Jan 042019
 

Large congregation of eagles in Campbellford – This morning, January 29, at Percy Reach on the Trent River south of Campbellford, there were 13 Bald Eagles waiting their turn, while 3 Eastern Coyotes ate deer on the ice. The coyotes have killed three deer in the last two weeks here. Nice watching all of this happening just 700 metres behind my house.  Donald Munro

Bald Eagle on deer carcass on Woodland Drive – Peterborough – February 15, 2014 – Val Roberts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Redpolls in Campbellford – Here are some pictures of Common Redpolls taken January 26 and 29 in Campbellford. The flock of 250 or so birds was found on Dart Road. Donald Munro

Common Redpolls feeding – January 26, 2019 – Donald Munro

 

Common Redpolls in flight – January 26, 2019 – Donald Munro

Part of flock of 250 Common Redpolls – Campbellford – Jan. 29, 2019 – Donald Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eagles and otter at Young’s Point – Today, January 24, I saw three immature (first-year?) Bald Eagles on the ice at Young’s Point. They were on the Katchewanooka side of the bridge where there is a long stretch of open water.There was also a River Otter, a large number of Common Goldeneye ducks, several Common Mergansers, and three Trumpeter Swans. Barb Craig, Young’s Point

Two immature Bald Eagles (3rd winter bird on left and 2nd winter bird on right) – Tim Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strange fish and tadpole sighting – We have a large swamp near our house on the north shore of Stony Lake. There is a small area that never freezes – probably spring fed. Today, January 19, there was a swarming mass of dozens of 2-inch tadpoles and many 1-inch fish covering the whole area (about 2 sq. ft.) They seemed dead or barely alive. I’m not sure what the explanation might be. Maybe you or some of your readers may have some insights?  Ed Duncan, Northey’s Bay Road

Tadpoles (probably Green Frog) – Ed Duncan – January 19, 2019 – Northey’s Bay

Swarming mass of tadpoles and fish – Ed Duncan – January 19, 2019 – Northey’s Bay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagle near Norwood: Today, January 21, we saw a Bald Eagle just outside of Norwood. We were driving down our road and there was a large flock of crows on the road, in the air and perched in the trees. We were looking at them and talking about them when we realized that there was an eagle sitting in the tree at the edge of the field. Amazing! I have never seen one before.
Two or three weeks ago, we saw a hawk sitting in a tree. It was different from the red-tailed Hawks that we usually see. I was telling my neighbour about it and she said that it was an eagle. I don’t know the difference between a hawk and an eagle. Last week, she called me one afternoon and said to look out the window because there was 3 eagles flying over our yards. They just glided back and forth, heading slowly south towards Hastings, until I could no longer see them. Again, I don’t know if they were hawks or eagles, just taking her word for it. But today, this was definitely a bald eagle, and I am still excited about it.  Susan Hie, Norwood

Bald Eagle – Jan. 14 2014 Woodland Drive in Peterborough – by Bill Astell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks: I’m getting grosbeaks at my feeder daily for safflower seed. I bought a great metal hanging tray feeder at Village Pet Foods in Lakefield that they love. I’ll get upwards of six ringing the edge. I’d say I get a flock of 20 or so two or three times a day. Northern Cardinals are spotted once in a rare while. A few times a month is all. Too many Blue Jays to count. I also buy 50 pound bags of in shell peanuts once again at Village Pet Foods for my grey and red squirrels. I also got some close up shots of two flying squirrels at one of my hanging tube feeders filled with black oil on Christmas eve. It made my night. They were very curious and not afraid in the least.  Mark Leslie, Centre Dummer

Flying squirrels – Mike Barker – Sandy Lake – Jan. 12, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Flicker at feeders – A flicker has been a regular at our feeder for the last few weeks. It has been eating the black oil sunflower seed. We back onto Harper Park. Phil McKeating, Creekwood Drive 

We had a flicker at our feeder on Conger Street in Peterborough in early January. Marie Duchesneau 

Northern Flicker – January 1, 2016 – Mark St. Peterborough – Helen & Larry Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trumpeter Swans on Otonabee River – On Friday afternoon, Jan. 18, around 4:45 PM, I drove south from work in Lakefield along River Road and came across these three Trumpeter Swans. One looks like a juvenile. I felt very fortunate, they certainly are not a common sight. They were just north of Lock 25 on the Otonabee River.  Don Koppin

Trumpeter Swans – Jan. 19, 19 – Otonabee River – Don Koppin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hermit Thrush at Curve Lake FN – I took this photo of a Hermit Thrush on January 19. It was feeding on Staghorn Sumac behind my house at Curve Lake First Nation. It is sometimes on the ground, in the branches of the spruce tree beside our house and in the sumac around the back woodshed. Feel free to let interested birders know. We are at the end of a long driveway. The thrush was still here as of January 20. Dave Johnson, 1010 Mississauga St, Curve Lake First Nation 

Hermit Thrush – January 19, 2019 – Curve Lake FN – Dave Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagles on Belmont Lake – I have a cottage on Belmont lake. We have been delighted to see soaring high above the lake a pair of Bald Eagles. For two years they have stayed close to the middle and northern sections of the lake, mostly fishing and being quite successful. I am sending you my two best shots taken from our boat, as we tried to follow yet keep a distance to not scare them away. I am also in contact with Tim Dyson, who tells me he spent several years near our lake, and spotted Bald Eagles in the winter months as well.  I have also sent the information to the MNR/NHIC to update their maps.  Julia Matys, Belmont Lake

Bald Eagle – Belmont Lake – summer 2018 – Julia Matys

Bald Eagle – Belmont Lake – summer 2017 – Julia Matys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks – As of January 4, we have had a nice flock of about 24 Evening Grosbeaks hanging around our back field and feeder. One appears to be without pigment (leucistic). They really love the sumac grove on the edge of the field. We have not had Evening Grosbeaks in our area before.           Gene de St. Croix, Sixth Line, Hastings 

Evening Grosbeaks. Note leucistic bird third from left – Gene de St. Croix

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagles and Trumpeter Swans – We live on Katchewanooka Lake and in the past two days (January 9-10) I’ve seen both mature and immature Bald Eagles – three times! Each time, the bird was perched off of the ice at our shoreline. I thought perhaps the immature Bald Eagle was actually a Golden Eagle, due to its colour and size, but since we have a family of Bald Eagles nesting on one of the islands nearby, I trust that these were all Bald Eagles. We’re very lucky and tend to see them fairly often this time of year! Eagles are one of my favourite birds, such big, beautiful creatures. I’ll try to be quicker with my camera next time and will hopefully snap a photo! I also saw 5 Trumpeter Swans two days ago – 2 adults and 3 immatures. I had never seen immatures here before! They meandered by our shoreline and then headed towards the group of birds off of a nearby island. Melissa Nagy, Katchewanooka Lake

