Jul 262019
 

20th Annual Petroglyphs Butterfly Count: The compiling of the July 21st butterfly count is finally finished  and final results have been submitted to the North America Butterfly Association. A total of 55 species were recorded, slightly above the average for the last few years. The Indian Skipper found in the Park area was a new species for this count.  The slow arrival of spring was a factor. The number of Monarchs (472) was very encouraging. Although the number of Dun Skippers (1,459) was well below the 4900+ seen last year, according to count compiler Jerry Ball, it will still be a continental high. The ten most common species were: Dun Skippers (1,459), Monarchs (472), Northern Crescent (304), European Skipper (286), Broad-winged Skipper (165), Eyed-brown (86), Mulberry Wing Skipper (61), White Admiral (51), Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (23), and Acadian Hairstreak (23).  Martin Parker 

Full count results (1)

Full count results (2)

 

White Admiral – Robin Blake

European Skipper – Drew Monkman

 

 

Tiger Swallowtail – Robin Blake

Dun Skipper – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Dobsonfly: We have never see a bug this big in our lives !! It was enormous. It was stuck to the patio screen. I gently swept it off the patio screen and it landed on the patio. The wing cover was a sliver and blended well with the patio bricks. Any clue what this “ginormous” creature is? Gord Young, Armour Road, Peterborough

Note: Your visitor was a male Eastern Dobsonfly. They average about 12 cm (5 inches) long! In the larval stage, they’re called hellgrammites and are/used to be (?) a popular bait. The larvae live in water, so I suspect this adult would have emerged from the Otonabee River. The males can’t bite, but the females, who have only tiny pincers, apparently can.

Male Dobsonfly – July 26, 2019 – Armour Road, PTBO – Gord Young

 

 

Female Eastern Dobsonfly (Rick Kemp)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sora (Porzana carolina) (1)
– Reported Jul 23, 2019 11:30 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Sora (rail) – Wikimeda

Clay-colored Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida) (1)
– Reported Jul 22, 2019 12:35 by Kathryn Sheridan
– Lakefield Water Tower, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Continuing”

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) (2)
– Reported Jul 22, 2019 15:04 by Dan Chronowic
– Peterborough–Trent University Wildlife Sanctuary Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Continuing. Adults. In wetland off blue trail. Seen together at top of snag.”

Red-headed Woodpecker – Greg Piatsetzki

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20th Petroglyphs Butterfly Count: This year’s butterfly count, held on July 21st, produced 55 species. The average is 51 species. The big news, however, was the 472 Monarchs we found (vs. 249 in 2018 & just 65 in 2017). With no special searching, we also found 11 Monarch larvae. Many thanks to Martin Parker & Jerry Ball for organizing the event.  Drew Monkman

Monarchs on Joe-Pye Weed – August 2018 – Peter Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sightings from the Indian River, north of Warsaw: 

Today, July 25, I found a new caterpillar, a Hitched Arches Moth Caterpillar (Melanchra adjuncta) all curled up on a leaf of a flowering Common Bleeding Heart.

And while I was pruning a lilac bush I came across a tiny mystery creature about a centimeter long.  Unfortunately it fell to the ground while I was trying to photograph it, but it was easier to get a picture on the rough grass.  It is somewhat similar to a pseudoscorpion in both size and the presence of a pair of pincers but it also has two “tails” that  pseudoscorpions do not have.  Despite lengthy searches on the web, I cannot identify a name.  It is a lovely shade of dark blue.
On Monday, July 22, we found three tiny Monarch caterpillars on a lone Common Milkweed that had self-seeded among a jumble of vetch, umbellifers and Bird’s-foot Trefoil near the river. And yesterday, there was another one on a Milkweed in the graveled turning circle. Here’s hoping for a ‘bumper crop’.

We also spotted a Golden-rod Crab Spider, probably a female, on the flower head of a Queen Ann’s Lace. I’ve never been a spider enthusiast, but this one was so pretty. And I’ve discovered it has one remarkable characteristic. It can change colour from yellow to white and vice versa depending on the flower it’s on, though it may take from one day to twenty to make the change. Goldenrod flowers and milkweed are common hosts.

