Aug 052016
 

I finally saw my first Giant Swallowtail of 2016 on July 26th, just north of Norwood. Good to see others have been seeing them as well. I was beginning to think that they were vanishing about as suddenly as they first appeared in the Kawarthas, back in 2011 or thereabouts.

Tim Dyson

Note: I had a Giant Swallowtail in my garden in Peterborough on August 4 and one at the Riverside Zoo. D.M.

Giant Swallowtail on phlox - Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail on phlox – Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail 5th instar caterpillar - Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail 5th instar caterpillar – Tim Dyson

Aug 052016
 

I read the sightings of Giant Swallowtails in the area…then yesterday, in the marsh at camp, I too spotted a Giant Swallowtail! First time for me as well. Exciting! Last week at camp a family of American Mink hid under my boat. There was one adult and seven pups! They have been spotted many times as they are romping around during daylight hours.

Barb Evett, Lakehurst

Giant Swallowtail - David Beaucage Johnson - Aug. 1, 2016

Giant Swallowtail – David Beaucage Johnson – Aug. 1, 2016

American Mink - Tim Corner

American Mink – Tim Corner

Aug 022016
 

I got a picture of this Giant Swallowtail butterfly today (August 1, 2016)), a species I had never seen before. So again, something unusual has popped up at Curve Lake!  I did some reading and these butterflies are moving northward. Reports thus far say that they are now found at Point Pelee and the northernmost report is from Ottawa.

David Beaucage Johnson

Note: Giant Swallowtails are a newcomer to the Kawarthas, too, and now appear to be well established. D.M.

Giant Swallowtail - David Beaucage Johnson - Aug. 1, 2016

Giant Swallowtail at Curve Lake – David Beaucage Johnson – Aug. 1, 2016

Jul 292016
 

I saw my first Giant Swallowtail of the year in the garden today, hovering around the phlox. I checked the dill plantation but there were no larvae. No Monarchs have been seen.

Bill Snowden, Ennismore

Note: I saw my first Giant Swallowtail today, too, just east of Havelock.  Giant Swallowtails in the Kawarthas lay their eggs on Hoptree and Prickly Ash.  D.M.

Giant Swallowtail on phlox - Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail on phlox – Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail on phlox - August 18, 2014 - Drew Monkman

Giant Swallowtail on phlox – August 18, 2014 – Drew Monkman

 

Jul 162016
 

I have not seen a Giant Swallowtail this year at all. Although I haven’t kept count of Monarchs this year, I did see my first one  on May 29th – my earliest ever – and my second on June 2nd.  The first was near Warsaw, and the other, near Stoney Lake. I’ve been back to photographing moths again. I find it an interesting thing to do in different and diverse habitats. There is much diversity of species from down off the shield between the Warsaw/Lakefield farmland, to the oak/pine belt just on the Shield around the north side of Stoney Lake. I’ve seen a few new species (new
to me) this year, and some regarded as “rare or uncommon” by Covell in his “Moths of Eastern North America”.

Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail on phlox - Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail on phlox – Tim Dyson

 

Jun 012015
 

On May 30th, on my way to Stoney Lake, I saw my first Giant Swallowtail of the season as it flew across the road in front of me on County Rd #46 between Round Lake Rd, and Church Rd north of Havelock. Seems to be right on time for first flight of Giants, based on observations of the past few years since they became suddenly abundant in the county.
Upon arrival at Stoney, the client I was going to see about some gardening told me she had just seen her first two Monarchs of the season, the day before (May 29th) – one at her home in Toronto, and the other at her island cottage on Stoney Lake. Seemed a little early to me based on my own observations of the species, but I have no reason to doubt her. It may have slipped my mind to report these, but the fine article recently posted here by Chip Taylor about Monarch status/predictions reminded me.

Monarch Butterfly - Terry Carpenter

Monarch Butterfly – Terry Carpenter

Giant Swallowtail on phlox - Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail on phlox – Tim Dyson

Sep 042014
 

When I left the house yesterday, (September 3rd), and headed out to work near Norwood and then on to Stoney Lake later, I had seen a total of 59 Monarchs during this 2014 season. When I returned home at dusk last night, that total had grown to 83, (including 7 observed as road kills). This total may well triple the number that I observed for the entire 2013 season, (which was 32 monarchs.)

