Apr 242018
 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (20)
– Reported Apr 28, 2018 07:39 by Steve Paul
– 341 Hiawatha Line, Keene, Ontario, CA (44.178, -78.204), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 6 Photos
– Comments: “Two separate groups eventually came together. Close to 50/50 male/female split. Observed a possible second small pack way out on Rice Lake, but couldn’t clearly state whether RBM or CM. Will post pictures.”

Female Red-breasted Merganser (Karl Egressy)

Red-breasted Merganser (male) – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sora (Porzana carolina) (1)
– Reported Apr 27, 2018 13:00 by Kathryn Sheridan
– Lakefield Marsh, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “I didn’t see it, but I heard it make its unusual, unmistakale call/song.”

Sora (rail) – Wikimeda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus) (1) CONFIRMED
– Reported Apr 27, 2018 15:55 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–3.8 km SSE on Bensfort Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “First county record. Found earlier in the afternoon by Scott Gibson. Foraging in flooded hayfield on E side Bensfort Rd with Greater Yellowleg and Lesser Yellowleg. Digiscoped from around 100 m.”

Long-billed Dowitcher – USFW service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Towhee:  This morning, April 27, I saw a female Eastern Towhee scratching around in the leaf litter below one of my feeders. I guess they’re not uncommon, but it’s the first I’ve seen here.  Annamarie Beckel

female Eastern Towhee (Tom Bell)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Redhead (Aythya americana) (2)
– Reported Apr 26, 2018 15:45 by Christopher Wagner
– Stony Lake, North Kawartha CA-ON (44.5608,-78.1728), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Male and female in large mixed flock”

Male Redhead – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Northern) (Strix varia [varia Group]) (3)
– Reported Apr 26, 2018 22:46 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Ontario Nocturnal Owl Survey route 218 Chandos Lake stop 9, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “pair in close and a third further away.”

Barred Owl with Winterberry in background – Tim Dyson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-winged Teal (Spatula discors) (2)
– Reported Apr 26, 2018 15:00 by Dave Milsom
– 2nd Line cornfields, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Blue-winged Teal – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horned Grebe (Podiceps auritus) (2)
– Reported Apr 25, 2018 12:00 by John Davey
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Horned Grebe in waves – April 2018 – Don Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) (1)
– Reported Apr 23, 2018 07:33 by Bill Crins
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “alternate plumage; brown upperparts, white underparts strongly spotted with large black spots, pale superciliary, orange beak and legs; flew with stiff, shallow wingbeats; initially on stones adjacent to beach, then flew across toward Little Lake Cemetery”

Spotted Sandpiper with dragonfly nymph in beak – Lower Buckhorn Lake – June 2016 – Robin Blake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Heron (Butorides virescens) (1)
– Reported Apr 23, 2018 08:45 by Sheila Collett
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “FOY. Seen flying across the playing fields and then again flying across the water to the cemetery.”

Green Heron (Don McLeod)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pileated Woodpecker – Woke up this morning (April 22) with a tapping sound and looked outside to see the Pileated Woodpecker. The loons are back as well, but haven’t been able to get a picture.  Derry Fairweather, Upper Buckhorn Lake

Pileated Woodpecker – April 22, 2018 – Derry Fairweather

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (2)
– Reported Apr 21, 2018 16:32 by Matthew Tobey
– Peterborough–Airport Rd Railroad, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “2 owlets in nest at edge of woodlot south of the wetland. Adult not present.”

Great Horned Owls in nest – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cackling Goose (Richardson’s) (Branta hutchinsii hutchinsii) (5)
– Reported Apr 22, 2018 10:46 by Matthew Tobey
– Mather’s Corners Meltwater Pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Segregated from small flock of CANG at east end of meltwater pond.”

Cackling Geese – Little L. – Dec. 2015 – Iain Rayner

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) (2)
– Reported Apr 22, 2018 10:46 by C Douglas
– Mather’s Corners Meltwater Pond, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Pair of Northern Pintail – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) (40)
– Reported Apr 22, 2018 09:40 by Dave Milsom
– Highway 28 at Block Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Flock of 10 in field, 30 flying over.”

Snow Buntings – Wikimedia

Feb 062018
 

I heard a Great Horned owl at the edge of the cedar/ash/white pine forest by the Otonabee River near 9th line. On Feb 10- 5:45 am. Susan Chow

Great Horned Owl – Dec. 23, 2015 – Glen Grills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Feb 09, 2018 18:30 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Rotary Park & Walkway, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42629795
– Comments: “heard vocalizing three times from the direction of Nichol’s Oval at the entrance to the park at Rogers St.”