On June 30, an Eight-spotted Forester Moth (Alypia octomaculata) alighted on one of our windows facing the river. Clean windows mean bird strikes so the image isn’t as crisp as it might be. The moth feeds on Virginia Creeper and the grape vine and is often mistaken for a butterfly because it visits flowers during the day.

About this time our neighbours were having some roof work done and an Eastern Phoebe nest was removed from a window ledge that was thought to be empty as the young had already fledged. Sadly the nest contained a second clutch of eggs. With all the handling it was decided not to put it back. The construction of the nest is a wonder to behold.

We now have three protected Painted Turtle nests. At least 2 of these nests definitely have eggs as a skunk has been trying to dig round the chicken wire. And there was a fourth nest that had been dug out with eggs shells and 4 tiny dead Painted Turtles, all rather desiccated, lying near the hole. The next day the turtles were gone, presumably eaten by the skunk. This must have been a nest from last year.

We also have one protected Snapping Turtle nest. Hopefully her nest has eggs this time but she’s fooled us before, digging an obvious second nest to distract attention from a well-covered first nest that does contain her eggs.

Lastly we spotted a mall American Toad amongst leaf litter in a wooded area. We don’t see this toad very often.   Stephenie and Peter Armstrong, Warsaw

Eight-spotted Forester Moth – Stephenie Armstrong

Dead baby Painted Turtles in nest – June 2019 – Stephenie Armstrong

Nest of Eastern Phoebe – Stephenie Armstrong

Goldenrod Crab spider on Queen Anne’s Lace – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hitched Arches Moth Caterpillar – Stephenie Armstrong

Recently emerged Monarch caterpillar – July 2019 – Peter Armstrong

 

Mystery insect – July 2019 – Stephenie Armstrong

Leucistic Common Grackle: I took these photos of a leucistic Common Grackle feeding its fledgling in my backyard today, July 12. It hung around the feeder most of the day. I live on County Road 36. Sharon Watson, Lindsay.

Leucistic grackle feeding fledgling – Lindsay, ON – July 12, 2019 – Sharon Watson

Leucistic Common Grackle 2 – Lindsay, ON – July 12, 2019 – Sharon Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent photos from Mike Faught: I took the photos of the Great Blue Heron nest in the Trent Wildlife Sanctuary. The Merlins are using the tree just off our balcony on Reid Street in Peterborough to exchange prey that they’ve caught. We see them doing this five or six times a day! Mike Faught

Merlins exchanging food – July 2019 – Peterborough – Mike Faught

Merlin with prey – July 2019 – Peterborough – Mike Faught

Great Blue Herons on nest – Trent Wildlife Sanctuary – June 2019 – Mike Faught

Osprey carrying sucker – June 2019 – Mike Faught

Osprey feeding young – June 2019 – Mike Faught

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albino Raccoon:  Here are a couple of photos of an albino Raccoon that a Peterborough resident shared with me. It turned up in his neighbourhood near Little Lake in early July.

Albino Raccoon – July 2019 – Little Lake, Peterborough

Albino Raccoon near Little Lake – July 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) (1)
– Reported Jul 03, 2019 09:30 by Chris Ellingwood
– Highway 36, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “calling from private access lane-distinct western song, very loud and melodious whistle and warble call. Bird similar in physical appearance to eastern meadowlark in same field. Call notable.
Back off of Highway 36 on private property. May be hearable from road near Flynn’s Turn.”

Jun 102019
 

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (1)
– Reported Jul 01, 2019 04:39 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Chase Memorial Park, Gannons Narrows, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Eastern Screech owl – red phase – 9th Line of Selwyn Twsp – March 11, 2017 – Kathy McCue

Red-headed Woodpecker – May 28, 2017 – Buckhorn Lake -Nima Taghaboni

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) (2)
– Reported Jun 27, 2019 11:00 by Dave Milsom
– Peterborough–Trent University Canal Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “2 birds seen well. Nest detected in slim dead tree.”

