iain Rayner
    – Trent Rowing club, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50125087
    – Comments: “3 frosty coloured 1st winter birds seen at same time on dump pile. Frosty, pale primaries, same size as HERG, round heads and all dark bills.”

 

  • Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 22, 2018 11:45 by Dave Milsom
    – Peterborough–Trent University Canal Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50128298
    – Media: 1 Photo
    – Comments: “continuing 1st-year bird”

 

  • Jake Lake (Apsley, Peterborough County) Common Loon Survey 2018       (click on image to read)

Jack Lake 2018 Common Loon Survey (from Steven Kerr, Jack Lake Association)

  • Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 19, 2018 12:20 by Robert Walker Ormston
    – Peterborough–Rotary Park & Walkway, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3128468,-78.313466&ll=44.3128468,-78.313466
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50054347
    – Comments: “Most of the birds seen on list seen harassing this owl. Sitting close to the top of a white pine in a stand of white pine. A number of birds were around a fairly small area of the stand making agitated calls. Went to investigate and found owl after about 5 minutes.small pale and light brown owl lacking “ears” about 8to 10 meters up tree”

    Saw-whet Owl banding – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 18, 2018 14:33 by Donald A. Sutherland
    – Peterborough Regional Health Centre, Peterborough CA-ON (44.3001,-78.3470), Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50047143
    – Comments: “perched atop tower on roof of PRHC”

 

  • Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) (1)
    – Reported Nov 18, 2018 10:25 by Iain Rayner
    – Trent Rowing club, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50023765
    – Comments: “Continuing 1st year”

    Iceland Gull (Crossley Guide) First winter bird is lower left. Some are browner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 18, 2018 15:35 by Luke Berg
    – Otonabee River–Nassau Mills Dam to Lock 22, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50031280
    – Comments: “Continuing bird flying up river at the rowing club. Seen earlier around 11:30 as well. ”

    Glaucous Gull (adult) – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • We’ve seen a male Red-bellied Woodpecker eating suet from our feeder twice in the last two weeks. We live 2 km south of Trent University. Gorgeous bird! Doug Sadler’s book “Our Heritage of Birds – Peterborough County in the Kawarthas” – copyright 1983, lists this bird as a rare occasional visitor, this being the northern edge of its range. I’m wondering how frequently they are being seen here now. Is their range moving north because of climate change? Liz Sine                           N.B. Red-bellied Woodpeckers have actually become rather common in recent years. They are being seen all over the County, even on the Shield and right in Peterborough. I believe we saw six on last year’s Christmas Bird Count. Climate change most likely plays a role in the expansion northward of this southern species.

    Red-bellied Woodpecker – Lynde Creek, Whitby- Photo by Brian Crangle

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Update on Pat Edward’s Baltimore Oriole (see Nov. 7 below) The last we saw of the oriole was Tues., Nov. 13th. We headed up north very early in the morning on the bitter cold day – Wed. the 14th so we didn’t put out his feeder as it would have froze. We hung the feeder out again the following day (Nov. 15th) when we were back but we never saw him. It was very cold then as well. We did take a couple of pictures as he would show up early in the morning and if my husband didn’t have his feeder out, he would go to the sunflower one about 4′ away which we found very unusual. As soon as Kevin put out the oriole feeder, he would be there right away!! He must have gone to the feeder the last week I would say at least 50X a day.  It was such a treat to see him – he gave us lots of enjoyment and we just hope he survived that bitter weather. Pat Edwards, Ennismore

    Baltimore Oriole – Nov. 12, 2018 – Ennismore – Pat Edwards

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) (1)
    – Reported Nov 17, 2018 11:05 by Erica Nol
    – Douro 5th Line, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49995989
    – Comments: “continuing bird; in trees 50 m north of dead end on Douro 5th Line; white wing patches in flight”