Barred Owl – Wilco Overink – Nov. 29, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is an abundance of Snowy Owls in our area this year. Most any concession in the Lindsay area will yield a Snowy. Try Post Road (Hwy 7 north to Hwy 36) and Fieldside Road (Cheese Factory Road intersection).  The bird photographed here is the closest to home I have sighted. Feb 9 / 2018 at the Bypass & Bensford Bridge Rd ramp.  Carl Welbourn, Kawartha Camera Club

Snowy Owl – Feb. 9, 2018 – Carl Welbourn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Feb 09, 2018 12:30 by Basil Conlin
– Lady Eaton Drumlin, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42625033
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “sitting about 50m away from flock of feeding robins, perhaps waiting for one to let its guard down?”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Feb 09, 2018 08:32 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–King St just W George St, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42615388
– Comments: “perched on communication towers atop Charlotte Towers (245 Charlotte St)”

I took this picture of a Cooper’s Hawk on February 6 behind our unit. It was on a Rock Pigeon.  Don Finigan

Cooper’s Hawk – Don Finigan – Feb. 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, Feb. 6, at about 2:00 pm, I had a Carolina Wren at my feeder eating suet. The bird feeder is high up – at the back of the
house. I live at 123 Creekwood Drive in Peterborough.

Sherry Hambly

Carolina Wren – Feb. 6 2018 – Creekwood Dr. PTBO – Sherry Hambly

Carolina Wren (Wikimedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Feb 04, 2018 20:00 by Brendan Boyd
– 711 Armour Rd, Peterborough CA-ON (44.3159,-78.3098), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “A yard bird I never expected. Sitting on the hydro line above the driveway.”

Barred Owl Feb. 8, 2015 – Television Road – Brenda Ibey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (2)

– Reported Feb 04, 2018 16:11 by Matthew Tobey
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Calling near park entrance at 1740.”

Northern Saw-Whet Owl – Kelly Simmonds – March 26, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (4)
– Reported Feb 03, 2018 14:38 by Warren Dunlop
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “2 individuals & one group of 2 – all flyovers calling – gip gip gip.”

Red Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

Jan 282018
 

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) (1)
– Reported Feb 02, 2018 15:30 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Hannah Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 7 Photos
– Comments: “Cracking views of Adult flying over road near Hwy 28. Watched for 5 minutes as it was kiting to the S and then slowly glided to the N not too far above trees. Golden nape visible, long tail-short head. No white at base of tail or at base of primaries. For the first few seconds I thought it was a dark RLHA as it was kiting, the golden head looked pale in the light, the dark carpal marks contrasted with paler flight feathers, and the tail looked like it had a broad terminal band…but then it turned showing size and broad eagle shaped wings(although not as barn board like as BAEA). It proceeded to put on a fantastic show for 5 minutes and came close enough for decent pictures.”

Adult Golden Eagle photographed at Petroglyph Provincial Park (Tim Dyson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Feb 01, 2018 09:11 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–King St just W George St, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42415089
– Comments: “adult, unsuccessfully chasing around a dozen pigeons low over King Street Parking Garage and 150 and 151 King St; flew W landing on communications towers atop Charlotte Towers (245 Charlotte St.).”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Feb 01, 2018 08:03 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42407446
– Comments: “Sitting on antenna atop Charlotte Towers”

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – PRHC – Jan. 13, 2015 – Loree Stephens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Jan 28, 2018 16:45 by Dave Milsom
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “seen flying out of giant white pine near auto wreckers yard.”

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (2) CONFIRMED
– Reported Jan 28, 2018 15:39 by Kim Zippel
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “We listened to 4-5 sessions of calls at dusk each lasting 1-3 minutes, separated by about 3-5 minutes. During one session a second owl joined in so there were definately two. A saw-whet was reported very close to this site within the past few days.”

NSWO – Warsaw – Tim Dyson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My wife, 3 kids, 3 dogs and I just moved to Buckhorn from Toronto at Christmas. We live in the bush on a slab of Canadian  Shield nestled in a gorgeous forest. My dogs discovered on January 10 of this year that we share the forest with numerous animals including (unfortunately for my curious pointers, who discovered her the hard way) this big Porcupine out of her den taking in some milder weather.   Justin Michaelov, Buckhorn

Porcupine – Buckhorn – Jan. 10, 2018 – Justin Michaelov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, Jan. 28, I captured a picture of these two Trumpeter Swans on my lake today. The milder weather seems to be bringing out more waterfowl.  Laurie McLaughlin-Maveal, Lake Katchewanooka