Trumpeter Swans on Katchewanooka Lake in January 2019 – Melissa Nagy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks – On January 10-11, I had a dozen Pine Grosbeaks eating crabapples on the ground beneath the tree. Sue Paradisis, Peterborough

Pine Grosbeaks – January 10, 2019 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooper’s Hawk – On Nov 18, 2018, a flock of local Rock Pigeons was raiding our backyard feeder when a Cooper’s Hawk flew in at lightening speed. The frightened pigeons took off suddenly to escape, but one of them turned into a cloud of feathers and fell to the ground. The hawk came in so fast that I failed to see it until, in an instant, it was on the ground with the dying pigeon. It sat there for a few minutes, which allowed me to take pictures and watch it before it eventually flew off with the pigeon to a nearby tree to enjoy its warm meal.  Ed Lukaszewicz, Peterborough

Cooper’s Hawk on freshly-killed Rock Pigeon – Nov. 18, 2018 – Peterborough – Ed Lukaszewicz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) (1)
– Reported Jan 08, 2019 12:54 by C Douglas
– Rice Lake–Birdsalls Wharf, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Swan seen swimming in open water east of landing. Had black face pattern and orange coloured bill. Photo taken”

Mute Swan (photo: Drew Monkman)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Jan 08, 2019 11:57 by C Douglas
– Rice Lake–Hiawatha (Herkimer Point), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Large white bird on ice. Seen through scope ”

Snowy Owl in flight – Wendy Leszkowicz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1) CONFIRMED
– Reported Jan 05, 2019 07:25 by Colin Jones
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “On the trail to the Bennett Cabin. Photos taken.”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) (2) CONFIRMED
– Reported Jan 05, 2019 07:25 by Colin Jones
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “At W end of PL Road at a location where I’ve seen Canada Jay in the past”

Canada (Gray) Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coyotes & Cooper’s Hawk – We had lots of Coyote activity last night (January 2). The pack went right through our back yard again – lots of communication going on. From the tracks in the snow it would appear to be about 5 or 6 animals. This morning we have a Cooper’s Hawk on the ground about 20 feet back into the bush on the PGCC golf course property having his breakfast. The Gray Squirrel is very interested in what is going on and has been within 5 ft of the hawk!  Jim Watt, Franmor Drive

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
– Reported Jan 03, 2019 16:25 by Scott Gibson
– Peterborough–Little Lake, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “female/imm type bird SW shore (cemetery side) across from Beavermead beach. Viewed from cemetary. Merganser with thin bill, gradual transition b/w breast and throat.”

Female Red-breasted Merganser (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooper’s Hawk: Yesterday, I found the kill site of a Rock Pigeon at the side of my house. Although I hadn’t seen a Coopers Hawk for weeks, I figured it was still around, judging by how few birds had been coming to my feeders. Today, the hawk showed up and was around for hours. The squirrels were not impressed and a couple of them spent a lot of time harassing it to leave. Even a little Red Squirrel did a lot of scolding just 10 feet away. At some point in the morning when I wasn’t watching, it caught a pigeon and perched up in a spruce to eat. The squirrel chased it off so I now have a half eaten carcass decorating my tree.  Sue Paradisis, Tudor Cr., Peterborough

Cooper’s Hawk eating Mourning Dove – January 2018 – Sue Paradisis

 

Dec 152018
 

Cooper’s Hawk: I had a Cooper’s Hawk visiting the neighborhood for a couple of days in the last week of December. Also had a pile of grey feathers (likely a Mourning Dove) in the garden near our feeder at this time. I managed to get a reasonable photo when it was here (Dec. 29th). Thought you might be interested.   Evan Thomas, Sandalwood Drive, Peterborough

Cooper’s Hawk – January 2019 – Evan Thomas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Eastern Coyote Reports: Someone in our area (Peterborough Golf and Country Club) is reporting sightings of coyotes just about every day. On December 22, one was walking down the middle of Franmor Drive at about 2:00 pm. Our neighbour had her Golden Retriever out at about 10:00 and she noticed two coyotes coming towards the dog. Quick action got the dog inside as she is deaf and old.
More coyotes have been seen searching for rabbits in the middle of our units over the last several weeks – usually in the early mornings. Last night (December 24) one tripped our motion detector at our back porch at about 11:00 pm. Jim Watt

Snowy Owl: Here are some pictures of a Snowy Owl at the Peterborough Airport on December 26 at  about 4:00 PM. Apart from the one “artistic” shot, these images present a hunting sequence. After the kill, we have the gulp (vole’s tail visible if you look closely) and then a satisfied stare-down.  Dennis Vanderspek

Snowy Owl with vole – Dec. 26, 2018 – Ptbo Airport – Dennis Vanderspek

Snowy Owl swallowing vole (tail visible) -Dec. 26, 2018 – Ptbo Airport – Dennis Vanderspek

Snowy Owl – a satisfied stare-down – Dec. 26, 2018 – Ptbo Airport – Dennis Vanderspek

Snowy Owl flying – Dec. 26, 2018 – Ptbo Airport – Dennis Vanderspek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) (1)
– Reported Dec 24, 2018 by Drew Monkman
– Cabot Street, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50988398
– Comments: “Don Frederick of 1224 Cabot St. saw adult male pheasant walk across his yard”

Ring-necked Pheasant – Lindsay – Nov. 2, 2016 – Jeff Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coyotes in Peterborough:

  1. There is a nightly serenade, pretty much every night after midnight, coming from the St. Peter’s High School/Medical Drive/Jackson Creek area. I really don’t know how many are in the chorus, but it sounds like a lot. I have a client who drives a cab during the wee hours of the morning, and he reports seeing Coyotes all over town. Folks who still let their cats wander at night should take note. The Coyotes will accomplish what the by-law could not. I will now revise my observation of a “gray, squirrel-eating fox” earlier this year and admit it was likely a Coyote. Larry Love (December 23)

Eastern Coyote on Otonabee River – Tom Northey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. We live near Barnardo Park in Peterborough. Over the past few weeks (early to mid-December), we’ve been hearing coyotes howl at night, and it’s getting louder. We’ll sit on our front porch and listen – the kids think it’s amazing. I suspect they’re in the green corridor between Chemong and Hilliard. People have started parking at the tennis courts there after dark and sitting listening to them. It’s almost like being back in the North. Kennedy Gordon

Coyotes in field on Stewart Line (Randy Therrien)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. On Monday night, December 3, at about 10:30 pm we had a family of six Coyotes make a visit -( Mom, Pop and the 4 full grown kids). They were right up under our bird feeders by our back deck. We are on Franmor drive. We have the TSW Canal on our east side and the 5th hole of the PTBO Golf and Country Club on the north.

