Jan 212018
 

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (1)
– Reported Jan 20, 2018 14:00 by Alexandra Israel
– Lang Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42106339
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Alerted by mobbing chickadees. Only general location given.”

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Dave Heuft)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gray Jay (Northern) (Perisoreus canadensis [canadensis Group]) (1)
– Reported Jan 20, 2018 10:14 by Kenneth G.D. Burrell
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42093450
– Comments: “Called a few times, Lill spotted it along Trillium just north of Wolf Pond(?). Pretty unexpected!”

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had 16 Purple Finches on my property on January 19.  Don Munro, Campbellford

Purple Finch (male) – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White-winged Crossbill (Loxia leucoptera) (4)
– Reported Jan 18, 2018 11:00 by Scott McKinlay
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42053565
– Comments: “On the Adam Scott trail. They were singing the varied pitch song from spruce trees next to the trail before flying off.”

White-winged Crossbill (female) – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (2)
– Reported Jan 18, 2018 11:00 by Scott McKinlay
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Good views of a male and female that were responding to pishing by calling continuously and flying back and forth between three white pine trees that surrounded me. There was no white at all for either bird on the solid dark wings. The gip gip gip calls were in groups of 2 to 6. These were located about 1/3 of the way along the PT trail, travelling east to west.”

Red Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) (2)
– Reported Jan 19, 2018 12:30 by Tim Haan
– 158 George Street North, Peterborough, Ontario, CA (44.299, -78.318), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Both male and female near the train bridge”

Pair of Northern Pintail – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (3)
– Reported Jan 16, 2018 08:07 by Daniel Williams
– Peterborough–Beavermead Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41958892
– Comments: “Males. Flyover. ”

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Jan 16, 2018 09:44 by Scott Gibson
– 288 Scriven Road, Bailieboro, Ontario, CA (44.146, -78.313), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41959644
– Media: 2 Photos
– Comments: “top of hill in tree beside rd. pics.”

I had a couple of firsts today: first time skiing and first Snowy Owl of the winter. I saw an eBird posting at 11:15 this morning (January 16) and immediately twitched out to see the bird at 11:30 on Scriven Line. I also, watched about 100 Snow buntings for 20 minutes but couldn’t find one Lapland Longspur. Michael Gillespie

Snow Bunting (from Crossley ID Guide)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Jan 15, 2018 09:05 by Chris Risley
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Black head and back with barred sides, hammering on and peeling bark from a red pine. Spotted about 300 meters beyond the park gate.”

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (3)
– Reported Jan 15, 2018 15:17 by Toby Rowland
– Peterborough–Otonabee River (Lock 19), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2879468,-78.3082509&ll=44.2879468,-78.3082509
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41943549
– Comments: “Continuing three slightly worn males just below the lock”

Red-breasted Merganser (male) – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Jan 14, 2018 16:00 by Colin Jones
– Peterborough–Little Lake, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2965341,-78.3105472&ll=44.2965341,-78.3105472
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41908174
– Comments: “Sitting on the water fountain structure in the middle of the lake. Found earlier in the day by Warren Dunlop.”

Ruffed Grouse: I read your recent column on the winter bird counts. What you say about grouse is accurate. I saw one grouse today, whereas normally I would scare up six. The most I have ever seen in one group decades ago was 18 on a rainy day because they don’t like to fly when they are wet. Mel Fee, Cavan

Ruffed Grouse – Parry Sound – via Rob Moos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruffed Grouse: I wanted to comment on the grouse mystery. Growing up on a farm in the 50 & 60s we did hunt locally and there were always an abundance of grouse, hares, jacks and cottontails. Habitat has been reduced in some areas but not in others so what has changed? Coyotes have arrived in great numbers all across southern Ontario. We continually have tracks in our yard. Along with a very healthy Red Fox population I believe that anything nesting on the ground doesn’t have much of a chance. Would be interested to know if other ground nesting birds such as the Killdeer have seen declines. Always enjoy your columns and just to let you know I stopped hunting 50 years ago.  Al Mace, Westview Dr. Omemee

Jan 012018
 

The 32nd Petroglyphs Christmas Bird Count was held on Thursday, December 27, 2017 during very cold conditions. It was nearly -30 degrees C first thing in the morning and only warmed up to about -18 by mid-afternoon.

