Jun 242017
 

We have a sweet smelling Abelia shrub that is proving to be very popular with the insect population. Visitors this month include our first and so far only Monarch, a Black Swallowtail, a White Admiral, and two hawkmoths, including the Hummingbird Clearwing and the Nessus Sphinx, the latter new to us. And out amongst the wildflowers, the Canada Tiger Swallowtail is regularly feeding on the Viper’s Bugloss. I was able to photograph them all except the Monarch, with two separate views of the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth.

On June 8th, Peter got a bit of a surprise opening the door to our under-deck to find an Eastern Milksnake coiled around one of the garden hoses. He was lucky to get a photo as it made its way along the line of stopcocks heading for a bit of cover under the stairs.

Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Eastern Milksnake – Peter Armstrong

Nessus Sphinx at Abelia shrub. Note two yellow bands on abdomen – Stephenie Armstrong – June 2017

Hummingbird Clearwing at Abelia shrub – Stephenie Armstrong

 

Canada Tiger Swallowtail on Viper Bugloss – Stephenie Armstrong

Mar 062017
 

I was lucky to come across this Red-headed Woodpecker on May 21, 2016, at my home on Northey’s Bay Road on the north shore of Stoney Lake.  I had never seen one and haven’t seen one since. In August 9, 2016, we also had a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth feeding at the phlox in our garden. I had seen it in the garden in August, 2015, as well, but never before that.

Dennis Johnson, Stoney Lake

Red-headed Woodpecker 2 – May 2016 – Dennis Johnson

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth – August 2016 – Dennis Johnson

 

Jul 292016
 
Cardinal Flower - August 3, 2016 - Big Gull Lake - Elaine Monkman

Cardinal Flower – August 3, 2016 – Big Gull Lake – Elaine Monkman

Here are some sightings of interest from this past week (July 25 – 31, 2016)) at my brother’s cottage on Big Gull Lake, south of Bon Echo Provincial Park.

  1. Family group of Cooper’s Hawks. Two or three very vocal juveniles, “whistling” loudly. As big as adults.
  2. A covey of 8 Ruffed Grouse, almost adult size.
  3. A Hummingbird Clearwing Moth on the petunias at the dock.
  4. A “convocation” of five, non-breeding Common Loons on the lake.
  5. A larval Blue-spotted Salamander, which was still showing gills behind the head. Was in a backwater section of shoreline, protected from waves by a large fallen log.
  6. Several Dragonhunter dragonflies.
  7. Numerous Red-eyed Vireos (probably young ones) on cottage property.
  8. Two Ruby-throated Hummingbirds at nectar feeder.
  9. Cardinal flowers in bloom along shoreline.
  10. Bird song: Hermit Thrush, Red-eyed Vireo, Pine Warbler

Drew Monkman

juvenile Cooper's Hawk - Linda Easton

juvenile Cooper’s Hawk – Linda Easton

Aug 182014
 

I don’t know how rare or common these Hummingbird Clearwing moths are in this area, but I’d never seen or heard of one before. It visited my Monardas at about 5 p.m. on August 12. It was pretty amazing to watch a moth fly and hover like a hummingbird. For a while, I was so confused about what I was seeing that I almost convinced myself it was a fairy!
Kathryn Sheridan, Euclid Avenue, Peterborough

Note: Hummingbird Clearwings show up every summer in small numbers in the Kawarthas.

Hummingbird Clearwing moth - Kathryn Sheridan

Hummingbird Clearwing moth – Kathryn Sheridan