Trumpeter Swans – Jan. 28, 2018 – Lake Katchewanooka – Laurie McLaughlin-Maveal

Jan 222018
 

On my way home from a friend’s this evening at dusk (Jan. 27 – 4:45pm) while driving through pouring rain on Co. Rd. 38 between the Dummer-Asphodel Road and Webster Road south of Warsaw, an immature Snowy Owl suddenly appeared flying along beside me at about hydro line height. It then turned and crossed the road ahead of me and came to land briefly on a utility pole, before taking flight gain and heading far out to the west until it finally disappeared from my view. This was my third of the winter and first of 2018. The one photo I snapped off doesn’t show much of anything good enough for posting. Hmm… three Snowies and still no good pictures. Will keep watching and hoping! Tim Dyson, Warsaw

Immature Snowy Owl (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bird chatter when filling feeders

I was filling my bird feeders this morning (Jan. 25), and I noted that once I had started there was a good deal of bird chatter.  Would they be communicating with each other to say “she’s filling the feeder, let’s eat”?  I’ve experienced this a few times now.  The chatter stops, lasting maybe 10 seconds or so.  Once I close my door, I noted that the birds wait, and once they feel I’m gone they go at the feeders. I have the usual birds – chickadees, finches, cardinals, etc.  Sue Ramey

NOTE: Please send me an email if you’ve noticed this phenomenon yourself. D.M. (dmonkman1@cogeco.ca)

Northern Cardinal – by Ruthanne-Sobiera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (3)
– Reported Jan 24, 2018 12:45 by Scott McKinlay
– 120 Fradette Avenue, Peterborough, Ontario, CA (44.287, -78.311), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Continuing birds along this stretch of the Otonabee. 2 males 1 female.”

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (1)
– Reported Jan 24, 2018 16:40 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “giving tremolo call frequently for ten minutes near entrance to park”

Eastern Screech-owl – red phase – 9th Line of Selwyn Twsp – March 11, 2017, Kathy McCue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (2)
– Reported Jan 24, 2018 16:40 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “very vocal pair”

Great Horned Owl at dusk (Luke Berg)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (2)
– Reported Jan 24, 2018 16:40 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “two individuals, one calling very loudly from cedars near Holy Cross, another calling loudly from cedars near trail head. Both birds could be heard hooting back and forth for 35 minutes beginning at 5pm”   LISTEN HERE

Saw-whet Owl banding – Wikimedia

Northern Saw-whet Owl – Kelly Simmonds – March 24, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On January 21, I came across an immature Red-tailed Hawk eating a Gray Squirrel on the side of Golfview Road, beside the Kawartha Golf and Country Club and right behind the Clonsilla Ave. fire station. It sure scared the jogger who happened by! The hawk wouldn’t give up his squirrel and flew off with it into the woods. Mark Scriver

Immature Red-tailed Hawk eating Gray Squirrel – Jan. 21, 2018 – Golfview Rd. – Mark Scriver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have two Sandhill Cranes that I’ve seen twice and heard once in the past week. I have cranes here every spring, summer and fall, but am surprised that they’d be around at this time of the year.  Leo Condon, 947 Douro 4th Line 

Sandhill Cranes – Wendy Leszkowicz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Jan 23, 2018 07:49 by Scott Gibson
– Downtown – Robinson Place roof, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “feeding on pigeon on corner of roof”

Peregrine perched on steel girder – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
– Reported Jan 22, 2018 08:50 by Ben Taylor
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42155983
– Comments: “Continuing bird,”

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (2)
– Reported Jan 21, 2018 14:12 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42151124
– Comments: “Continuing birds: male and female”

Female Red-breasted Merganser (Karl Egressy)

Red-breasted Merganser on Otonabee River -Tom Northey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) (1)
– Reported Jan 21, 2018 14:20 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Otonabee River (Lock 19), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42151121
– Comments: “Continuing bird. Only male seen, among mallards just below lock on west side of river”

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (2)
– Reported Jan 21, 2018 16:15 by René Gareau
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Heard an owl calling, and 20 min. later located two great horned owls approx. 50 ft up a tree in north-east portion of Harper Park (south of Holy Cross school running track) at approx. 5:00 p.m. on Jan. 21.” 

Great Horned Owl – Karl Egressy

Harper Park in the south end of Peterborough is a natural treasure – Drew Monkman

Jan 112018
 

The annual Christmas Bird Count reveals the ups and downs of bird populations – and always some surprises.