Participants: 24
Total species: 32 (close to the 10-year average of 33.5)
Total individuals: 1826 (10-year average is 2248)
As a result of the very cold weather there was virtually no open water and therefore no waterbirds.

Notable species and count highs (no new record highs) included:
BALD EAGLE: 7 (slightly higher than average)
GOLDEN EAGLE: 1 sub-adult bird seen soaring over the Kawartha Nordic Ski Trails

BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER: 1 in the Petroglyphs Provincial Park (although previously recorded nearly every year this species has only been detected 3 times in the past 10 years)

GRAY JAY: a single bird was located in a bog along the Sandy Lake Rd (until 2009 recorded annually but since then only recorded in 2014 and during count period in 2016)

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 146 (well above the 10-year average of 87 but nowhere near the count high of 526)

AMERICAN ROBIN: 2 (absent in most years)

CEDAR WAXWING: 6  (absent in most years)

AMERICAN TREE SPARROW: 122 (well above the 10-year average of 18; count high is 218)
DARK-EYED JUNCO: 134 (well above the 10-year average of 12 and near count high of 168)

American Tree Sparrow – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Low Counts:
RUFFED GROUSE: 7 (below 10-year average of 15 and the count high of 77)ROCK PIGEON: only a single flock of 10 (well below the 10-year average of 58 and the count high of 89)
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 40 (well below the 10-year average of 80 and count high of 233)
EUROPEAN STARLING: 10 (below 10-year average of 26 and count high of 114)

Winter Finches:

PURPLE FINCH: 2

RED CROSSBILL: 41

WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL: 8 including singing individuals

PINE SISKIN: 114

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 103

EVENING GROSBEAK: 2

Notable Misses:
SNOW BUNTING: recorded most years (has only been missed 5 times)

Colin Jones, Count Compiler

Male White-winged Crossbill – Wikimedia

Purple Finch (male) – Karl Egressy

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

Dec 262017
 

Barred Owl: Sighted Saturday, December 30, at 2:30pm in Burnham’s Woods (Mark S. Burnham Provincial Park) on Hwy 7, just east of Peterborough. It was sitting in one of the large hemlock trees about 40 metres from the end of the parking lot. I wouldn’t have seen it had it not flown to its perch from another location west of the trail. I was able to watch it from a distance of about 20 metres for about 10 minutes before it flew to another location.  Ross Jamieson

Barred Owl – Michael Gillespie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Algonquin Park Report

Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2017 10:01:48 -0500
From: Ron Tozer <rtozer@vianet.ca>
To: ontbirds <birdalert@ontbirds.ca>
Subject: [Ontbirds] Algonquin Park Birding Report: 28 December 2017
Message-ID: <A7327352-E422-4BC0-8158-F8AE6C174739@vianet.ca>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”UTF-8″

This week’s extremely cold temperatures seemed at odds with evidence of breeding activity by White-winged Crossbills in the Park. A male was observed feeding a female (?courtship feeding?) near the Old Airfield, and three or four males were singing along Spruce Bog Boardwalk, on December 24. Craig Benkman (in The Birds of North America, 1992) reported that this crossbill breeds during three main periods of the year which coincide with maximum availability of conifer seeds. In Algonquin, records indicate breeding in summer and fall (July to November), winter (January to March), and spring (March to June).

Snow depth in the Park now reaches about 25 cm in the open and less under conifers, making it feasible to travel in most areas without snowshoes. As usual, snow on the walking trails has been flattened down with use.

-Wild Turkey: several are coming daily to feed below the Visitor Centre parking lot feeder.

-Ruffed Grouse: sightings continued at the Visitor Centre driveway and feeders.

Spruce Grouse: try Spruce Bog Boardwalk near the trail register box and Opeongo Road north of the winter gate.

Black-backed Woodpecker: one was seen along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 24.

Gray Jay: regular along Opeongo Road from the winter gate northward, and on Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: after several weeks with no reports, one was along Opeongo Road (December 24) and two were at Wolf Howl Pond (December 25).

Winter finches reported this week were: Purple Finch (regular at Visitor Centre feeders), Red Crossbill (small flocks on the highway; and often seen off Visitor Centre deck), White-winged Crossbill (small flocks), Common Redpoll (three along Opeongo Road on December 24 were the first reported since late October), Pine Siskin (fairly numerous), American Goldfinch (fairly numerous) and Evening Grosbeak (about 20 at the Visitor Centre feeders daily). Ron Tozer, Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired), Dwight, ON.