    Northern Mockingbird – Gord Mallory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Today, November 17, I had 24+ Evening Grosbeaks at feeder 733 Ford Crescent in Cavan. Long time since I saw them last. Great sight. Ken Rumble

male Evening Grosbeak (Gord Belyea)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • I thought you might be interested (I’m watching the birds more closely today, November 16, as they are looking for food as the snow falls heavily) that I just saw a White-crowned Sparrow trying to eat at the sunflower feeder, but he couldn’t get a perch. Must be a migrant trying to get to better weather! Jane Bremner, Douro-Dummer

White-crowned Sparrow – Mike Barker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 16, 2018 08:30 by Mike V.A. Burrell
    – Peterborough–Robinson Place, Peterborough, Ontario
    – Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3032345,-78.31786&ll=44.3032345,-78.31786
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49968782
    – Comments: “adult sitting on very top of south tower.”

    Peregrine Falcon (Wikimedia photo)

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) (1)
    – Reported Nov 14, 2018 09:50 by Ben Taylor
    – Trent Rowing Club, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49933377
    – Comments: “Continuing bird with tan streaking and small. all-dark bill. Slightly smaller than the GLGU.
  • Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) (1)
    – Reported Nov 14, 2018 09:50 by Ben Taylor
    – Trent Rowing Club, Peterborough, Ontario
    Map:
    – Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49933377
    – Comments: “Continuing bird. Juvenile with long bi-coloured bill.”
  • On November 15, I had both a male and female Pine Grosbeak in my crab apple tree. A Pileated Woodpecker has also been coming to the tree. Donald Munroe, Campbellford

    Male Pine Grosbeak eating crab apples – Don Munroe – November 15, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • I can’t believe how busy my yard has been the last couple of weeks. Today, November 14, I had 15 species, including a female Pine Grosbeak eating crab apples, a Northern Flicker, my first American Tree Sparrow of the year, a Purple Finch and a late White-throated Sparrow. This is better than summer! In the last two weeks I have had 20 species, including 12+ Common Redpolls on November 9. That same day, I also had 3 Pine Grosbeaks feeding in my crab apple.  I could clearly see the dirty yellow, orange/brown head and rump and the wing bars. The one bird’s rump had a bit of red. I think it was an immature male and the others were females. Sue Paradisis, Peterborough

American Tree Sparrow (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • On November 8, I had 3 Evening Grosbeaks eating seeds with the chickadees. I bought very inexpensive feeders from the dollar store. They are green plastic trays hung by chains. The birds can fly in or perch on sides – even the woodpeckers.

 

  • This past spring and summer I had 3 pairs of Baltimore Orioles. I put grape jelly in an oriole feeder and my hummingbird feeders, the glass style with yellow ant block. I removed the yellow plastic and using sugar and water the orioles came to feed over and over again. When you remove yellow plastic ant block, all the birds join in with hummingbirds, woodpeckers and chickadees. As well my robin arrived this spring for the third year now. He comes to the deck rail and looks in the patio door for raisins. He just loves them! Esther Ross, Islandview Drive Bailieboro

 

  • I had removed all my oriole/hummingbird feeders in September after which I had not seen either of those birds around. The last week in October, we saw a male Baltimore oriole flying by.  I spotted it one day on our lilac tree so I made up some feed for him and put up the feeder where it always has been.  Within an hour, it had been discovered!  We bring the feeder in at dusk so the raccoons don’t get it as they have in the past. As of November 7, it has been here 10 days at the feeder, probably well over 30x a day.  We love seeing it and I’ve enclosed a couple of pictures. It has crossed my mind however, whether I should be feeding it, as it should have left to go south for warmer temperatures and I would hate the thought of it dying.  Pat Edwards, Ennismore  N.B. I think it’s fine to feed the bird, especially given the cold conditions. It may leave on its own or possibly try to stay all winter. This has happened in the past! Pat Edwards, Ennismore 

Baltimore Oriole – Ennismore – November 7, 2018 – Pat-Edwards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • On November 7, three Trumpeter Swans flew over my house at 10:30 am west of causeway on #7 highway, Omemee. Gavin Hunter

    A pair of Trumpeter Swans on the Pigeon River – February 25, 2017 – Karen Cooper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • On November 4, I had 8 Evening Grosbeaks show up in my yard. They didn’t stay long as the platform feeders had been cleaned out by the earlier birds.
    Sue Paradisis, Peterborough

 

  • Jack Lake 2018 Turtle Observations (Steve Kerr)

Thirty-three individuals reported turtle sightings from the Jack Lake area in 2018.  Ninety-one turtles, comprised of four different species.

