Jan 282018
 

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) (1)
– Reported Feb 02, 2018 15:30 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Hannah Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 7 Photos
– Comments: “Cracking views of Adult flying over road near Hwy 28. Watched for 5 minutes as it was kiting to the S and then slowly glided to the N not too far above trees. Golden nape visible, long tail-short head. No white at base of tail or at base of primaries. For the first few seconds I thought it was a dark RLHA as it was kiting, the golden head looked pale in the light, the dark carpal marks contrasted with paler flight feathers, and the tail looked like it had a broad terminal band…but then it turned showing size and broad eagle shaped wings(although not as barn board like as BAEA). It proceeded to put on a fantastic show for 5 minutes and came close enough for decent pictures.”

Adult Golden Eagle photographed at Petroglyph Provincial Park (Tim Dyson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Feb 01, 2018 09:11 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–King St just W George St, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42415089
– Comments: “adult, unsuccessfully chasing around a dozen pigeons low over King Street Parking Garage and 150 and 151 King St; flew W landing on communications towers atop Charlotte Towers (245 Charlotte St.).”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Feb 01, 2018 08:03 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42407446
– Comments: “Sitting on antenna atop Charlotte Towers”

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – PRHC – Jan. 13, 2015 – Loree Stephens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Jan 28, 2018 16:45 by Dave Milsom
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “seen flying out of giant white pine near auto wreckers yard.”

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (2) CONFIRMED
– Reported Jan 28, 2018 15:39 by Kim Zippel
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “We listened to 4-5 sessions of calls at dusk each lasting 1-3 minutes, separated by about 3-5 minutes. During one session a second owl joined in so there were definately two. A saw-whet was reported very close to this site within the past few days.”

NSWO – Warsaw – Tim Dyson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My wife, 3 kids, 3 dogs and I just moved to Buckhorn from Toronto at Christmas. We live in the bush on a slab of Canadian  Shield nestled in a gorgeous forest. My dogs discovered on January 10 of this year that we share the forest with numerous animals including (unfortunately for my curious pointers, who discovered her the hard way) this big Porcupine out of her den taking in some milder weather.   Justin Michaelov, Buckhorn

Porcupine – Buckhorn – Jan. 10, 2018 – Justin Michaelov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, Jan. 28, I captured a picture of these two Trumpeter Swans on my lake today. The milder weather seems to be bringing out more waterfowl.  Laurie McLaughlin-Maveal, Lake Katchewanooka

Trumpeter Swans – Jan. 28, 2018 – Lake Katchewanooka – Laurie McLaughlin-Maveal

Jul 172017
 

I had a great day in the field on July 7. I was in the Lily Lake area and found a Green Heron NEST with three fuzzy herons, as well as eggshells. Later, I found what I think is a Porcupine den.

I also collected a few sedges and a rush from various locations in the Kawarthas. The species have yet to be identified.

Erin McGauley

Green Heron nest – Lily Lake area – June 2017 – Erin McGauley

Green Heron (Don McLeod)

Porcupine den in tree – Lily Lake – Erin McGauley

 

 

Unidentified sedge – July 7, 2017 – Erin McGauley

Unidentified sedge – July 7, 2017 – Erin McGauley

Unidentified sedge- July 7, 2017 – Erin McGauley

Unidentified sedge – July 7, 2017 – Erin McGauley

Unidentified rush – July 7, 2017 – Erin McGauley

Dec 162016
 

Despite the drought of 2016, the apple crop sure seemed to be bumper. Everyone I know who has them growing in their yards seems to  agree. I wouldn’t know, but perhaps apple trees like a good dry spell every now and then. There are a dozen apple trees in the yard of my friend, Angela, near Warsaw. Her trees, too, were full of apples this year, like never before. In addition to attracting many insects as the fallen apples began to rot on the ground, and then deer mice and flying squirrels at night who were dining heavily on various moths and other insects – not to mention the frequent visits paid by deer in the low-light hours later in the season – two other animals appeared and feasted upon the fallen apples, too.

At night, a Porcupine (and sometimes two) have munched on the ground in spots where the heaviest fall of apples has covered the ground near a split-rail cedar fence.  The visits by this creature where usually taking place in August, September, and October. Well then in daylight, starting in November, a Beaver (who had recently moved into my friend’s pond), has been coming up into the yard, and very near where his prickly friend had come at night. This creature has been enjoying the bounty of apples that had hung on to the branches until they fell much later in the season, after heavier frosts.

I suppose if you are an animal that typically eats very bitter things like the poplar twigs that Beavers seem to like, and the bark of conifers enjoyed by Porcupines, then every now and then these animals must satisfy a sweet-tooth craving with things like apples. Biologically speaking, it is likely quite a common occurrence and of a nutritional benefit, these two animals dining on fruit this much. And, as I understand, they had become quite addicted to the apples at my friend’s little orchard, as visits were very frequent while the apple supply lasted. In fact, they were so involved with their fruit fancy, that they both allowed me a close approach on a couple of occasions.

At about noon on December 8th, there was a Hermit Thrush in a cottage yard on South Bay of Stoney Lake. It seemed to be sticking to areas of fallen leaves that were not yet covered in snow, like underneath the edges of a large deck, and among the dead leaves gathered by wind just off the basement walk-out patio around the other side of the cottage. I had never seen one in December before. I hope it finds what it needs to manage this first snow storm of the winter. It would appear that I can leave the gardens be for now, until 2017! You think?  Time for a different shovel, I suppose.

Tim Dyson, Stoney Lake

Porcupine at night with apple - Tim Dyson

Porcupine at night with apple – Tim Dyson

Beaver by day with apple - Tim Dyson

Beaver by day with apple – Tim Dyson

Hermit Thrush - Wikimedia

Hermit Thrush – Wikimedia