 

Bald Eagles: Sighted Dec 30, 2017 at 7:30am. I had two Bald Eagles perching in a large tree at the waters edge on Rice Lake. A beautiful sight! Esther Ross, north side of Rice Lake, Bailieboro east 

Bald Eagle: Sighted Dec 29, 2017 at 2pm. I just saw a big, beautiful adult Bald Eagle fly north over the farm towards County Road 2.  Michael Gillespie, Fife Line, Keene

Bald Eagle (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gray Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) (1)
– Reported Dec 28, 2017 07:05 by Tyler L. Hoar
– Sandy Lake Pine barrens/Sedge marshes, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “In Black Spruce Bog area east side of largest sedge fen.”

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park – Jan. 2012 – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (12)
– Reported Dec 28, 2017 07:05 by Tyler L. Hoar
– Sandy Lake Pine barrens/Sedge marshes, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.659557,-77.8931522&ll=44.659557,-77.8931522
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41394509
– Comments: “11 of 12 were in White Pine dominated areas, 1 in Eastern Hemlock was actually singing.”

Red Crossbill – Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) (1)
– Reported Dec 28, 2017 09:50 by Colin Jones
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Slowly soared overhead at 12:56 pm”

Juvenile Golden Eagle – USFWS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Dec 28, 2017 09:50 by Colin Jones
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.6201046,-78.1319386&ll=44.6201046,-78.1319386
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41383205

Barred Owl – Jan. 18, 2017 – Michael Gillespie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Dec 28, 2017 07:30 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Petroglyphs CBC Area D, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist:
– Comments: “Flaking bark from dead Red Pine in Petroglyphs Park N of McGinnis lake on E branch. Just S of connecting road.”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (2)
– Reported Dec 28, 2017 08:22 by Colin Jones
– CA-ON-North Kawartha (44.6205,-78.1324), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Red_Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Female), Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (12)
– Reported Dec 28, 2017 09:50 by Colin Jones
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.6201046,-78.1319386&ll=44.6201046,-78.1319386
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41383205
– Comments: “Several small groups”

Lapland Longspur (Calcarius lapponicus) (2)
– Reported Dec 26, 2017 11:00 by Ben Evans
– The Bird’s house, Peterborough, Ontario (in village of Douro)
Map:
Checklist:

Lapland Longspur – Note rufous on wing coverts – Wikimedia

Flock of Lapland Longspurs – Wikimeda

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) (1)
– Reported Dec 26, 2017 09:00 by Martin Parker
– Peterborough – 1494 Westbrook Drive, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3048253,-78.3463812&ll=44.3048253,-78.3463812
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41335870
– Comments: “continuing individual”

Common Grackle – from The Crossley ID Guide to Eastern Birds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snow Buntings: Today, Dec. 26, at noon. My first winter birds! A “squall” of Snow Buntings – at least 30 – flying over Hwy 28, just south of County Road 6 (Lakefield), to a field on the west side. Quite the sight!   Marilyn Freeman

Snow Buntings – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl: On December 24, 09:50, I saw a Snowy Owl (probably a male) northeast of Lindsay. It was on a hydro pole along Highway 36, about half-way along the north-south stretch from Cheese Factory to the bend before Snug Harbour Road.  Alan Crook

Snowy Owl (Nima Taghaboni)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rough-legged Hawk: Despite the deteriorating mound of the deer carcass in the orchard, it did attract a Rough-legged Hawk this morning, December 24. Michael Gillespie, David Fife Line, Keene

Rough-legged Hawk (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker: On Nov 18, I reported a Red-bellied Woodpecker female and saw another female today, Dec 24, on the north shore of Buckhorn Lake at Kawartha Hideaway. It was poking under the bark of an old maple tree. Jane Philpott

Red-bellied Woodpecker (female) – Jennifer MacKenzie Dec 31, 2014

Aug 072017
 

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) (5)
– Reported Jul 31, 2017 10:00 by Rick Lauzon
– Bellmere Winds G.C., Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “very easy to see both adults and juveniles all around the golf course, looking from the parking lot, and up and down the road beside the course on the hydro poles. There are certainly more than 5 birds on this property. I reported these birds at the end of June as well, but the report was apparently never confirmed by the ebird reviewer.”