Blanding’s Turtle – 7
Midland Painted Turtle – 43
Northern Map Turtle – 6
Snapping Turtle – 34

Blanding’s Turtle – Rick Stankiewicz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jun 202018
 

Purple Finches (since early May)

This year, for the first time, we have Purple Finches coming to our feeder. They arrived in early May. I first noted a male, who showed a cinnamon, chestnut-reddish coloured head and body which morphed into a rose/raspberry by the end of May. The females gradually turned from sparrow-like to a very light rose. I think that there are two males and maybe four in total usually show in pairs or singles. One pair comes from the rail-trail behind 500 McDonnel St. Actually, the whole of the rail trail between Park and Bonnacord is interesting with Black Locust trees, a fairly large isolated wooded creek side area and a large communal garden site.  Art Harron, McDonnel Street

Note: Purple Finches are quite rare in Peterborough in the summer. D.M.

male Purple Finch – Wikimedia

House Finch (for comparison) – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Predation of robin nest (June 15)

We live on Firwood in Peterborough and had an American Robin nest in a low evergreen in front of our living room window. We were watching as the eggs were laid, hatched and the babies were fed. We watched with pride and pleasure as the parents fed their chicks and feathers had developed, and from a distance I took photos of the progress of the family. This morning, we were shocked, disappointed and devastated to see the nest empty and one baby (body about 3 inches long – perhaps dropped) on the cement walkway of our neighbour (about 15 feet from the nest). It did not seem to have any bite marks or signs of a cat or other animal attacking it but looked as if the fall had killed it. Would this be another bird stealing it from the nest?? What may have happened to the siblings? What may have happened to the parents? Is there somewhere I can find more information? Audrey Moore

Note: Nests of all kinds can be vulnerable to attacks from predators, such as Blue Jays, American Crows, Common Grackles, and many other species of birds and mammals, including cats. In Peterborough, crows seem to be the number one culprit. I have never had a robin nest on my property that has not been predated. Always sad. D.M. 

American Robin fledglings on nest – Murray Lincoln

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Squirrel control (June 11 and 27)

We have a Red Fox that visits our yard, even climbing up onto the deck railing. We have witnessed the fox chasing squirrels all around our deck, over chairs, a table and a bench. The fox has jumped from the ground (approx. 6 feet) to the deck railing. It has often walked off with breakfast in its mouth. We have also seen it chase squirrels along the fence, which is about 8 feet high. I have some of it on video as it chased the squirrel under the deck. All this to the tune of a murder of crows voicing their displeasure – in fact, the fox’s arrival is arrival in our yard is announced by the crows.

Don Finigan, Peterborough

Note: On June 27, Don watched the fox catch a squirrel. Don writes: “I have witnessed 5 pursuits so far, in 2 of these the fox was the winner and took home breakfast. The other 3 involved 2 squirrels and 1 ground squirrel. In these 3, it was a straight race. Speed told the story. The other 2 took place on our deck with 2 levels, 6 planters, 2 tables, 1 bench, 4 chairs, 1 BBQ and 2 interior safety railings. All these obstructions for the squirrels to dodge slowed them down and gave the fox its chance to catch them. So when I come back I don’t want to be a squirrel!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strange colour morphs in Gray Squirrels (June)

I thought these pictures of multicolored brown Eastern Gray Squirrels would be of interest to naturalists. They were taken weeks apart. Peter Ouimet, Bianco Crescent, Peterborough