Between mid-December and early January, birders in more than 2,500 localities across North, Central and South America take a break from the holiday festivities to spend a day outside, identifying and counting birds. Dating all the way back to 1900, the Christmas Bird Count is probably the longest-running Citizen Science project in the world. The information collected by thousands of volunteer participants forms one of the world’s largest sets of wildlife survey data.

One of the most interesting trends the numbers show is the decades-long northward march of the Mourning Dove, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Carolina Wren, Northern Mockingbird, Tufted Titmouse and Northern Cardinal. Mourning Doves, for example, were extremely rare in the northern states and Canada until the 1960s, and it was only in the 1970s that their numbers really increased. All of these species used to be restricted to the southern U.S. Their range extension northward is most likely the result of a combination of milder winters and more people feeding birds.

The counts are organized at the local level, often by a birding club or naturalist organization. The count area is a circle, measuring 24 kilometres in diameter. The circle is then sub-divided into sectors, each of which is covered by a different group of birders. The basic idea is to identify and count – as accurately as possible – every bird seen or heard.

Once again this year, two local counts were held – one centred in Peterborough and the other in Petroglyphs Provincial Park. The Petroglyphs Count circle can be viewed at bit.ly/2EfuPt8. Martin Parker of the Peterborough Field Naturalists organized the Peterborough count, while Colin Jones was in charge of the Petroglyphs count.

Ruffed Grouse – Jeff Keller

Peterborough Count

The 66th Peterborough Christmas Bird Count was held December 17 under cold but sunny conditions. Seventy-one members and friends of the Peterborough Field Naturalists spent all or part of the day in the field, while 10 others kept track of birds visiting their feeders.

By the end of the day, participants had found 13,166 individual birds of 60 species. A pair of Fox Sparrows and a Sandhill Crane were new to the count. Both of these migratory species should have left the Kawarthas well before mid-December. At the compilation dinner after the count, Scott McKinlay described his group found and identified the crane. “I saw this bird through my scope from a considerable distance – maybe a kilometre – as it flew low over an open field in full sunlight. It had broad wings and the slow, arching wing beats typical of large herons and cranes. It was clearly brown in colour. I was reluctant to call it as a Sandhill because of the distance and time of year, but nothing else fit. A short time later, I reunited with the rest of the group, who had been surveying the area in the direction of my sighting. Before I uttered a word, they yelled out, “I think we saw a Sandhill Crane!” They described it as being the size of a Great Blue Heron with an outstretched neck, long trailing legs and flying low over a field in my direction. All three were adamant, however, that it was not a heron.”

Sandhill Crane (Wikimedia)

Record high numbers were tallied on the count for Cooper’s Hawk (12), Bald Eagle (13), Red-bellied Woodpecker (16), Pileated Woodpecker (28), Dark-eyed Junco (731) and Northern Cardinal (144). Previous highs were tied for Merlin (3) and Peregrine Falcon (1). The 466 Blue Jays tallied was three short of the previous high of 469.

There were also some notable low numbers. As has been the pattern in recent years, Great Horned Owls (2 vs. 40 in 1992), Ruffed Grouse (17 vs. 82 in 1979) and House Sparrows (181 vs. 2209 in 1981) were conspicuous by their relative absence. It is well known fact that Ruffed Grouse numbers fluctuate a great deal from year to year and even decade to decade. However, the factors responsible for these periodic fluctuations remain poorly understood. Road mortality and changes in habitat, especially south of the Canadian Shield, probably play a role, as well. These include forest fragmentation and fewer early-successional, aspen-dominated forest blocks. Ruffed Grouse are only capable of relatively short flights.

The decline of Great Horned Owls is another mystery. The Canadian population has dropped by over 70% since the 1960s. Collisions with vehicles and high mortality of fledged young due to starvation are acknowledged as playing an important roles. Declines in principal prey species, such as cottontails, hares and rodents (e.g., a big drop in muskrat numbers) may be a contributing factor.

Great Horned Owl – Drew Monkman

The downturn in House Sparrow populations, however, may be the biggest enigma. This is evident across the bird’s range, which includes every continent except Antarctica. The cause or causes are not yet known. In rural areas, it may be that changes in agricultural practices have resulted in fewer nesting sites and less food availability. In northeastern North America, it also been postulated that competition with a relatively new arrival, the House Finch, is a playing a role. However, House Finches have also been declining for a number of years. Only 181 were found this year, which is about one tenth of the record high of 1197.