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) (3)
– Reported Aug 01, 2017 10:32 by Drew Monkman
– Northey Bay, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Two adults and one juvenile seen by Dennis Johnson on his property. ”

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) On July 26, Marina Kosicheck of 1635 Cedar Valley Road, Fraserville, ON, reported a Red-headed Woodpecker that had been frequenting her black sunflower seed feeder since July 19. It was still present on August 8.

Gray Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) (1)
– Reported Aug 07, 2017 12:06 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “on trail from parking lot to visitor centre”

Sora (Porzana carolina) (2)
– Reported Aug 05, 2017 07:38 by Peterborough County Birds Database
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Gray Jays – Nov. 17, 2016 – County Road 507 north of Buckhorn – Marie Windover

Sora (rail) – Wikimeda

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker – Northey Bay Road – Dennis Johnson – Aug. 6, 2017

Juvenile and adult Red-headed Woodpecker – Northey Bay Road – Dennis Johnson – Aug. 6, 2017

 

 

Feb 162017
 

I had a Barred Owl show up the morning of February 12. It hung around for about 20 minutes before the Blue Jays started squawking at it. It sat there and watched the snowmobiles fly by on the nearby trail that runs up the side of the 507. It was snowing quite hard. The Gray Jays are still coming around almost every day!

Marie Windover, Flynn’s Corners

Northern Barred Owl – Tim Dyson – NBR 051214 -2

Dec 182016
 

I greatly enjoyed your article (Dec. 15) about the Gray Jay. I also had a very pleasant and memorable encounter with this intelligent and lovable bird. In 1971 we took our children and those of our neighbours in Ottawa on our annual hike to High Falls near Petroglyphs Provincial Park. Half way up the trail, we decided to have our elaborate picnic lunch on a nice piece of greenery under shady trees. There, we spread out on two blankets, our goodies, sandwiches, cakes, etc. Before commencing to eat, we all laid back and enjoyed the bird songs and the nature around us. All of a sudden a grey bird swooshed out of a tree branch above us and grabbed a sandwich and took off. We were amazed by this bird and enjoyed the spectacle as he or she gradually cleaned out our picnic lunch. It was a great show and a memory which stuck with me forever.

Peter Adamek, Peterborough

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park - March 2014

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

 

 

Dec 152016
 

Most readers are probably now aware that the Royal Canadian Geographical Society has chosen the gray jay as Canada’s national bird. It beat out better-known contenders like the common loon and snowy owl in a countrywide vote, followed by a panel debate. Personally, I think the gray jay fits the bill from every perspective. If you have ever “met” one, you will understand how easy it is to fall in love with these tame, gentle birds. And, if you were looking for a bird that represents our great northern forests and the tenacity of life in the dead of winter, this is the species.

Only slightly smaller than its blue-feathered cousin, the gray jay is a study in black, white and grey. It has a soft, almost rounded appearance, thanks to its short bill, large eyes and fluffy plumage. The gray jay’s silent, gliding flight and soft melodious call notes project this same aura of softness. You can almost think of it as an inflated chickadee – and equally friendly! Some would also argue that the gray jay’s lack of flamboyance is a good match with the nature of Canadians.

Gray Jay eating from my hand on Spruce Bog Trail - Algonquin Park - January 2012

Gray Jay eating from my hand on Spruce Bog Trail – Algonquin Park – January 2012

Behaviour

Gray jays – or Canada jays as they were once called – are both tame and venturesome, two characteristics that endear them to people. They seem to have an instinctive sense that humans are an easy source of food. They are well known for visiting hunt camps, traplines, nordic ski trails and backcountry campsites. They will take just about any edible scrap. Gray jays often shared meals with the men and women who built our nation – explorers, prospectors, lumberjacks, north country settlers – and no doubt eased their loneliness. They are also known as “camp-robbers” and “whiskey jacks”. The latter name was derived from “wiskedjak”, an Ojibwa word meaning a mischievous spirit who liked to play tricks on people. Choosing the gray jay as Canada’s national bird honours our First Nations. Gray jays are permanent residents. They do not migrate – not even for short distances. Mated pairs occupy a territory of about 70 hectares, which they sometimes share with a third, non-breeding individual. Staying put may partly explain why they are so long-lived – up to 16 years.