Brown colour morph E. Gray Squirrel – June 2018 – PTBO – Peter Ouimet

A different brown colour morph E. Gray Squirrel – June 2018 – PTBO – Peter Ouimet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cecropia moth emerges and mates! (May 31) 

I thought you’d like to see this beautiful silk moth that emerged this evening, May 29, after months of being cocooned in our purple sand cherry. We watched it as a caterpillar until one day it just simply disappeared! Then, later in August or September we noticed a clump of leaves stuck together and concluded it might be that it had wrapped itself up for the winter. Sure enough! It was moving its very large wings so perhaps it will be gone by morning. Wendy Marrs

Cecropia- Wendy Marrs

Follow-up: My husband woke me the next day (May 30) with “there are twins!” We soon realized that somehow a male had found our female. They stayed attached all day and last evening were both gone without a trace. After a whole fall, winter and spring, we had grown quite attached to our little guest but that just how it goes in nature:)

Mating Cecropia moths – Wendy Marrs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note from Tim Dyson: 

“Don’t fret Wendy, assuming your Cecropia story is over. After separation of the male and female moths, the female will very often lay a few to several eggs right on the same shrub or tree that she had dined upon the year before as a larva. Look for evidence of the next generation on your sand cherry in the autumn. You might just find another cocoon or two!”

 

Goldfinches playing in the wind? (May 6)

On Friday evening, at the height of a wind storm, but after the rain had lessened somewhat, about a dozen American Goldfinches, mostly male, converged on our birdfeeder stand and faced into the wind, rather than keep to  shelter.  Then, one by one, they jumped face first into the gale-force west wind, and were swept immediately back to the other end of the yard.  They did this repeatedly, as though it was a game.  I have never seen such strong and noisy wind, but the birds seemed to enjoy the challenge – wind-surfing!  Callie Stacey, Lakefield

White American Robin (April 11)

I live in Campbellford and over the past few weeks I have observed a white robin in my backyard, just north of the Canadian Tire parking lot.  It is white with a couple of grey to black patches or strips on its back, and it has a slight orange on the bottom of its breast.  The eyes are black (not pink).  Otherwise it looks like the white robins shown on the internet.  (Google white robin)  It appears to be a mature robin and has always been seen by me alone.  An exception was last night when it was snowing out and it appeared on the lawn, then a rabbit came out and the two picked and ate together as the snow began to cover the lawn.  By eight o’clock they had both disappeared. I have never seen one before. Paul Smith 

Note: This is clearly a leucistic bird, meaning it is lacking in normal pigmentation. D.M.

Leucistic American Robin – Campbellford – via James Burrett – May 2018

 

Purple

 

 

 

Jan 212018
 

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (1)
– Reported Jan 20, 2018 14:00 by Alexandra Israel
– Lang Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42106339
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Alerted by mobbing chickadees. Only general location given.”

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Dave Heuft)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gray Jay (Northern) (Perisoreus canadensis [canadensis Group]) (1)
– Reported Jan 20, 2018 10:14 by Kenneth G.D. Burrell
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42093450
– Comments: “Called a few times, Lill spotted it along Trillium just north of Wolf Pond(?). Pretty unexpected!”

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had 16 Purple Finches on my property on January 19.  Don Munro, Campbellford

Purple Finch (male) – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White-winged Crossbill (Loxia leucoptera) (4)
– Reported Jan 18, 2018 11:00 by Scott McKinlay
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42053565
– Comments: “On the Adam Scott trail. They were singing the varied pitch song from spruce trees next to the trail before flying off.”

White-winged Crossbill (female) – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (2)
– Reported Jan 18, 2018 11:00 by Scott McKinlay
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Good views of a male and female that were responding to pishing by calling continuously and flying back and forth between three white pine trees that surrounded me. There was no white at all for either bird on the solid dark wings. The gip gip gip calls were in groups of 2 to 6. These were located about 1/3 of the way along the PT trail, travelling east to west.”