Finally, not a single American Kestrel was found on the count. It is estimated that the continent-wide population of this small falcon has declined by about 50% since 1966. Part of the reason may be the felling of standing dead trees on which they depend for nesting sites. Removing hedgerows and brush as part of “clean” farming practices are almost certainly having an effect, too. According to Don Sutherland of the Natural Heritage Information Centre in Peterborough, American Kestrels are still common in parts of northern Ontario, particularly in the Big and Little Clay Belts where agriculture is less intense and there is an abundance of hayfields and pasture.

 

American Kestrel – Nima Taghaboni

The total tally sheet for the Peterborough count is as follows:   Canada Goose 400,  American Black Duck 8, Mallard 964,  Bufflehead 2, Common Goldeneye 100, Hooded Merganser 1, Common Merganser 7, Ruffed Grouse 17, Wild Turkey 223, Sharp-shinned Hawk  2, Cooper’s Hawk 12, Bald Eagle 13, Red-tailed Hawk 49, Sandhill Crane 1, Ring-billed Gull 9, Herring Gull 121, Glaucous Gull 1, Iceland Gull 1, Great Black-backed Gull 1, Rock Pigeon 1680, Mourning Dove 1088, Eastern Screech-Owl 2, Great Horned Owl 2, Snowy Owl 1, Belted Kingfisher 1, Red-bellied Woodpecker 16, Downy Woodpecker 90, Hairy Woodpecker 62, Northern Flicker 1, Pileated Woodpecker 28, Merlin 3, Peregrine 1, Northern Shrike 8, Blue Jay 466, American Crow 612, Common Raven 9, Black-capped Chickadee 2065, Red-breasted Nuthatch 27, White-breasted Nuthatch 88, Brown Creeper 7, Golden-crowned Kinglet 28, American Robin 181,  European Starling 2227, Cedar Waxwing 115, Snow Bunting 143, American Tree Sparrow 439, Dark-eyed Junco 731, Fox Sparrow 2, Song Sparrow 1, White-throated Sparrow 5,  Northern Cardinal 144, Red-winged Blackbird 2, Brown-headed Cowbird 1,  House Finch 181, Purple Finch 2, White-winged Crossbill 1, Pine Siskin 99, American Goldfinch 424 and House Sparrow 181.  A Northern Harrier, Ring-necked Pheasant and Carolina Wren were also seen during the count period but not on the day of the count.

Petroglyph Count

            The 32nd Petroglyph Christmas Bird Count took place on December 27, in frigid weather conditions. The 24 participants braved temperatures of close to -30 C in the early morning and only -18 by mid-afternoon. Despite the weather, 32 species and 1826 individual birds were tallied, which is close to the 10-year average of 33.5 species and 2,248 individuals. There was virtually no open water, however, and therefore no waterbirds.

Although no new species were recorded or records broken, there were some notable results. An above-average 7 Bald Eagles, 146 Red-breasted Nuthatches, 122 American Tree Sparrows and 134 Dark-eyed Juncos were counted. A Gray Jay was also located in a bog along the Sandy Lake Road south of Lasswade. Up until 2009, this species was recorded annually but since then only observed in 2014 and during the week of the count in 2016. Two other birds of note were an immature Golden Eagle seen soaring over the Kawartha Nordic Ski Trails near Haultain and a Black-backed Woodpecker in Petroglyphs Provincial Park.

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

As for winter finches, 41 Red Crossbills and 8 White-winged Crossbills turned up, some of which were singing! These birds will nest in any month of the year if sufficient food is available. This year, nearly all of our conifers produced a bumper seed crop. Crossbills feed almost exclusively on conifer seeds. Two Purple Finch, 114 Pine Siskin, 103 American Goldfinch and 2 Evening Grosbeak rounded out the finch count.

The total  tally sheet for the Petroglyph count is as follows: Ruffed Grouse 7, Wild Turkey 40,  Bald Eagle 7, Red-tailed Hawk 2, Golden Eagle 1, Rock Pigeon 10, Mourning Dove 9, Barred Owl 1, Downy Woodpecker 25, Hairy Woodpecker 39, Black-backed Woodpecker 1, Pileated Woodpecker 11, Gray Jay 1, Blue Jay 206, American Crow 4, Common Raven 42, Black-capped Chickadee 641, Red-breasted Nuthatch 146, White-breasted Nuthatch 40, Brown Creeper 17, Golden-crowned Kinglet 32, American Robin 2, European Starling 10, Cedar Waxwing 6, American Tree Sparrow 122, Dark-eyed Junco 134, Purple Finch 2, Red Crossbill 41, White-winged Crossbill 8, Pine Siskin 114, American Goldfinch 103, and Evening Grosbeak 2.