Upland Sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) (2)
– Reported Jun 27, 2019 14:35 by Brian Wales
– Dummer Alvar, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57753148

Greg Piasetzki – Upland Sandpiper

Cliff Swallow building nest – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (35)
– Reported Jun 27, 2019 11:00 by Brian Wales
– Peterborough–Trent University Canal Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57753081
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “approximately 80 nests under footbridge over canal”

Canada Tiger Swallowtail:  I got this shot on Sunday, June 23, on Lower Buckhorn Lake. Robin Blake

Canada Tiger Swallowtail – Robin Blake

Red-headed Woodpecker on River Road, near Hastings – Don Pettypiece

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) (1)
– Reported Jun 23, 2019 11:00 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Trent University Wildlife Sanctuary Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “red head, black back and wings, white primaries; seen 70 m N of old boardwalk SE from Blue trail; observed sallying from dead trees”

Blue-winged Warbler and Clay-coloured Sparrow
– Reported Jun 19, 2019 05:15 by Geoff Carpentier
– 1232 Peterborough County Road 10, Fraserville, Ontario, CA (44.181, -78.461), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Blue-winged Warbler – Wikimedia

Clay-colored Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Merganser family parade:  As I was working on my dock at the top of Lake Muskoka a couple of days ago, I heard a ruckus, ran up to the cottage for my camera, and managed to get a couple of shots of a mom and her babes out for a paddle.  When one on her back dropped off, another would climb on. All the while she merrily paddled along. Greg Piasetzki, Lake Muskoka

Note: Female Common Mergansers are famous for adopting abandoned or lost ducklings from another female merganser’s brood. They will also lay some of their own eggs in another female’s nest -sometimes even that of a different duck species. Check out this article. D.M.

Female Common Merganser with 12 ducklings – June 17, 2019 – Muskoka – Greg Piasetzki

Female Common Merganser with ducklings on her back – June 17, 2019 – Muskoka – Greg Piasetzki

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Blue Herons nesting: The heronry on Deer Bay Reach (Lower Buckhorn) now has about ten nests, all in use high in the pines. They’re on the secluded side of Three Islands, accessible by canoe or kayak once you get to that part of the lake. Ospreys used to nest here. Now one occupies a nest atop a lone dead pine at the west end of Three Islands facing Buckhorn. Three Bald Eagles (one adult, two juveniles) have been seen at their old nest at the northeast end of Black Duck Bay, toward the dams into Lovesick.  Janet Duval

Great Blue Heron nest at Trent Wildlife Sanctuary -June 28, 2016 – Tim Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robins nesting: I thought you might like to see our new neighbors. Clever place to put their nest, which is safe between the two downspouts. They christened our new fencing too! Clever critters they are.
We have a great influx of tent caterpillars, so that is helping things along. Gord Young, Peterborough

American Robin nest – June 18, 2019 – Gord Young

 

 

 

 

 

Polyphemus Moth: Late last summer I almost stepped on this big green caterpillar on my front walk. It carried on its way and I thought that was the end of it. On June 12 I came home to see a freshly emerged Polyphemus Moth hanging by my garage door. The caterpillar I saw was actually a Polyphemus caterpillar, probably one and the same! Kim Mitchell, Maple Dr., Ennismore 

Polyphemus caterpillar – Kim Mitchell

Polyphemus adult – Kim Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon nest: John and I canoed to the cliff on Anstruther Lake yesterday. An adult Peregrine flew off the nest to a branch of a pine tree, and we could see, very clearly, two young ones sitting on the nest looking like fluffy ookpiks. They were already a fair size and quite active. The day before, standing on the dock, we heard falcons calling. We then saw two adults coming, and just as they were above our heads they joined their talons, while flying, and tumbled down a few feet. Then, one went in the direction of the nest and the other went back were it came from. We were lucky us to be able to witness this! Marie Duchesneau

Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) (1)
– Reported Jun 16, 2019 09:05 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Deer Bay Reach Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5740226,-78.2863426&ll=44.5740226,-78.2863426
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57419901
– Comments: “Singing spontaneously around 100 m E of utility pole AET27J (3232/4777) by old bench S of #155 at 09:28 h, then on W edge of road singing from large red oak just S of 50 kph sign.”