This is the first sighting in our area as the TSW waterway usually keeps them on the east side of the Canal where there is lots of bush right up to the University for them to roam. In the past I have seen one or two on the ice along hole #7. With the work being done on the TSW they have created a coffer dam where it narrows down going south towards the Parkhill Swing Bridge, and I am assuming that they have crossed there. We have notified all of our neighbours with pets (no leaving them out on a leash ) an have used Babcock and Robinson who are the property managers for the units along Armour Road that border on the golf course.  Jim Watt, Peterborough

Coyote – Maggie Sharpe – Oct. 2014 – Cave Road

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker (December 17):   For the second day in a row, we’ve had a Red bellied woodpecker at our peanut feeder. Mike Barker, Algonquin Boulevard 

Red-bellied Woodpecker – Lynde Creek, Whitby- Photo by Brian Crangle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) (1)
– Reported Dec 22, 2018 15:10 by Dave Milsom
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “continuing male”

Male Wood Duck – Jeff Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Dec 22, 2018 10:40 by Steve Paul
– Peterborough Airport, Fraserville, Ontario, CA (44.236, -78.359), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50873671
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Located inside the airport compounds. Very observant of surroundings – had 360 view all around it but did not move the entire time I was watching it. Kept distance and took pictures with zoom.”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Dec 21, 2018 12:45 by Ben Taylor
– Engleburn ave, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50844374
– Comments: “Sitting in a tree at the south end of the island overlooking the mudflat.”

White-tailed Deer: On December 14, from about 8 – 8:45 am, four deer (one small one from this spring and three females/juveniles) were milling around in the field about 80 m south of our house south of Lakefield. At 8:50, all four of them swam the Otonabee (midway between Locks 24 & 25), west to east and came up on County Road 32 before heading into the woods.

I also saw a big eight-point buck in the same field about 1:30 pm on Nov. 19. It swam about a third of the way across the river, then turned around and came back to shore quite close to the house, before  going off into the fields to the west of us. He was very cryptic against the background of a winter foliage of dried goldenrod – the colour of the deer and goldenrod matched almost perfectly! Annamarie Beckel, Lakefield

White-tailed Deer – Stephenie Armstrong – June 1, 2017

White-tailed Deer – Randy Therrien

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) (1)
– Reported Dec 19, 2018 09:40 by Erica Nol
– Division at 5th line, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Continuing bird, in Eastern White Cedar at se corner of intersection. Sat on cedar rail fence in woods.”

Carolina Wren – April 2018 – Don Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Dec 19, 2018 13:45 by Jeff Stewart
– 621 Carveth Drive, Millbrook, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Cont. bird, on lower ledge of east side of white Ont. government building”

Common Raven – I see a pair of ravens at least daily west of Omemee, adjacent to the Pigeon River wetlands. Surely they’ve resided here for awhile. The book “The Ravenmaster” by Christopher Skaife
caused me to observe them more closely. I’m intrigued. Kate Arthur
N.B. Yes, ravens have really been increasing in number and distribution south of the Canadian Shield in Ontario over the past decade. I now see them regularly in Peterborough and often hear of reports from the GTA, too. They are breeding south of the Shield as well, including a pair near Omemee. Interesting phenomenon. DM 

Common Raven – Wikimedia

Golden Eagle (left) & Common Raven at Petroglyph Provincial Park. Feeding on deer carcass. (Tim Dyson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) (1)
– Reported Dec 16, 2018 08:00 by Bill Crins
– Peterborough CBC, Area 4, East City to E. edge, W. of Douro, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “seen between 9:35 – 9:40; relatively large wren; reddish brown cap, back, wings, tail; strong white supercilium extending almost to nape; relatively long, slightly downcurved beak; buffy coloration on breast, belly and flanks; tail occasionally cocked upwards; bird was silent during observation period; bird was noted by observing movement in vines adjacent to old rail fence; did not respond very readily to spishing, but kept moving along old fence and in viny tangles; extremely skulky; found in NW. corner of junction of Division Rd. and Douro 5th Line, in low area beside driveway (did not see bird go to feeders, but there were feeders in the backyard up the driveway)”

Carolina Wren – April 2018 – Don Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Dec 17, 2018 15:35 by Erica Nol
– Airport Rd dead end, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “continuing bird; perched on utility pole at dead end of Airport Rd, east of large Flying Colours building”

Snowy Owl – Lindsay – Dec. 20, 2014 – Tim Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Dec 16, 2018 14:40 by Matthew Tobey
– Peterborough–Airport Rd Railroad, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50736266
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Subadult bird hunting in swamp along railroad tracks just northeast of Brown Ln, less than 50m from nest where 2 GHOW owlets fledged this spring.”

Great Horned Owl – Dec. 23, 2015 – Glen Grills

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (1)
– Reported Dec 16, 2018 08:10 by Rene Gareau
– Peterborough CBC Area 7, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50747151
– Media: 1 Audio
– Comments: “Responded to playback at Harper Park. Flew in so close to investigate the tape that the bird was visible in midair right in front of us despite the dim predawn light. Audio recorded.”

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Dave Heuft)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Screech-Owl (Megascops asio) (1)
– Reported Dec 16, 2018 08:10 by Dylan Radcliffe
– Peterborough CBC Area 7, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist:
– Comments: “Mervin Ln. Responded to playback.”

Eastern Screech owl – red phase – 9th Line of Selwyn Twsp – March 11, 2017 – Kathy McCue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl on Parkhill Road – This morning, Liliana Perez found a Barred Owl on Parkhill Road, about 200 metres east of Brealey Drive. It sat out in the open on a telephone cable and then in a nearby tree for at least 20 minutes. I was able to get several pictures.  Drew Monkman

 

Barred Owl – Parkhill Road – Dec. 14 2018 – Drew Monkman

Barred Owl – Parkhill Road -Dec. 14 2018 – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Dec 13, 2018 14:00 by Ben Taylor
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Noticed having a meal on top of the SE corner of the MNR North Block.”

Peregrine perched on steel girder – Wikimedia

Peregrine eating Rock Pigeon – Loree Stephens 2 – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) (1)
– Reported Dec 13, 2018 07:50 by Iain Rayner
– Otonabee River–between Lock 25 and Lakefield, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Male, swimming with MALL adjacent to road…continuing I believe.”

Wood Duck – Jeff Keller

Wood Duck in flight – April 2018 – Mike Faught

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl at Peterborough Airport – We have a visitor at the Peterborough Airport. I photographed it today, December 10.  Carl Welbourn, Kawartha Camera Club

SNOW – Dec. 10 2018 – Ptbo Airport – Carl Welbourn

SNOW 2 – Dec. 10 2018 – Ptbo Airport – Carl Welbourn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl – I photographed this owl near Peterborough (east part of 4th Line) on December 9 at 4 pm. It was a life bird for me! Trudy Gibson

Snowy Owl – Trudy Gibson – Dec. 9, 2018

 

Snowy Owl near Lindsay –  I have been taking photos of Snowy Owls in the Cunningham’s Corners area, just southeast of Lindsay. Here is one of my pictures from December 8.  Tim Corner

 

Snowy Owl – December 2018 – Lindsay area – Tim Corner

 

Greater Scaup (Aythya marila) (1)
– Reported Dec 08, 2018 08:26 by Iain Rayner
– Otonabee River–between Lock 25 and Lakefield, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4132687,-78.2625462&ll=44.4132687,-78.2625462
Checklist:
– Comments: “Male swimming passively with geese and showing signs of molt. Dark rounded head peaking above eye as opposed to rear of head. Large dark nail. Grey flanks and back although still showing some dark feathers. Took pics that may help”

Greater Scaup (male) photo from Wikimedia

Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) (1)
– Reported Dec 08, 2018 09:00 by Peterborough County Birds Database
– 621 Carveth Drive, Millbrook, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50511540
– Comments: “Adult, very large accipiter with long tail, whitish-grey under parts and dark cap / white eyebrow visible, probably female by size, heard jay alarm calls first then goshawk landed near top of large maple by house then headed behind house towards bird feeders.”