 

 

Backyard Count

If you are inspired by the Christmas Bird Count and want to contribute to Citizen Science yourself – and maybe introduce your children or grandchildren to birding – consider taking part in the Great Backyard Bird Count. It takes place February 16-19 and anyone can participate. Simply tally the numbers and kinds of birds you see for at least 15 minutes on one or more days of the count. You can do so from any location. Go to gbbc.birdcount.org for details. To see the results of last year’s count, visit gbbc.birdcount.org/2017-gbbc-summary/

 

 

 

Jan 032018
 

I am quite sure I spotted an Elk in an open field on Jan. 6, 2018. It was just east of the village of Warkworth on County Road 29 (north side) around 11:45 am.  Doug McNabb

Elk – Division Road east of Peterborough – October 19, 2013 – John Morrit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl (Great Horned) (Bubo virginianus [virginianus Group]) (1)
– Reported Jan 04, 2018 14:00 by Matthew Tobey
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “North end of the park, being harassed by ~12 American Crows”

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (2)
– Reported Dec 30, 2017 14:30 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Rotary Park & Walkway, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “one being mobbed by chickadees near the gate at Hazlitt, another being mobbed by crows at the same time closer to the river near the London St. bridge.”

Barred Owl – Quarry Bay – Tim Dyson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Jan 03, 2018 09:15 by Ben Taylor
– Town Ward, Peterborough, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Being harassed by 2 crows in a tree by the west side of the Holiday Inn pedestrian bridge. Flew off across the river to the point (southwest).”

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC – Stephanie Pineau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) (1)
– Reported Jan 02, 2018 12:00 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – Edgewater road and Railway, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Adult on ice in front of marina with HERG. White head. Similar size and colour to HERG but primaries mostly white with some grey. (pale end of kumleini spectrum)”

Iceland Gull (Crossley Guide) First winter bird is lower left. Some are browner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trumpeter Swans (Observed Jan. 1) I was driving up Water St. today and was surprised to see an adult Trumpeter Swan swimming with 3 large immature birds. They were in the open water below the dam at the zoo. The young ones were as big as the adult.  Bill Astell

Adult Trumpeter Swans and four immatures – Oct. 14, 2012 – Bethany, ON – Paul Anderson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pileated Woodpecker (Observed Jan. 2) This must be my lucky week; I sighted a Pileated Woodpecker at 2:00 PM in the lower part of Burnham’s Woods today. I hear them from time to time but rarely see them. Ross Jamieson

Pileated Woodpecker 2 – Jan. 1, 2016 – Mark St. Peterborough – Helen Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagle (Observed Jan. 2) I was driving to work yesterday morning at 8:25am, and as I was crossing the Hunter Street Bridge a Bald Eagle flew over the bridge (quite low), heading south down the Otonabee River. It was unbelievable! Thought I’d let you know in the event there were other sightings.  Sarah Gencey

Bald Eagle – Jan. 14, 2014 – in flight over Woodland Drive – Bill Astell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker (Observed Jan. 2 & 3) Female seen in trees at house at 85 Kelleher Rd, Campbellford. There was one all last winter, too. Don Munro

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker – Campbellford – January 2017 – Don Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon (North American) (Falco peregrinus anatum) (1)
– Reported Jan 01, 2018 14:22 by Luke Berg
– Luke’s Yard, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Hunting pigeons over the backyard and George street. ”

Peregrine – Karl Egressy

Sep 242017
 

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) (1)
– Reported Sep 22, 2017 08:09 by McLean Smith
– 2 Woodland Dr, Peterborough CA-ON (44.3634,-78.2926), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.363432,-78.292649&ll=44.363432,-78.292649
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39331356
– Comments: “I am not 100% certain as to the ID of this bird, but based on size, shape, and colouration, I am fairly confident in calling it a juvenile Northern Mockingbird. It was perched atop a spruce tree showing a bay to grey overall colouring, with faint mottling on the upper breast and a very faint eye line, with no other discernible features (I did not see it fly to confirm white patches). The only alternative ID I can think of is a juvenile Northern Shrike, but the head appeared too small in relation to the body. Any help or local checklists to confirm or deny would be much appreciated. ”

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Sep 22, 2017 06:12 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Yard – Bear Creek Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5064687,-78.4726858&ll=44.5064687,-78.4726858
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39326314
– Comments: “Hooting to the south”

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (2)
– Reported Sep 21, 2017 17:00 by Chris Risley
– Cottage at Stumpy Bay, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.7255067,-78.2984622&ll=44.7255067,-78.2984622
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39326758
– Comments: “calling across Stumpy Bay”

Feb 222017
 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Feb 21, 2017 00:24 by Scott Gibson
– 1_Gibson Home – Bissonnette Dr., Peterborough, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “actively calling…loud enough to wake me up.”