Gray jays have evolved to store food as an adaptation to surviving the winter months. Food items are saturated with sticky saliva from the bird’s enlarged salivary glands. The saliva coagulates on contact with air and becomes a viscous glue, which is used to cement the food to nooks and crannies in trees. They guard against thievery from other species by covering their food caches with a piece of bark or lichen. Gray jays can make hundreds of caches in a single day, especially in late summer and early fall when food is plentiful. This will provide nearly all of the nutrition they need from November through May. What is most astonishing, however, is that the birds actually remember where they have hidden their food! Maybe this isn’t so surprising, since gray jays belong to the Corvid (crow) family, arguably the smartest birds on the planet. The jay’s habit of putting away resources for future needs is an important lesson to all Canadians, especially at this time of record personal debt.

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park - Jan. 2012 - Drew Monkman

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park – Jan. 2012 – Drew Monkman

Nesting

Gray jays begin nesting in early March, when sub-zero temperatures and heavy snow cover rein supreme. One reason the young are able to survive the cold is superb nest construction. Unlike the blue jays’ flimsy nests, those of the gray jay are bulky, deep and well insulated. They are lined with feathers and even bits of fur. The three or four nestlings are fed food that the parents cached the previous year. By nesting early, the young get a head start on amassing the food stores they will need to get through their first winter.

Juvenile gray jays are a sooty grey all over and almost look like they belong to a different species. In June, they begin a serious struggle for dominance. The young jays chase each other more and more aggressively until one of them will have expelled its siblings from the parents’ territory. This more dominant bird will continue to live with its parents for two or three years, or until a nearby territory becomes available. This is why you often see gray jays in groups of three. Sometimes, however, the third bird is an “ejectee” from another territory that is now living with unrelated adults. The weaker siblings are forced to leave the territory and most will die before winter arrives. This strange behaviour on the part of young jays makes evolutionary sense. They are probably not skilled enough to store sufficient food for their first-winter needs and have to rely on help from adult birds. It is unlikely, however, that there would  be sufficient food for a second or third juvenile, hence the fight for dominance.

Range

Gray jays are found from coast to coast in Canada and in all of our provinces and territories. In Ontario, their range extends from the edge of the tree line in the north to the last isolated spruce bogs where the Canadian Shield meets the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Lowlands in the “Land Between”.

However, you won’t find  gray jays in our towns and cities. This might make you wonder why we would  want a national bird that so few of us can easily observe first-hand? David Bird, Emeritus Professor of Ornithology at McGill University, argues that this very fact might motivate more Canadians to visit the northern forests to see their national bird and learn more about its increasingly threatened habitat.

Gray jays can still be found in the northern Kawarthas, although their numbers are decreasing. Up until about 15 years ago, at least one pair had a territory at the Kawartha Nordic Ski Club north of Woodview. Skiers would enjoy sharing a few bread crusts or sunflower seeds with the birds at the Tanney Cabin. They were also present in Petroglyphs Provincial Park and in the Apsley area. In “Our Heritage of Birds” (1983), Doug Sadler wrote, “In winter, gray jays…have been found even in the southern parts (of Peterborough County) as early as September and as late as April (Miller Creek Conservation Area). They sometimes visit feeders.” The birds Sadler describes were probably immature jays, which had been forced out of their parents’ breeding territory.

There is still a pair of gray jays coming to a feeder on County Road 507, north of Flynn’s Corners. There are also occasional sightings from the large bog on Jack’s Lake Road south of Apsley and even scattered reports from Petroglyphs Provincial Park. Whether there is still a breeding pair at these locations is unclear, however. Just this week, I also learned of a lone gray jay spotted on Algonquin Boulevard in Peterborough.

Gray Jays - Nov. 17, 2016 - County Road 507 - Marie Windover

Gray Jays – Nov. 17, 2016 – County Road 507 – Marie Windover

Your best chance of seeing and feeding gray jays, however, usually requires a trip to Algonquin Park. Late fall and winter is an excellent time to find them on Opeongo Road, at the top end of the Mizzy Lake Trail and on the Spruce Bog Trail between the parking lot and the boardwalk. If you hold out food, they will glide down from a tree and land on your bare hand. The sensation of the bird’s talons on your skin and the close-up view of their fluffy plumage and big black eyes are unforgettable.