Northern Goshawk – Wikimedia

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) (1)
– Reported Nov 30, 2018 07:15 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50314082

Great Horned Owl – Dec. 23, 2015 – Glen Grills

American Coot (Fulica americana) (1)
– Reported Dec 02, 2018 13:13 by Steve Paul
– Peterborough–Auburn Reach Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Continuing bird. Out in water close to shore at south end of park.”

American Coot (Karl Egressy)

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Dec 03, 2018 16:11 by Ryan Campbell
– 115 @ Tapley 1/4 Line, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 3 Photos

Snowy Owl – Nov. 29, 2018 – Lindsay area – Carl Welbourn

Sep 222018
 

Peterborough Field Naturalists Sunday AM Nature Walk (Sept. 30)

Today, a group of us walked along the hydro corridor west of Hetherington Dr. (just south of Woodland) and into the north end of University Heights Park. We enjoyed the abundant asters (e.g., New England, Heath, Panicled, Heart-leaved), Zig-Zag Goldenrod, White Baneberry with its doll’s-eye fruit and a single Jack-in-the-Pulpit with its ball of red fruit. Birds of interest included White-throated Sparrow (20), White-crowned Sparrow (1), Song Sparrow (12), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1), Golden-crowned Kinglet (1), Eastern Towhee (1), Nashville Warbler (1), Palm Warbler (1), Belted Kingfisher (1), Pileated Woodpecker (1), Northern Flicker (1) and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (1). Earlier, we found a single Swainson’s Thrush on the Parkway Trail, just south of Cumberland Drive. Drew Monkman

White-crowned Sparrow (immature) – University Heights Hydro Corridor – Sept. 30, 2018, Reem Ali

 

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet has a prominent eye ring. (Karl Egressy)

Golden-crowned Kinglet – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lincoln’s Sparrow (2) via eBird
– Reported Sep 30, 2018 07:36 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Lincoln’s Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (1) via eBird
– Reported Sep 27, 2018 13:01 by Daniel Williams
– Ingleton-Wells Property (Kawartha Land Trust), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Barred Owl on Northey’s Bay Road – Jeff Keller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peregrine Falcon  (1) via eBird
– Reported Sep 27, 2018 08:12 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Large adult eating bird atop 300 Water St.”

Peregrine – by Stephanie Pineau – Jan. 13, 2015 – PRHC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-winged Teal (2) via eBirds
– Reported Sep 23, 2018 10:36 by Rene Gareau
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Blue-winged Teal – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Squirrels hoarding rocks:  I just found your site and wanted to add my comments regarding gray & black squirrels stealing rocks. Here in Chilliwack, BC  we have been observing squirrels stealing hundreds of rocks every fall and winter. They steal all sizes, types, and work all day to take away their treasure. This usually starts when seasons change with wet and cooler days arriving. I think they hoard the rocks to stabilize their dreys and also putting the flat ones inside the nest to warm the bed over the winter for the young when they are born and vulnerable. I’m basing this on many hours of watching squirrel behavior from our living room which faces a heavily forested back garden. My husband and I are constantly renewing our landscaping rocks with humour at the hard work of these amazing little critters. Jenne Breedon, Chilliwack, BC

(Note: For other reports on this behaviour, see November 30, 2014 )

Gray Squirrel with stone – Nov. 2014 – Ginny Clark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lincoln’s Sparrow (2) via eBird
– Reported Sep 23, 2018 13:53 by Luke Berg
– LHT Redmond Rd to Drummond Line , Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Lincoln’s Sparrow – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starry Stonewort, a new aquatic invasive species:  I want to let you know about a (new to me) threat to our Kawartha Lakes. A macro  algae has infested Lake Scugog and is now thriving in parts of Stony, notably the Lost Channel. Starry Stonewort has no roots and forms masses up to six feet deep floating below the surface.  Carol Cole, a cottager on Stony Lake writes: “It was first noticed there a couple of summers ago.  The channel is not open water really; it is more of a wetland environment.  The alga is now covering large sections of the wetland and has spread incredibly quickly into the bays on either end.  One of the bays is now almost totally covered.  It used to be a very weedy area but now it looks clear of weeds – unless you look down.  The bay at the other end isn’t quite as bad but it will be by next summer.  Both of these bays lead directly to the main boating channel of the Trent-Severn Waterway.  Both have cottages and boat traffic. Not far from the bay already covered is a wetland that has been declared provincially significant. Starry Stonewort spreads by fragmentation and the only way to stop it from spreading to other lakes is to clean, dry and drain out boats, canoes or kayaks before leaving the lake. Since this is already in Stoney Lake there isn’t anything we can do about it. All we can do now is prevent it from reaching other lakes. ”

Please spread the word! Sandra Burri, Kawartha Park, Clear Lake

Starry Stonewort from Lake Scugog – Scugog Lake Stewards photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More about Starry Stonewort:  CLIMATE CHANGE REALITY IN SCUGOG SHOULD CHANGE OUR PEOPLE-CENTRIC VIEW OF OUR LAKE. Ours is a shallow lake held at its current height by a dam at Lindsay. As a result of increased temperatures, increased storm water runoff, difficult invasive species due to our location in Southern Ontario and increased development, ours is an ecosystem that is vulnerable and susceptible to change. This year, the lake has generally been excellent for recreation and surface aesthetics because of a vast understory of the invasive alga, Starry Stonewort (SS) and abundant zebra mussels that enjoy co-habiting with SS. But is this good habitat for everything else that lives in, on or above the lake? The Stewards and our colleagues at U.O.I.T. and Kawartha Conservation are studying this new invader which seems to be spreading rapidly up throughout the hard-water Kawartha Lakes and Lake Simcoe. We have one more year in our Trillium grant funding for research, but we hope to extend our research for two more years, trying to ascertain the Ontario-wide spread and effects of this nasty invader. Use a rake to pull up a sample from the lake bottom. If you find a crunchy, green fishing line type bottom cover that is the algae — Starry Stonewort. CLEAN, DRAIN, DRY your boat before coming into, or going out of, Lake Scugog.  Scugog Lake Stewards, City of Kawartha Lakes