Great Horned Owls usually call in the evening and again just before dawn – Karl Egressy

Dec 232016
 

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (1)
– Reported Dec 18, 2016 04:00 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – CBC Area 3 (Wedge from river to cty rd 4), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Responded to whinnying playback. In area near Water St N. Tim Hortons.”

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Dec 18, 2016 04:00 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – CBC Area 3 (Wedge from river to cty rd 4), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Calling at University Rd Wetland 4:10am”

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Dec 22, 2016 10:10 by Kyle Cameron
– CA-Ontario- KLT Blue Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Dec 22, 2016 08:45 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – Robinson Place, Charlotte St. at George St., Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Adult flew up onto the building”

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon - Loree Stephens 2 - Jan. 13, 2015 - PRHC

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens  – Jan. 13, 2015 – Peterborough Regional Health Centre

Barred Owl - Karl Egressy

Barred Owl – Karl Egressy

Great Horned Owl - Fleming Campus in Peterborough - Drew Monkman

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

Eastern Screech-owl - Beaches area of Toronto - via Jamie Brockley

Eastern Screech-owl – Beaches area of Toronto – via Jamie Brockley

Dec 192016
 

After reading your column last week I was reminded of a very special visitor in my backyard on December 23, 2015. The bird spent the day in our locust tree. It was the first time that I have actually seen a Great Horned Owl.  They are magnificent birds.  Thought you might like to see him too.

Glen Grills, Tindle Bay

Great Horned Owl close-up - Dec. 23, 2015 - Glen Grills

Great Horned Owl close-up – Dec. 23, 2015 – Glen Grills

Great Horned Owl - Dec. 23, 2015 - Glen Grills

Great Horned Owl – Dec. 23, 2015 – Glen Grills

 

Nov 202016
 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Nov 15, 2016 21:00 by Jeff Stewart
– 621 Carveth Drive, Millbrook, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32578096
– Comments: “heard hooting near house by Annie”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Nov 16, 2016 12:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Rotary Park & Walkway, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32585899
– Comments: “watching ducks closely from a snag over the river”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Nov 16, 2016 08:30 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Greyhound Bus Station, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32577711
– Comments: “Flying NW across downtown, large falcon, direct flight, stiff powerful wingbeats”

Peregrine - Karl Egressy

Peregrine – Karl Egressy

Great Horned Owl - Fleming Campus in Peterborough - Drew Monkman

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon - Loree Stephens 2 - Jan. 13, 2015 - PRHC

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens 2 – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

Sep 262016
 

Eastern Screech-Owl (Northern) (Megascops asio [asio Group]) (1)
– Reported Sep 25, 2016 20:16 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough–Mervin Line, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Singing on the south side of the road about 200m west of the east end of the road. ”

Great Horned Owl (Great Horned) (Bubo virginianus [virginianus Group]) (1)
– Reported Sep 25, 2016 20:16 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough–Mervin Line, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Seen perched on the telephone wires along the side of the road as we drove in. ”

Great Horned Owl - Fleming Campus in Peterborough - Drew Monkman

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

Eastern Screech-owl - Feb. 24, 2015 - Michael Gillespie

Eastern Screech-owl – Feb. 24, 2015 – Michael Gillespie

May 212016
 

Wilson’s Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor) (1)
– Reported May 21, 2016 08:26 by Bill Crins
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “slim dark beak, white throat, white rump when flying, dark legs, relatively uniformly gray back and wings, suffused orange stripe and dark grayish stripe on side of neck, dark line through eye; feeding on mud/algae/flotsam at SE. corner of N. pond”

Wilson's Phalarope (Photo by Ann Hough)

Wilson’s Phalarope (Photo by Ann Hough)

 

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (2)
– Reported May 18, 2016 15:36 by Warren Dunlop
– Peterborough–Ponds west of 1111 Johnston Dr, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

 

Blue-winged Teal - Wikimedia

Blue-winged Teal – Wikimedia

Sora (Porzana carolina) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2016 18:16 by Donald Sutherland
– Lakefield–Centre Road at Douro Line 3, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29808192

 

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (5)
– Reported May 21, 2016 08:26 by Bill Crins
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29815760

 

Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) (1)
– Reported May 21, 2016 09:32 by Donald Sutherland
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29811412

 

Semipalmated Sandpipers - Drew Monkman

Semipalmated Sandpipers – Drew Monkman

Great Horned Owl (Great Horned) (Bubo virginianus [virginianus Group]) (2)
– Reported May 18, 2016 08:31 by Mike V.A. Burrell
– Peterborough–Trent University Wildlife Sanctuary Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29801509
– Comments: “Adult and downy young on nest.”