Cerulean Warbler (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (1)
– Reported Jun 12, 2019 15:00 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough–Mervin Line, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Known location. Regular at several locations in the county during the summer.”

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandhill Cranes: I had a pair of Sandhills fly over my house at 11:35 am on June 11. They were going north. Gavin Hunter, Omemee 

Sandhill Cranes – Sept. 2018 – Lindsay area – Tim Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-winged Teal (Spatula discors) (1)
– Reported Jun 09, 2019 16:10 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57245041

Blue-winged Teal – Wikimedia

Greg Piasetzki – Upland Sandpiper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upland Sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) (2)
– Reported Jun 09, 2019 07:05 by Dave Milsom
– Dummer Alvar, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57234017
– Comments: “flew across back of field, then one landed on fence post: 1.4 kms. north of railroad on County Road 38”

Jul 292018
 

Another fox in city dining on Gray Squirrels

There was a large number of squirrels in our neighbourhood. Then came a large, gray-coloured fox, easily the size of my fifty pound Springer Spaniel. I’d often see it at first light, and thrice seen carrying a black-phase Gray Squirrel. The squirrel population has dropped dramatically. As of July 23, I have not seen the fox for about three weeks. I presume he has moved on to another neighbourhood where the roof rabbit harvest is more promising. When I first saw the fox, I was not sure what I was looking at.  I thought perhaps it was a coyote/fox hybrid, but that probably does not happen.  Larry Love, Norwood Terrace, Peterborough

P.S. By the way, there is lots of Black Bear activity in Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park.  Last Thursday while stopping for dinner on Campsite 301 (Wolf Lake) I  saw a handwritten “Bear Warning” note, concerning a juvenile nuisance bear.  The sign was tacked to a tree at the site.   During our two hour stay, there were a number of gawkers who came into the bay to see if there was a bear around.  One kayaker told me about an MNR culvert trap set on a cottager’s property, not far from Site 301.   Two years ago, I put a small bear off of an adjacent island.  He had been gorging on blueberries.  The bears are everywhere in KHPP, but this boldness is new.

Red-headed Woodpecker at Gannons Narrow (July 21)  This is the first year we have ever seen one in the area. He has been around since early June and just in the last week or so has found our black oil sunflower seed feeders. He is a feisty fellow who will scare away the other birds and not give way to blackbirds or jays who try to get him to move. Kingsley Hubbs, Gannons Narrows, Selwyn Township

Red-headed Woodpecker – July 2018 – Kingsley Hubbs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-billed Cuckoo near Warsaw:  At around 8 pm this evening (July 20), I heard (twice) the call of a Black-billed Cuckoo in our bush near the Indian River. I didn’t see it, but its call was unmistakable. It moved to 2 different locations within the bush. We’ve been here 19 years and haven’t heard a cuckoo every year.   Jane Bremner

Black-billed Cuckoo – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) (1) from eBird
– Reported Jul 19, 2018 15:13 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Flew out from willow tree on island, landing on dead tree near sand bar. Presumably same individual reported here a few weeks back. ”

Black-crowned Night-Heron – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (4)  from eBird
– Reported Jul 17, 2018 20:50 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “1 adult, 2 young, and presumably a 3rd young calling. Adult giving steady hoot calls similar to NSOW, but mixed with clicking and whinnies. In ecology park hopping around. Seen previous night as well but only as silhouettes. ”

Eastern Screech owl – red phase – 9th Line of Selwyn Twsp – March 11, 2017 – Kathy McCue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our neighbor has a family of Mallards visiting regularly. What is remarkable, however, is that all  of the ducklings have, so far at least, survived. They have survived the Great Blue Heron that has totally cleaned out the Eastern Chipmunk population. Sad. Yeah, I know, nature. But, the maddening part, of course, is that the Great Blue is really, really lazy. He has decided to stop fishing, and go chipmunking!  Gord Young, Armour Road  