Cooper’s Hawk: We have a bird feeder outside our condo living room at the corner of Parkhill and Ravenwood Dr. On September 21, we were able to get this picture of a Cooper’s Hawk. We had never seen this bird before.  John & Stephanie MacDonald

Cooper’s Hawk – John MacDonald – Sept. 22 2018 – Peterborough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake: My nephew and sister came across this Eastern Hog-nosed Snake recently at Wolf Lake near Apsley. Bill Astell, Peterborough

(Note: The Eastern Hog-nosed is a species at risk in Ontario and only rarely seen. DM)

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake – via Bill Astell – Sept. 2018 – Wolf Lake near Apsley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A “dew” bath: I witnessed something absolutely new for me on the morning of September 18. At about 7:30 am, I saw two Song Sparrows giving themselves a bath in the heavy dewed grass. They burrowed down and splashed the dew on by rapidly flicking their wings onto their backs. Michael Gillespie, Keene

Song Sparrow – Karl Egressy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandhill Cranes: It is that time again when the Sandhill Cranes begin to gather before migrating south. In the area west of Lindsay (Black School Rd area) the gathering has already started. These pictures were taken on September 18.   Tim Corner

Sandhill Cranes – Lindsay area – Sept. 18 2018 – Tim Corner

Sandhill Cranes – Sept. 18 2018 – Lindsay area – Tim Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poecila Sphinx:  On Friday, September 14, we came across the caterpillar of the Poecila Sphinx Moth (also called Northern Apple Sphinx). It measured about two inches long. We had  never seen one before.  The caterpillar was on a Sweet Gale bush, a species that dominates the banks of the Indian River near our home. This plant can be used as an insecticide, can treat scabies, used with discretion to flavour soups and stews, flavours Gale beer, repels fleas, and the roots and bark produce a yellow dye for wool.  Quite a list!  The scent on the leaves was rather faint when I checked but given the time of year that’s not surprising.    Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Poecila Sphinx Moth caterpillar on Sweet Gale – Indian River – September 2018 – Stephenie Armstrong

Poecila Sphinx Moth caterpillar on Sweet Gale shrub – Indian River – September 2018 – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Screech-Owl (via eBird):  – Reported Sep 13, 2018 20:10 by Patrick Scanlon- Indian River Road., Peterborough, Ontario- Map: – Checklist: – Comments: “Singing from the west side of the river.”

Eastern Screech-owl – Beaches area of Toronto – via Jamie Brockley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merlin: My husband, Michael, noticed this Merlin while we were having lunch on September 13. We watched it for about 10 to 15 minutes. It was looking at our bird feeder (and doing a bit of head bobbing) from the top of the umbrella of our outdoor picnic table. A few minutes  later it landed right on top of the bird feeder. Our feeder has been quite active with American Goldfinches, Purple Finches, chickadees, cardinals,  a few jays and some sparrows. The bird sort of half-heartedly swooped downward toward a scurrying squirrel before it left our yard. There were no smaller birds during the time of the visit of the Merlin. Not surprising. It was very cool!!  Helen Bested, Lynhaven Road, Peterborough

Merlin – Lynhaven Road – September 13, 2018 – Michael Bested

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Imperial Moth caterpillar: On September 7, this Imperial Moth caterpillar, a member of the Giant Silkworm Moth family, was making its way along our side path, heading for river rocks abutting a flower bed.  I gather it feeds on a variety of plants including pines and oaks which we have in abundance.  And later that day, I saw another one floating vertically, head out of water, in our small creek that empties into the Indian River. I managed to retrieve it but there was no sign of life.  I hope one day to actually see this beautifully colored moth, though it is said to be in decline.  As you have explained in your book ‘Nature’s Year’, it is extremely attracted to light making it highly visible to predators.  Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Imperial Moth caterpillar – September 2018 – Indian River – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feb 062018
 

I heard a Great Horned owl at the edge of the cedar/ash/white pine forest by the Otonabee River near 9th line. On Feb 10- 5:45 am. Susan Chow

Great Horned Owl – Dec. 23, 2015 – Glen Grills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Feb 09, 2018 18:30 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Rotary Park & Walkway, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42629795
– Comments: “heard vocalizing three times from the direction of Nichol’s Oval at the entrance to the park at Rogers St.”

Barred Owl – Wilco Overink – Nov. 29, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is an abundance of Snowy Owls in our area this year. Most any concession in the Lindsay area will yield a Snowy. Try Post Road (Hwy 7 north to Hwy 36) and Fieldside Road (Cheese Factory Road intersection).  The bird photographed here is the closest to home I have sighted. Feb 9 / 2018 at the Bypass & Bensford Bridge Rd ramp.  Carl Welbourn, Kawartha Camera Club

Snowy Owl – Feb. 9, 2018 – Carl Welbourn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Feb 09, 2018 12:30 by Basil Conlin
– Lady Eaton Drumlin, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42625033
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “sitting about 50m away from flock of feeding robins, perhaps waiting for one to let its guard down?”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Feb 09, 2018 08:32 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–King St just W George St, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42615388
– Comments: “perched on communication towers atop Charlotte Towers (245 Charlotte St)”

I took this picture of a Cooper’s Hawk on February 6 behind our unit. It was on a Rock Pigeon.  Don Finigan

Cooper’s Hawk – Don Finigan – Feb. 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, Feb. 6, at about 2:00 pm, I had a Carolina Wren at my feeder eating suet. The bird feeder is high up – at the back of the
house. I live at 123 Creekwood Drive in Peterborough.

Sherry Hambly

Carolina Wren – Feb. 6 2018 – Creekwood Dr. PTBO – Sherry Hambly

Carolina Wren (Wikimedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported Feb 04, 2018 20:00 by Brendan Boyd
– 711 Armour Rd, Peterborough CA-ON (44.3159,-78.3098), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “A yard bird I never expected. Sitting on the hydro line above the driveway.”

Barred Owl Feb. 8, 2015 – Television Road – Brenda Ibey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) (2)

– Reported Feb 04, 2018 16:11 by Matthew Tobey
– Peterborough–Harper Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Calling near park entrance at 1740.”

Northern Saw-Whet Owl – Kelly Simmonds – March 26, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (4)
– Reported Feb 03, 2018 14:38 by Warren Dunlop
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “2 individuals & one group of 2 – all flyovers calling – gip gip gip.”