 

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (5)
– Reported May 18, 2016 07:36 by Donald Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29808077

 

Cliff Swallow building nest - Wikimedia

Cliff Swallow building nest – Wikimedia

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2016 16:38 by Warren Dunlop
– Peterborough–Squirrel Creek at 4th Line Bridge, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29814171
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “Heard calling, and then observed foraging high in canopy of Silver Maple.”

 

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Karl Egressy

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – Karl Egressy

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (2)
– Reported May 19, 2016 08:17 by Donald Sutherland
– Tates Bridge–Tates Rd at Miskwaa Ziibi (river), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29809648
– Comments: “singing, alder thicket floodplain swamp; both GWWA song-types with one responding positively to call broadcasts approaching to within 25 m and by plumage appearing to be pure.”

 

Golden-winged Warbler (Brendan Boyd)

Golden-winged Warbler (Brendan Boyd)

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
– Reported May 19, 2016 04:58 by Donald Sutherland
– Beaver Lake Road, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29809566
– Comments: “singing constantly in regenerating salvage cut/blow-down just W Catchacoma Narrows”

Cape May Warbler - Jeff Keller - May 5, 2015

Cape May Warbler – Jeff Keller – May 5, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) (1)
– Reported May 19, 2016 09:07 by Donald Sutherland
– Deer Bay Reach Road, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29809709
– Comments: “singing, E side road”

 

Cerulean Warbler (Karl Egressy)

Cerulean Warbler (Karl Egressy)

Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2016 19:33 by Donald Sutherland
– Centre Dummer Road at Douro Line 7, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29808283
– Comments: “singing, in response to call broadcast, continued singing during nearly entire visit. Several parted buzzy song, at one point singing from split rail fence within 3-4 m of observers.”

 

Orchard Oriole - Wikimedia

Orchard Oriole – Wikimedia

Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) (1)
– Reported May 15, 2016 15:29 by Warren Dunlop
– Rice Lake–Hall Landing, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29814497
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Male. First observed with male BAOR in shrub on west side of road and subsequently visiting hummingbird feeder at #115.”

 

Mar 202016
 

I  found a dead Great Horned Owl on our property in Lakefield. It had a tag on its leg (#788-30808). I went on-line to https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/bblretrv/ and was able to find the following information:

Species: Great Horned Owl
Date banded: 03/16/2009
Banding Location: 5 KM N OF LAKEFIELD, ONTARIO, CANADA
Age: HATCHED IN 2007 OR EARLIER
Sex: UNKNOWN

This means the bird was at least eight years old!

Ashley Holland   a_holland@live.ca  (705-652-3845)

Banded dead GHOW - March 19, 2016 - Lakefield - Ashley Holland

Banded dead GHOW – March 19, 2016 – Lakefield – Ashley Holland

Banded dead GHOW - March 19, 2016 - Lakefield - Ashley Holland-2.jpeg

Banded dead GHOW – March 19, 2016 – Lakefield – Ashley Holland-2.jpeg

Great Horned Owl - Fleming Campus in Peterborough - Drew Monkman

Great Horned Owl – Fleming Campus in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

Dec 312014
 

The Petroglyph’s Christmas Bird Count, centered on Petroglyph’s Provincial Park, was held on Saturday, December 27, 2014.  Twenty-seven birders took part. 2717 individual birds were counted.

Number of species: 38 (Just two shy of the record high of 40.)

Species recorded in a record high number: Red-tailed Hawk (10 vs previous high of 8), Herring Gull (8 vs 5), Great Horned Owl (3 vs 1), Barred Owl (11 vs 7), White-breasted Nuthatch (233 vs 119)

New species for the Count: Eastern Screech Owl (2), Merlin (1)

First time since 2009 (previously annual): Gray Jay (2)

Also of note:  1 Sharp-shinned Hawk (2cd time on Count),  5 Bald Eagles (average), 48 Downy Woodpecker (considerably higher than average), 456 Blue Jays (high), 43 Red-breasted Nuthatches (very low), 1 Winter Wren (only 4th time on Count), 106 Golden-crowned Kinglets (close to previous high of 120), 48 American Goldfinch (very low)

Colin Jones, co-ordinator

Merlin (Karl Egressy)

Merlin (Karl Egressy)

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park - March 2014

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014