You will also be able to witness their caching behaviour. When you share food with  jays, they hardly eat any of it. Instead, they continually fly back into the forest and conceal each tidbit. Your handouts are being transformed into survival insurance. How can you not be impressed!

Climate change

Even in Algonquin Park, gray jay populations have suffered a marked decline in recent decades. The population is only half of what it was in the 1970s. It may be that a warming climate is speeding up the decomposition rate of perishable food caches like insects and pieces of meat. In other words, the birds’ natural refrigerator is failing. This, in turn, may be making winter survival and successful nesting more difficult.

Gray Jay on nest in late winter - Dan Strickland

Gray Jay on nest in late winter – Dan Strickland

This hypothesis comes from  a decades-long study of gray jays in Algonquin Park by Dan Strickland, a former head naturalist. Annual air temperature in the park has been increasing by about 0.7 degrees Fahrenheit per decade. Habitat that once supported breeding jays, including many areas along Highway 60, is now abandoned. The worst losses have been in areas dominated by hardwood forests, while the least attrition has occurred in boggy, lowland areas covered with spruce. It is thought that the antibacterial properties of spruce bark and resin may help preserve cached food.

Despite – or maybe because of – the many challenges the gray jay faces, I am delighted with its choice as our national bird. Although the loon, snowy owl and chickadee would have also fit the bill, the gray jay is something fresh and new and just might encourage people to get outside and to explore the north – if only Algonquin Park. For that reason alone, you have to like the selection. And, just in case you are a stickler for Canadian spelling, please note that the bird’s official name is indeed gray jay and not “grey jay”!

 

 

 

Nov 172016
 

I heard that the Gray Jay is going to be Canada’s national bird. So, in honor of the designation, I photographed these two today in my yard today

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park - March 2014

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

and fed them bacon as a Canadian gesture!

Marie Windover, 2167 Cty Rd 507, Flynn’s Corners

Gray Jays - Nov. 17, 2016 - County Road 507 - Marie Windover

Gray Jays – Nov. 17, 2016 – County Road 507 – Marie Windover

Dec 072015
 

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) (1)
– Reported Dec 03, 2015 13:42 by Martyn Obbard
– Buckhorn Rd. ca. 500 m south of Buckhorn, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “large raptor soaring overhead; at first thought TUVU; larger than TUVU; long broad wings, slow wing beat, extensive “fingering” of primaries, all dark underneath, no contrasting pattern. no white underneath”

Gray Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) (3)
– Reported Dec 06, 2015 09:08 by Iain Rayner
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
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– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Three birds came in to pishing well north of McGinnis Lake just S of the main Parking lot.”

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park - March 2014

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

Golden Eagle (3rd winter bird) Tim Dyson

Golden Eagle (3rd winter bird) Tim Dyson

Dec 022015
 

Gray Jay (Northern) (Perisoreus canadensis) (2)
– Reported Nov 28, 2015 08:45 by Wendy Hogan
– Rockcroft, Peterborough, Ontario
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– Comments: “Two birds swooping down onto highway to pick at a red squirrel.”

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park - March 2014

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

Jan 242015
 
Gray Jays - 2167 Cty Rd 507 - Dec. 14 2014

Gray Jays – 2167 Cty Rd 507 – Dec. 14 2014 Marie Windover

For the past five years, Gray Jays have been coming regularly to a feeder at house number 2167 on County Road 507, about 3 km north of Flynn’s Corners (north of Buckhorn.) Until recently there were three birds; however, now there are only two.

Marie Windover, 2167 County Road 507

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park - Jan. 2012  - Drew Monkman

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park – Jan. 2012 – Drew Monkman

Dec 282014
 

Gray Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) (1)
– Reported Dec 27, 2014 05:54 by Donald Sutherland
– Petroglyphs CBC–Area F, Peterborough, Ontario
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– Comments: “perched atop spruce spire in ‘Jack Lake Bog’ on E side Jack Road around 3 km SSE of Apsley. Observed for several minutes around 13:30 h before it dropped out of sight.

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park - March 2014

Gray Jay -Tom Northey – Algonquin Park – March 2014