Red Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

Jan 192018
 

We have been getting a pair of Red-bellied Woodpeckers for the last 2 years. We also had a sighting of a Red-headed Woodpecker this past September (2017). I feed all year so we get a lot of different birds here. I also sighted a pair of Sandhill Cranes in September. We are just north of Millbrook on Fallis Line. Ab Parsons

Red-headed Woodpecker – May 28, 2017 – Buckhorn Lake -Nima Taghaboni

Virginia Opossum in Ennismore – 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virginia Opossums: We have 3 opossums living in our garage/hut –  a father, mother and baby. The male is a big white one; the female is grey and the baby is grey. The baby is about half the size of the mother. We live near Rice Lake on Wood Duck Drive on the north shore of Rice Lake. They are wandering around probably in the wooded area behind us which is owned by Southview Cottages. Sandy Kirkland

Virginia Opossum – Rice Lake – Jan. 2018 – Sandy Kirkwood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 10:30 by Ryan Hill
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “just off main road, a bit north of the gate”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

 

 

Red_Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (3)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 10:30 by Ryan Hill
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 14:48 by Toby Rowland
– Lakefield- Lakefield Marshland, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41807307
– Comments: “Continuing female WWSC from the report yesterday. Amongst mixed male and female COGO – will add photos ”

White-winged Scoter on Otonabee River – Tom Northey – Feb. 2, 2014

Male Red-breasted Merganser (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
– Reported Jan 09, 2018 15:33 by Chris Risley
– Peterborough–Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41804772
– Comments: “long bill, green head, shaggy back of head, brown breast band; swimming in open water opposite Beavermead Park”

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) (1)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 15:30 by Ben Taylor
– feeder on County Rod 6, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “continuing bird at house at 3372 County Road Six. Actively feeding at feeder”

Sparrow-like female Rose-breasted Grosbeak – Cindy Bartoli

Male White-winged Crossbill – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White-winged Crossbill (Loxia leucoptera) (4)
– Reported Jan 10, 2018 09:30 by Chris Risley
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Heard and then saw flying over trees. Distinctive chips checked with recording online. Familiar with these chips”

On January 9, we had 15 American Robins at our house in Campbellford.  Donald Munro

American Robins feeding on Wild Grape – Beavermead Park – Feb. 7, 2016 – Helen & Larry Keller –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While having morning coffee, this Cooper’s Hawk swept down to the deck and caught a Mourning Dove having a drink at the heated bird bath. Took over an hour for her to finish her meal and leave.  Sue Paradisis 

Cooper’s Hawk eating Mourning Dove – January 2018 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-winged Blackbird, male, spotted in the morning on January 12th, at my feeder on George Street in Lakefield. Don’t usually see these until March! John Dandrea

Red-winged Blackbirds – Dec. 23, 2017 – Fife Line _ Michael Gillespie

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker – Campbellford – January 2017 – Donald Munro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker: (Observed Jan. 7, 2018) We live at the corner of Centre Road and County Rd 32, aka River Road. This is the first Red-bellied for us. Luba Klama

Dec 082017
 

N.B. Whenever I refer to “home”, it is between Warsaw and Lakefield, south of the Sawer Creek Wetland.

Passerines and other birds and animals.

  • A Yellow-billed Cuckoo flew over my kayak as I began to paddle up the Indian River from Back Dam Park at Warsaw on September 9th. It called twice upon landing across the river.
  • This was the last date I saw the Great Egret that I had originally discovered there on August 5th.
  • Two Red Crossbills were also seen and heard a little way up the river on that day, and others were seen and/or heard several times over the course of the fall at Warsaw, at home, and spots around Stoney Lake, Northey’s Bay Road, and Nepthon. No real “flocks” as yet, but birds numbered from one to six individuals when encountered. Most recent were six at home on December 5th.
  • An American Pipit was skulking about in a pasture south of Long Lake, NW of Warsaw, on September 28th.
  • Pine Siskins have been occasional from early October to present. With the exception of 40+ birds seen near Warsaw on November 22nd, (and not unlike the crossbills that have been around), siskin numbers remain rather low.
  • On October 26th, at Nephton Ridge, I saw my last Monarch of the year. It was #532 for 2017, which is more than double my previous highest annual count since I began counting them seven years ago. Of the 532, 31 were observed as road fatalities.
  • Also on October 26th, I heard a Greater Yellowlegs call before dawn from the starry sky above at home, and another near Nephton Ridge later that morning.
  • One Tundra Swan with nine Canada Geese was seen flying overhead at home on October 27th, 28th and 30th. A lone Tundra Swan flew over the same location on November 2nd. I wondered if it was the one who had been flying with the nine geese?
  • On September 24th, I stepped out of dense cedars into a pasture and found myself very close to two Sandhill Cranes. They seemed at ease as long as I stayed in motion, just walking about as they were. Whenever I stopped or crouched, they moved away from me.

  • The loud calling of just over 300 Sandhill Cranes in two groups on Nov. 17th was heard as the birds were heading westward over my house. I photographed each entire flock at wide angle so I could later zoom the images on the computer and get an exact count. The first flock at 2:13pm numbered 173 birds and the second group four minutes later contained 128 for a combined total of 301 cranes. These birds were very likely the same, or associated with the large groups that Bill Buddle had reported at about 2:30pm the same day over Lakefield.

  • Ed Heuvel and I saw a much smaller flock of seven birds over his house between Cottesloe and Norwood on Nov. 23rd.
  • No doubt due to the warmth of early December, two Eastern Chipmunks were seen running across Round Lake Road north of Havelock on December 4th. They had all but disappeared not too long ago, and I’ve now seen five back out just this month.
  • Another warm weather sighting was of a Leopard Frog hopping across the yard at home on December 5th. I took some photos, and half an hour later, it was nowhere to be found.

  • On December 8th 2017, Ed Heuvel reported a road-killed Virginia Opossum he had just seen along Hwy 7 south of Sherbrooke Street.

   Raptors of interest

  • On September 11th, an immature Peregrine appeared amidst twenty-four kettling Turkey Vultures NW of Warsaw. The falcon harassed a couple of the vultures before peeling off on its own, heading SW.

  • As is my habit if I am out in the yard after dark during the fall or winter, I called for owls. From about the 24th of September until about the 3rd of November, Saw-whet Owls move about during their annual fall migration. The first that responded to my calls this year was a single bird on September 29th. On October 18th, however, no less than four of the little owls showed up inside of about a minute of my first attempt at calling. One was in the spruces to the east of the yard, while the other three were surrounding me, within the small grove of apple trees where I stood. With the three of them looking at each other more than at me, I found it easy to take some photos of the two that were closest to me, (about two metres away).
  • Dates later than the average “end date” of their normal migration that I have called one in this year have been November 8th, 12th, 27th and December 1st. These likely represent one or more wintering birds, and all have been at home near Warsaw.

  • Ed Heuvel flushed a Short-eared Owl from the ground on the morning of Oct. 17th on his 40 acre property NW of Norwood while out for a walk with his dog. Ed has turned what was once a sloping old field into a thriving tallgrass prairie, having seeded it with many native prairie plant species. I thought it quite fitting for such a bird to turn up in this “new” prairie grassland habitat. Good one, Ed!!
  • Paddling up the Indian River from Back Dam again on October 21st, Angela and I saw a few good raptors during our time on the water. First was an immature Northern Goshawk flying overhead, and then, about two minutes later, an immature Cooper’s Hawk following almost the exact same “path”. A while later, paddling back downstream, Angela spotted an adult male Merlin as it perched in the dead top branches of a spruce. Driving back through Warsaw, a Red-tailed Hawk soared low over the village. We headed up Payne’s Line towards home and spotted the first Golden Eagle of the season (a sub-adult bird) slowly soaring not far from the large metal tower there. We took a few photos and headed home. The next day, I saw another (immature this time) Golden Eagle fly over, east to west, from the yard at home.