Mother Mallard and eight ducklings – Dianne Tyler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have had 3 Pileated Woodpeckers in our yard at the same time this month. However, I couldn’t get all three in the picture below. We know there are a male and a female juvenile, but we’re not sure about how many adults/parents. The Osprey nests around here all seem to only have one baby this year but its really hard to tell. We  watch the nest behind us in the ball diamond, the nest on the Bridgenorth-Selwyn Road, and the one at the corner of Yankee Line and Robinson Road across from the trailer park.  Jennie and Peter Gulliver, Communication Road, Bridgenorth

Two or the three Pileated Woodpeckers in our yard – July 16, 2018 – Jennie Gulliver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On July 12, we were camping on Secret Lake in Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park and saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes and 2 half-grown chicks foraging along a marshy shore. Secret Lake is located north of Long Lake and Loucks Lake. It is reached by a short portage from Loucks Lake. Gary Moloney

Sandhill Crane with chick – Barb Evett – Buckhorn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It seems that my leaving wide swaths of my orchard uncut to establish zones of biodiversity, which  include apple trees, nesting boxes as well as many milkweeds, has paid off. This morning, July 9, I noticed quite a few Monarchs fluttering about and visiting multiple milkweed plants that are happily blooming – having escaped the blades of my bush hog! Michael Gillespie, Keene

Monarch caterpillar on milkweed  – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have lived outside of Millbrook for 20 years & have noticed a large decline in birds and bees. I’ve also seen very few fireflies, whereas they were abundant a few years back.  Ludvik Kouril (July 9)

Photinus pyralis – a common firefly – Art Farmer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have a very large patch of Himalayan Balsam in my backyard. I’ve been fighting this invasive species for years, and I was just about to start pulling these plants out when, on July 7, I saw a Monarch laying eggs on them. Wendy Hicks, Peterborough

 N.B. Don Davis, a Monarch expert, told me that this is very unusual. D.M.

Himalayan Balsam, an invasive species in Ontario – Wikimedia

 

 

Apr 232018
 

Don Munro of Campbellford and Mike Faught of Peterborough shared the following pictures taken this month.

Common Loon with catfish – April 2018 – Don Munro

Wood Duck flying – April 2018 – Don Munro

Great Blue Heron flying – April 2018 – Don Munro

Pileated Woodpecker – April 2018 – Don Munro

Carolina Wren – April 2018 – Don Munro

Horned Grebe in waves – April 2018 – Don Munro

Double-crested Cormorants – April 2018 – Don Munro

Long-tailed Duck in breeding plumage – April 2018 – Don Munro

Lesser Yellowlegs – April 2018 – Don Munro

Ospreys at nest – April 2018 – Mike Faught

Great Blue Heron – Mike Faught

Wood Duck in flight – April 2018 – Mike Faught

 

Jul 062017
 

I have been watching two dark brown juvenile Bald Eagles for three mornings now, sitting on and beside a high nest  in a white pine in Wolf Island Provincial Park on Lower Buckhorn Lake.  They glared at me for about 15 minutes but never left. One of them was in the nest, then sat on the branch with the other one for 10 minutes, then back into the nest, which was getting nice morning sunlight around 9 am. I was in a canoe.

The nest has been there for two or three years. I’ve dropped a Google maps pin in the nest location, and hope it shows you the right spot (big white pine). I can watch the nest from the lake side, and from deep in the bay on the north side, but lakeside is better.