Red Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) (2)
– Reported Jan 19, 2018 12:30 by Tim Haan
– 158 George Street North, Peterborough, Ontario, CA (44.299, -78.318), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Both male and female near the train bridge”

Pair of Northern Pintail – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (3)
– Reported Jan 16, 2018 08:07 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41958892
– Comments: “Males. Flyover. ”

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Jan 16, 2018 09:44 by Scott Gibson
– 288 Scriven Road, Bailieboro, Ontario, CA (44.146, -78.313), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41959644
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “top of hill in tree beside rd. pics.”

I had a couple of firsts today: first time skiing and first Snowy Owl of the winter. I saw an eBird posting at 11:15 this morning (January 16) and immediately twitched out to see the bird at 11:30 on Scriven Line. I also, watched about 100 Snow buntings for 20 minutes but couldn’t find one Lapland Longspur. Michael Gillespie

Snow Bunting (from Crossley ID Guide)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Jan 15, 2018 09:05 by Chris Risley
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Black head and back with barred sides, hammering on and peeling bark from a red pine. Spotted about 300 meters beyond the park gate.”

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (3)
– Reported Jan 15, 2018 15:17 by Toby Rowland
– Peterborough–Otonabee River (Lock 19), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2879468,-78.3082509&ll=44.2879468,-78.3082509
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41943549
– Comments: “Continuing three slightly worn males just below the lock”

Red-breasted Merganser (male) – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Jan 14, 2018 16:00 by Colin Jones
– Peterborough–Little Lake, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2965341,-78.3105472&ll=44.2965341,-78.3105472
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41908174
– Comments: “Sitting on the water fountain structure in the middle of the lake. Found earlier in the day by Warren Dunlop.”

Ruffed Grouse: I read your recent column on the winter bird counts. What you say about grouse is accurate. I saw one grouse today, whereas normally I would scare up six. The most I have ever seen in one group decades ago was 18 on a rainy day because they don’t like to fly when they are wet. Mel Fee, Cavan

Ruffed Grouse – Parry Sound – via Rob Moos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruffed Grouse: I wanted to comment on the grouse mystery. Growing up on a farm in the 50 & 60s we did hunt locally and there were always an abundance of grouse, hares, jacks and cottontails. Habitat has been reduced in some areas but not in others so what has changed? Coyotes have arrived in great numbers all across southern Ontario. We continually have tracks in our yard. Along with a very healthy Red Fox population I believe that anything nesting on the ground doesn’t have much of a chance. Would be interested to know if other ground nesting birds such as the Killdeer have seen declines. Always enjoy your columns and just to let you know I stopped hunting 50 years ago.  Al Mace, Westview Dr. Omemee

Jan 012018
 

The 32nd Petroglyphs Christmas Bird Count was held on Thursday, December 27, 2017 during very cold conditions. It was nearly -30 degrees C first thing in the morning and only warmed up to about -18 by mid-afternoon.

Participants: 24
Total species: 32 (close to the 10-year average of 33.5)
Total individuals: 1826 (10-year average is 2248)
As a result of the very cold weather there was virtually no open water and therefore no waterbirds.

Notable species and count highs (no new record highs) included:
BALD EAGLE: 7 (slightly higher than average)
GOLDEN EAGLE: 1 sub-adult bird seen soaring over the Kawartha Nordic Ski Trails

BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER: 1 in the Petroglyphs Provincial Park (although previously recorded nearly every year this species has only been detected 3 times in the past 10 years)

GRAY JAY: a single bird was located in a bog along the Sandy Lake Rd (until 2009 recorded annually but since then only recorded in 2014 and during count period in 2016)

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 146 (well above the 10-year average of 87 but nowhere near the count high of 526)

AMERICAN ROBIN: 2 (absent in most years)

CEDAR WAXWING: 6  (absent in most years)

AMERICAN TREE SPARROW: 122 (well above the 10-year average of 18; count high is 218)
DARK-EYED JUNCO: 134 (well above the 10-year average of 12 and near count high of 168)