  • I was accompanied by three friends, (Drew Monkman, Martin Parker, and Ed Heuvel) on Oct. 26th for a few hours of raptor watching in the Nephton Ridge/Kosh Lake area at the east end of County Road #6. My one intent for the day was to point out to Drew, his first “Ontario” Golden Eagle. Well, unless the “eagle sp.” we saw that morning was a Golden, we did not see one. However, we were treated to 8 Bald Eagles which, apart from one 4th winter bird, all were adults. At one point, four adult Balds soared together directly overhead. A while later, two adults came along together, and after that, another by itself. Since there was such a lack of immature eagles, and the fact that four adults had come from different directions, soared a while together, and then dispersed somewhat northward… we questioned how many of them might have actually even been migrants, or perhaps local breeding birds. Additional raptors for the day were five Red-tailed Hawks, and two (one adult and one immature) Red-shouldered Hawks.

  • Just after 11:00am on Nov. 11th a group of large birds caught my eye to the north of the house. On closer inspection, I could see three Common Ravens dive-bombing an immature Golden Eagle. I watched them for several minutes before the ravens went east and the eagle, west.

  • On October 29th a dark morph Rough-legged Hawk was seen perched in a tree along County Rd #6 just west of Camp Line. It was the first of the season for me, and since, I’ve seen another eight Rough-legs between Norwood and Lakefield. Of the nine seen so far, three have been dark morph birds.
  • Having had seen no immature Bald Eagles during the autumn season as yet, on the morning of Nov. 17th, two 1st winter birds, and then a 2nd winter bird appeared soaring over my yard in a ten-minute period. They all seemed to come from the west, and once a considerable altitude was reached, they each headed off in completely different directions. I suspect that they had all spent some time feeding together, and were now dispersing. It was only two days after the annual rifle deer hunt had ended, and I wondered if they had just dined on the gut pile of a deer left somewhere by hunters.
  • The great backyard birding continued on November 26th, as no sooner had I sat in the yard with my morning coffee, an immature Northern Goshawk flew from east to west. If that wasn’t enough, my fourth Golden Eagle of the season (an adult) appeared over the forest to the east, soared two circles, and headed back east just after noon.
  • Nov. 29th an adult rufous morph Red-tailed Hawk soared over the yard. I had to run in and get the scope as it looked not like a typical Red-tail. The rusty-red undersides and the dark brown back were easily seen with the optics. It had been a long time since I’ve seen this variety of the species.
  • On the night of December 01 – 02, after calling at home for Screech, Saw-whet, and Boreal Owls, (the latter, because you never know if you don’t try), I finally stirred an Eastern Screech Owl who called for quite a while afterwards. And briefly, a Northern Saw-whet Owl answered my calls with the “tew, tew, tew” call. About an hour later, just after mid-night, while bringing in some firewood, the pair of Northern Barred Owls that live on the property year-round, began calling with hoots which soon morphed into their monkey-like “whacka, whacka, whacka” calls. Not too bad for spending a little time in the yard after dark!!
  • Just after 2:00pm on December 6th, I saw a large, pale bird far out to the east, soaring in wide circles. It appeared gull-like as it moved quite fast in the strong winds. I got the scope on it just before it passed in behind the treetops and out of my view. Revealed by the scope was the darkish under-body contrasting with entirely white undersides of the wings of an immature Snowy Owl. Unless my memory is misfiring, this would be the first of this species I have seen this century. If that wasn’t enough stimulation for one day, a little over an hour later, I saw a second Snowy for the day as it flew into strong south winds at 3:15pm. The latter bird was decidedly whiter than the first, with very few dark markings. The first bird simply would not show up in the photos I took, (too far), and the camera was nowhere near me as I watched the second owl sail past much closer. Both were heading in a north-to-south direction, lending a little support to the idea that they might have been in migration at the time.
  • On December 7th while I still lay in bed, through the window next to me, I spotted a 1st winter Bald Eagle fly past over the trees to the east. It soared briefly and then continued on in a SE direction.
  • While moving the fallen foliage around with the leaf blower on December 8th at home, I looked up, (as I find I constantly am doing these days) and saw two large, dark birds very high almost straight above me. Before I was able to grab the scope, I could see that they were eagles. Once in focus, the white bases of tails and primaries with all other plumage completely dark, identified them both as 1st winter Golden Eagles. A strong and steady SW wind pushed them NW of me. They were only about ten wingspans (about 20 m) apart and one was just a little ahead of the other. They slowed briefly once or twice, but never paused to soar while I had them in view.

1st winter Golden Eagle – USFWS

Tim Dyson – Warsaw

Oct 232017
 

 

 October 28 – For the second time this week, a Cooper’s Hawk was in my yard today. I knew it was around because a couple of dozen Mourning Doves flew out of the spruce tree they roost in.  Sue Paradisis

Cooper’s Hawk on Rock Pigeon – Helen Nicolaides Keller

 

 Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) (2)
– Reported Oct 28, 2017 11:59 by Iain Rayner
– Pigeon Lake–Sandy Point, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Dirtyish cheeks and neck, long bill”

Red-necked Grebe. The grebe in the lower right is in winter plumage. – Wikimedia

 
October 27 – I had four Red-shouldered Hawks here at home today, plus nine Red-tailed Hawks, and one  Sharp-shinned Hawk for my hours sitting out in between chopping wood. The Red-shouldered Hawks were three adults and one immature, and the Red-tailed Hawks were about half and half. The Sharp-shinned Hawk? Couldn’t tell – a bit too high. For a little while at least, it was hopping around the sky here!! No more Monarchs since #532 on October 26 at Nephton. I don’t believe I’ve ever had a November sighting, but if I am going to, I’ll bet it will be this year. This last week of October is certainly the best week of the year, not only to count Red-tailed Hawks and Golden Eagles, but also Red-shouldered Hawks, as well. I am glad to be getting out and looking up.  Tim Dyson, Warsaw

Red-shouldered Hawk – Karl Egressy

 

Monarch – Saw a Monarch today, October 26, on Nephton Ridge, near Petroglyph Provincial Park. Was gliding southward about 50′ above ground despite temperature around 8C!  Drew Monkman

Monarch Butterfly – Terry Carpenter

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Oct 27, 2017 07:50 by Scott Gibson
– Downtown – MNR Building, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Peregrine – often seen on MNR Bldg & sometimes clock tower in downtown Peterborough (Rick Stankiewicz)