There is now a heronry with three Great Blue Heron nests on Three Islands (west of the eagles) where Ospreys used to nest.
Janet Duval, Deer Bay Reach Road

Juvenile Bald Eagle – Drew Monkman

 

May 032017
 

We were at the Ecology Park on the morning of April 23 and saw this male Yellow-rumped Warbler.  Hallelujah for the return of spring!  Helen and Larry Keller, Mark Street

Yellow-rumped Warbler – Ecology Park – April 23, 2017 – Helen & Larry Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have had a little Chipping Sparrow flying up against our windows over the last 3 days. It sits on the window sills and sliding door frames looking in and sometimes flies at the windows. We would love to know what might be causing this weird behaviour. We’ve also had a male Hairy Woodpecker coming to our feeder. Wendy Marrs, Peterborough

Chipping Sparrow at window – Wendy Marrs

Hairy Woodpecker – Wendy Marrs

 Note: The bird see its reflection in the window, assumes it’s another male in its territoy, and flies up against the window to drive the intruder (its reflection) away. Robins and cardinals often do the same thing. D.M

 

 

 

On April 14th we were sitting on our dock and our neighbour saw a big bird flying to a tree.  We got our spotting scope out and found that there were two Great Blue Herons in a nest in a clump of five pine trees. Later, we discovered that there are actually three nests! Even though we see lots of herons, it is the first time we actually found a nest.  Rosemary and Claudio Rosada, Lower Buckhorn Lake

Great Blue Heron (Paul Anderson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was so excited to see a Ruby-crowned Kinglet in the brushy trees near our house this morning (April 13) -just classic and unmistakable. It had a white eye ring and white wing bars, and he even showed a bit of red on the crown just to be sure!  Jane Bremner, Warsaw

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet has a prominent eye ring. (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Got some great pictures of Ring-necked Ducks and Trumpeter Swans around Lakefield on April 11. Jeff Keller

Ring-necked Ducks – April 11, 2017 – Jeff Keller

Trumpeter Swans – April 11, 2017 – Jeff Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mid-April is my favourite time to be on the island. Silence and not a light to be seen. Today the River Otters were out in force. Running, sliding and feasting on fish.The highlight was a flyby of three swans (Trumpeters?) that were in the duckpond.  Life is good!  Rob Welsh, Stony Lake

River otter eating a fish at Gannon’s Narrows, Buckhorn Lake (by Kinsley Hubbs)

 

 

Stony Lake – April 10, 2017 – Rob Welsh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On April 4, there were 2 Osprey on the nesting platform in Young’s Point. Most of Stony Lake is still frozen but there were pair of absolutely resplendent loons dancing and calling.  Rob Welsh, Stony Lake

Common Loon (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apr 022017
 

April 2 – I heard a Wilson’s Snipe quietly calling in the marshy area on the Parkway trail, east of Chemong, directly underneath the WalMart parking lot. Also, 3 Northern Leopard Frogs hopping along the new not-yet-opened road that skirts east of the airport as well as 3 Killdeer in the adjacent fields.   Marilyn Freeman

Wilson’s Snipe – Greg Piasetzki

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 2 – Cottonwood Drive this morning, we heard a couple of Eastern Phoebes calling. It must be spring! Rob Moos

Eastern Phoebe (David Frank)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 30 – Two Great Blue Herons flying over the Cavan Bog and another north of Whitby.  John Fautley

March 30 – I saw my first Great Blue Heron today. It was flying north over the Otonabee River near Lakefield. Annamarie Beckel

Great Blue Heron – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About 64 third year Trent ecology students surveyed the Otonabee River from Lakefield to south of Lock 19, on March 24th.  From 9:00 am to 10:30 am, they did 8 stations north of Trent and from 1 pm to 3 pm, 8 stations south of Trent. Susan Chow

Here are the results: Bufflehead 95, Canada Geese 141, Common Goldeneye 6, Common Merganser 8, Gadwall 1, Greater Scaup 1, Hooded Merganser 86, Lesser Scaup 7, Long-tailed Duck 5, Mallard 369, Wood Duck 3

Long-tailed-Duck – Mar.22 2014 – Little Lake – – DJ McPhail

 

Male Gadwall (photo from Wikimedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On March 17 and 18, there were 50 to 60 Bohemian Waxwings flying back and forth between the conifers along the Otonabee River and two Siberian crab apple trees. The birds were just north of the Ninth Line.

Susan Chow

Bohemian Waxwing – Cow Island – Jan. 24, 2015 – via Sylvia Cashmore