Dec 162016
 

The Northern Flicker was back on December 6 trying to find space in the crab-apple tree with the 2 dozen American Robins that were there. On December 5, the Cooper’s Hawk returned, flushing out a dozen Mourning Doves from the spruce.  Early Monday morning I was entertained by a young squirrel that I guess was experiencing a decent amount of snow for the first time. I watched it come down the truck of a tree, jump into the snow and instantly jump back up on to the trunk of the tree. It jumped into the snow and back on the tree repeatedly and was also running around the tree and pouncing on the snow. It was acting just like a puppy or kitten. Very amusing!

Sue Paradisis, Tudor Crescent

Northern Flicker and American Robin -Sue-Paradisis

Northern Flicker and American Robin -Sue Paradisis

Cooper's Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Cooper’s Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Nov 202016
 
Cooper's Hawk on Rock Pigeon 2 - Helen Nicolaides Keller

Cooper’s Hawk on Rock Pigeon 2 – Helen Nicolaides Keller

On Friday afternoon, November 11, this beautiful adult Cooper’s Hawk made a kill in my east city backyard. It appeared to have taken a Rock Pigeon.

Helen Nicolaides Keller, Mark Street

Cooper's Hawk on Rock Pigeon - Helen Nicolaides Keller

Cooper’s Hawk on Rock Pigeon – Helen Nicolaides Keller

Nov 202016
 

I thought you might be interested in the following: a Gray Squirrel and a Cooper’s Hawk dueled it out on the top rail of our split rail fence in mid-October. For at least 15 minutes they charged at each other fearlessly before the hawk called it quits. (When the hawk took the initiative the squirrel retreated to a lower rail.)
Burke Doran

Cooper's Hawk - Nancy Cafik

Cooper’s Hawk – Nancy Cafik

Jul 292016
 
Cardinal Flower - August 3, 2016 - Big Gull Lake - Elaine Monkman

Cardinal Flower – August 3, 2016 – Big Gull Lake – Elaine Monkman

Here are some sightings of interest from this past week (July 25 – 31, 2016)) at my brother’s cottage on Big Gull Lake, south of Bon Echo Provincial Park.

  1. Family group of Cooper’s Hawks. Two or three very vocal juveniles, “whistling” loudly. As big as adults.
  2. A covey of 8 Ruffed Grouse, almost adult size.
  3. A Hummingbird Clearwing Moth on the petunias at the dock.
  4. A “convocation” of five, non-breeding Common Loons on the lake.
  5. A larval Blue-spotted Salamander, which was still showing gills behind the head. Was in a backwater section of shoreline, protected from waves by a large fallen log.
  6. Several Dragonhunter dragonflies.
  7. Numerous Red-eyed Vireos (probably young ones) on cottage property.
  8. Two Ruby-throated Hummingbirds at nectar feeder.
  9. Cardinal flowers in bloom along shoreline.
  10. Bird song: Hermit Thrush, Red-eyed Vireo, Pine Warbler

Drew Monkman

juvenile Cooper's Hawk - Linda Easton

juvenile Cooper’s Hawk – Linda Easton

Jan 022016
 

This morning was very busy in my yard with my regular leucistic robin, 3 blue jays, a pair of cardinals, doves, chickadees, a white breasted nuthatch and goldfinches all feeding at the same time. I thought all of them had left when the Cooper’s hawk flew into the top of the ash tree at the back of my yard. It sat there for quite some time before I noticed the female cardinal was still in the crab apple tree. She was very aware that the hawk was there and stayed perfectly still in spite of the squirrels going into the tree to feed just a couple of feet away from her. This went on for over 1/2 an hour with neither bird  moving. I kept hoping the pigeons would arrive so she might get away. Finally I intervened. I know the hawk needs to eat but not the only cardinal that comes to my yard! I went out and walked out to the back and took a picture of the hawk before it flew off. Seconds later the cardinal was gone in a flash.

Cooper's Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Cooper’s Hawk on prey  (Karl Egressy)

The leucistic robin (showing patches of white due to abnormal pigmentation) I mentioned has been here for months. It spends most of the day in the shelter of the big spruce beside the crab apple tree. Every so often it comes out of the spruce, eats a few crab apples or comes to the deck for water and then goes back into the spruce. Two days ago, a flock of at least 8 robins flew into the crab apple and started to feed. The leucistic bird came out and vigorously defended its food source. Within minutes the other robins left and it went back to the spruce. Shortly after the Cooper’s hawk came by and chased off 4 pigeons.

I also have a squirrel with a white tail end and a leucistic mourning dove with a white tail.

Sue Paradisis, Tudor Crescent, Peterborough

Leucistic American Robin (Alan Dextrase - April 12, 2013)

Leucistic American Robin (Alan Dextrase – April 12, 2013)

Dec 292014
 

We looked randomly out the window into our yard yesterday (Dec.28th) only to observe a hawk sitting on top of a pile of white feathers! We stood and watched until it flew away with the remainder of its prey. On further inspection the only things remaining on the ground were feathers and a leg. We weren’t quick enough with the camera, so really have no idea what kind of hawk it may have been. The location is Ridgewood Rd. (Woodglade & Sherbrooke).
Perhaps 3 feeders are 2 too many?

Wendy Marrs

Note: The populations of birds that frequent backyard feeders are all quite healthy, so I wouldn’t stop feeding just because the odd individual falls prey to a hawk. D.M.

Cooper's Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Cooper’s Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Aug 212014
 

This picture of a juvenile Cooper’s Hawk was taken on August 2nd at my home near Kerry Line and Pigeon Lake about noon.

Linda Easton

juvenile Cooper's Hawk - Linda Easton

juvenile Cooper’s Hawk – Linda Easton

Note from Tim Dyson, a local raptor expert, who made the identification:

Interesting in Linda`s photo of the Cooper`s, is that it shows an “August” eye colour. They leave the nest and disperse as youngsters throughout the summer, and all the while, most have greenish/gray eyes during this brief period of their lives. In the coming months however, those eyes will become bright yellow. A year from now, most males (and some females) will be showing signs of the eyes turning towards pale orange. After two years of age, males will have either deep orange, or even red eyes. Females take much longer to go through the eye colour change, and some, may not ever even reach the blood-red eyes that the older males have. Interestingly though, males are not sexually mature until their third year, whereas females, they can pair, breed, and raise young after only one year of age. It is common (for accipiters, as well as Red-shouldered, and Broad-winged Hawks), to visit a nest in the spring, and find one completely adult male, with an incubating mate that is still in full immature plumage.

Jan 242010
 

I just had another visit from a Cooper’s Hawk. It comes regularly in early winter and early spring but this is the first time I have spotted it in January.

Location: 1338 Tudor Crescent, Peterborough
Observer: Sue Paradisis