So, as of yesterday, my expected estimate of 60 that I had predicted seeing this season was wrong, but I am happy to say that is was wrong on the PLUS side of things!! Now, 100 or more should not be out of the question, as there are still some weeks of monarch season to go.

I plan to film some of the raptor migration in the coming weeks, both inland, and along Lake Ontario, so Monarch sightings will surely jump during those times. In fact, in the past, the most monarchs I have seen in a single day have been while watching the autumn hawk movement. Cold front coming Friday night after hot, muggy and then thunderstorms, so Saturday should be fantastic for hawk watching, (and counting more Monarchs). I will keep you posted.

I still have my eye out for second brood Giant Swallowtails, but am still at 19, and have not seen one for nearly a week now.

Tim Dyson

Male Monarch

Male Monarch

Aug 262014
 
White Admiral - Margot Hughes

White Admiral – Margot Hughes

Today, we had two Monarchs visit the Buddleia in our garden. Over the past week, we’ve had a single Monarch come to the garden most days. Yesterday, there were also a Giant Swallowtail (second of the year), a White Admiral and a Red Admiral. The admirals were on the Buddleia, while the swallowtail preferred the phlox.

Blair Hamilton of Pigeon Lake also had a Giant Swallowtail in his yard today. It was laying eggs on his Hop Tree.

Drew Monkman

Giant Swallowtail on phlox - August 18, 2014 - Drew Monkman

Giant Swallowtail on phlox – August 18, 2014 – Drew Monkman

Aug 202014
 

We finally had a Monarch show up in our garden on August 17.  As of today, local naturalist Tim Dyson has counted a total of 46 Monarchs so far this summer. Tony Bigg, another inveterate butterfly watcher, was up to 61 Monarchs as of this week. He had 14 all of last year!  Tony has seen a total of 83 species of butterflies in Peterborough County so far this year.

On August 18, a Giant Swallowtail also made an appearance in our garden. According to Tim Dyson, this is the second flight (second generation) of Giant Swallowtails. So far, he has seen 11 of these second generation swallowtails.

Drew Monkman

Giant Swallowtail on phlox - August 18, 2014 - Drew Monkman

Giant Swallowtail on phlox – August 18, 2014 – Drew Monkman

Jul 272014
 

Between June 2nd and June 12th, I saw 44 Giant Swallowtails between Cordova Mines, Marmora, Campbellford, Havelock, Norwood, and Stoney Lake. Very brief first flight this year, and started quite late, as often (2013 anyway), I will see them fairly regularly during the third and fourth week of May, and then ending in early June. Have not looked for larvae as yet, but will soon. Have now seen 31 Monarchs this year, which is only one short of the 32 I saw during all of the 2013 season, (and most of those were from the later brood that heads to Mexico). So, not tonnes of them, I know, but the season is still so early, I expect to see perhaps 60 or more this year.    Tim Dyson

On June 17th I had one Giant Swallowtail in my garden and one on the TCT between Nelson Line and David Fife Line. On June 19th I had two in my garden. Jerry also had one but I am not sure where. These are the only ones I have heard of. As of yesterday I am up to 82 species for the county this year. One more, the Leonard’s Skipper, will be out in mid-August.  Tony Bigg

Giant Swallowtail on phlox - Tim Dyson

Giant Swallowtail on phlox – Tim Dyson

Monarch Butterfly - Terry Carpenter

Monarch Butterfly – Terry Carpenter

 

 

Nov 212013
 
Giant Swallowtail in my garden on Sept. 8, 2013 (Drew Monkman)

Giant Swallowtail in my garden on Sept. 8, 2013 (Drew Monkman)

I ended up seeing a whopping 32 Monarchs this season, after all. In addition, I made a list of all the Giant Swallowtails (87!)  I saw – including a few that were observed as roadkills – from August 20th to September 10th or thereabouts. They were all during the second brood and spanned about three weeks.

Tim Dyson, Stoney Lake