American Tree Sparrow – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Low Counts:
RUFFED GROUSE: 7 (below 10-year average of 15 and the count high of 77)ROCK PIGEON: only a single flock of 10 (well below the 10-year average of 58 and the count high of 89)
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 40 (well below the 10-year average of 80 and count high of 233)
EUROPEAN STARLING: 10 (below 10-year average of 26 and count high of 114)

Winter Finches:

PURPLE FINCH: 2

RED CROSSBILL: 41

WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL: 8 including singing individuals

PINE SISKIN: 114

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 103

EVENING GROSBEAK: 2

Notable Misses:
SNOW BUNTING: recorded most years (has only been missed 5 times)

Colin Jones, Count Compiler

Male White-winged Crossbill – Wikimedia

Purple Finch (male) – Karl Egressy

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

Apr 082016
 

We returned to our home on Dodworth Island on Stony Lake on Monday and immediately filled the four feeders. The activity is the most ever….We have 10 usual species but two things stand out. There are no Common Redpolls, but we have over 50 Pine Siskins. At least one Osprey is back..no loons here yet. The ice went out on April 1.  Rob Welsh

NOTE:  Pine Siskins are showing up in large numbers all over Peterborough and the Kawarthas right now. Flocks of 60+ have come to our feeder in recent days, along with close to a dozen Purple Finches. Drew Monkman

I was about to send out an APB. However, this evening around 5 pm. our pair of Common Loons finally arrived (Buckhorn Lake near Six Foot Bay) . Unfortunately, our “lone loon”, who usually arrives before them (as early as April 1) hasn’t appeared yet. Fingers crossed he’s ok.  Toni Sinclair, Buckhorn Lake

On April 6, I had 12-15 Purple Finches at our feeder for most of the day. No, they were not House Finches! Mostly females but at least 4 showy males.   Jim Cashmore, Wallis Drive, Peterborough

I heard the first Spring Peeper chorus for me this year, on March 31 @ 9th Line and County Road 32 (east bank along Otonabee towards Lakefield). Susan Chow

I saw my first Mourning Cloak butterfly on March 27,  just south of Keene.  Michael Gillespie

On the Indian River outside Warsaw, we heard an Eastern Phoebe calling March 28 at about 8:30 am – our harbinger of Spring!  Jane Bremner, Warsaw

Jerry Ball and I covered some of the side roads off Hwy 507 in the northern part of Trent Lakes Municipality and found Compton Tortoiseshell butterflies on three different roads. Martin Parker

We’ve had a weasel around all winter (a Long-tailed, we think), but never managed to get a photo until Easter Sunday, March 23… its white winter coat has started changing. Gwen Forsyth, Lakefield

I saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes on March 23. They were flying northeast over Centre Line of Smith at the 7th Line.  Jim Watt, Peterborough

I was outside March 23 cleaning the snow off the deck and about 20 feet above my head flew this magnificent adult Bald Eagle. He went upwards and landed on top of the pine tree on our point. Waited there for about ten minutes.  Derry Fairweather, Upper Buckhorn Lake

Today, March 22, my wife saw a pair of Gray Squirrels mating in our yard. It seems far too late, since Gray Squirrels give birth to their first litter this month. I haven’t been able to find a reference to mating in March anywhere online. Drew Monkman

Bald Eagle - March 23, 2016 Derry Fairweather

Bald Eagle – March 23, 2016 Derry Fairweather

Compton Tortoiseshell - Wikimedia

Compton Tortoiseshell – Wikimedia

Long-tailed Weasel - March 23 - Gwen Forsyth

Long-tailed Weasel – March 23 – Gwen Forsyth

Mourning Cloak - Maple Cr. - Apr. 2014 - Drew Monkman

Mourning Cloak – Maple Cr. – Apr. 2014 – Drew Monkman

 

Pine Siskin (by Karl Egressy)

Pine Siskin (by Karl Egressy)

Eastern Phoebe at nest - David Frank

Eastern Phoebe at nest – David Frank