Mallard: Here’s a photo of a leucistic (lacking normal pigment) Mallard photographed this summer near Whitaker Street, west of Armour Street North in Peterborough. The bird departed in early October. We nick-named the bird “Miss Vicky”!  Gord Young

Leucistic mallard – Whitaker Mills, Ptbo – summer 2017 – Gord Young

American Robin:  Watched a small flock today, October 23, feeding on abundant berry-like cones of Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginia) at Roper Park –  Drew Monkman

Robin feeding on E. Red Cedar berries at Roper Park 2017-10-23 – Drew Monkman

Berry-like cones of Eastern Red Cedar – Sept. 19, 2017 – PRHC – Drew Monkman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolina Wren:  Turned up at my feeder today, October 23.  Phil McKeating, Creekwood Drive, near Harper Park in Peterborough

 

Carolina Wren (Wikimedia)

Black Scoter (Melanitta americana) (2)
– Reported Oct 23, 2017 07:44 by Iain Rayner
– Pigeon Lake–Sandy Point, Peterborough, Ontario
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– Comments: “Female type. Black ducks with pale cheek”

Black Scoter – Crossley ID Guide of Eastern Birds – Wikimedia

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 10:45 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Peterborough, Ontario
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– Comments: “calling (‘crick’) from high in Red Pine then in flight W over beaver pond; W side entrance loop road around 250 m N of locked gate at CR 56.”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 08:25 by Brian Wales
– Peterborough Landfill Wetland Project ponds, Peterborough, Ontario
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– Comments: “white goose with clear grinning patch along beak”

SNGO – Rice L. – Oct. 18, 2014 -Ron Mackay

 

Oct. 22 – Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (1)
– Reported Oct 22, 2017 07:06 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Yard – Bear Creek Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
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Red Crossbill – male – Wikimedia

Dec 162016
 

The Northern Flicker was back on December 6 trying to find space in the crab-apple tree with the 2 dozen American Robins that were there. On December 5, the Cooper’s Hawk returned, flushing out a dozen Mourning Doves from the spruce.  Early Monday morning I was entertained by a young squirrel that I guess was experiencing a decent amount of snow for the first time. I watched it come down the truck of a tree, jump into the snow and instantly jump back up on to the trunk of the tree. It jumped into the snow and back on the tree repeatedly and was also running around the tree and pouncing on the snow. It was acting just like a puppy or kitten. Very amusing!

Sue Paradisis, Tudor Crescent

Northern Flicker and American Robin -Sue-Paradisis

Northern Flicker and American Robin -Sue Paradisis

Cooper's Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Cooper’s Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Nov 202016
 
Cooper's Hawk on Rock Pigeon 2 - Helen Nicolaides Keller

Cooper’s Hawk on Rock Pigeon 2 – Helen Nicolaides Keller

On Friday afternoon, November 11, this beautiful adult Cooper’s Hawk made a kill in my east city backyard. It appeared to have taken a Rock Pigeon.

Helen Nicolaides Keller, Mark Street

Cooper's Hawk on Rock Pigeon - Helen Nicolaides Keller

Cooper’s Hawk on Rock Pigeon – Helen Nicolaides Keller

Nov 202016
 

I thought you might be interested in the following: a Gray Squirrel and a Cooper’s Hawk dueled it out on the top rail of our split rail fence in mid-October. For at least 15 minutes they charged at each other fearlessly before the hawk called it quits. (When the hawk took the initiative the squirrel retreated to a lower rail.)
Burke Doran

Cooper's Hawk - Nancy Cafik

Cooper’s Hawk – Nancy Cafik

Jul 292016
 
Cardinal Flower - August 3, 2016 - Big Gull Lake - Elaine Monkman

Cardinal Flower – August 3, 2016 – Big Gull Lake – Elaine Monkman

Here are some sightings of interest from this past week (July 25 – 31, 2016)) at my brother’s cottage on Big Gull Lake, south of Bon Echo Provincial Park.

  1. Family group of Cooper’s Hawks. Two or three very vocal juveniles, “whistling” loudly. As big as adults.
  2. A covey of 8 Ruffed Grouse, almost adult size.
  3. A Hummingbird Clearwing Moth on the petunias at the dock.
  4. A “convocation” of five, non-breeding Common Loons on the lake.
  5. A larval Blue-spotted Salamander, which was still showing gills behind the head. Was in a backwater section of shoreline, protected from waves by a large fallen log.
  6. Several Dragonhunter dragonflies.
  7. Numerous Red-eyed Vireos (probably young ones) on cottage property.
  8. Two Ruby-throated Hummingbirds at nectar feeder.
  9. Cardinal flowers in bloom along shoreline.
  10. Bird song: Hermit Thrush, Red-eyed Vireo, Pine Warbler

Drew Monkman

juvenile Cooper's Hawk - Linda Easton

juvenile Cooper’s Hawk – Linda Easton

Jan 022016
 

This morning was very busy in my yard with my regular leucistic robin, 3 blue jays, a pair of cardinals, doves, chickadees, a white breasted nuthatch and goldfinches all feeding at the same time. I thought all of them had left when the Cooper’s hawk flew into the top of the ash tree at the back of my yard. It sat there for quite some time before I noticed the female cardinal was still in the crab apple tree. She was very aware that the hawk was there and stayed perfectly still in spite of the squirrels going into the tree to feed just a couple of feet away from her. This went on for over 1/2 an hour with neither bird  moving. I kept hoping the pigeons would arrive so she might get away. Finally I intervened. I know the hawk needs to eat but not the only cardinal that comes to my yard! I went out and walked out to the back and took a picture of the hawk before it flew off. Seconds later the cardinal was gone in a flash.

Cooper's Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Cooper’s Hawk on prey  (Karl Egressy)

The leucistic robin (showing patches of white due to abnormal pigmentation) I mentioned has been here for months. It spends most of the day in the shelter of the big spruce beside the crab apple tree. Every so often it comes out of the spruce, eats a few crab apples or comes to the deck for water and then goes back into the spruce. Two days ago, a flock of at least 8 robins flew into the crab apple and started to feed. The leucistic bird came out and vigorously defended its food source. Within minutes the other robins left and it went back to the spruce. Shortly after the Cooper’s hawk came by and chased off 4 pigeons.

I also have a squirrel with a white tail end and a leucistic mourning dove with a white tail.

Sue Paradisis, Tudor Crescent, Peterborough

Leucistic American Robin (Alan Dextrase - April 12, 2013)

Leucistic American Robin (Alan Dextrase – April 12, 2013)

Dec 292014
 

We looked randomly out the window into our yard yesterday (Dec.28th) only to observe a hawk sitting on top of a pile of white feathers! We stood and watched until it flew away with the remainder of its prey. On further inspection the only things remaining on the ground were feathers and a leg. We weren’t quick enough with the camera, so really have no idea what kind of hawk it may have been. The location is Ridgewood Rd. (Woodglade & Sherbrooke).
Perhaps 3 feeders are 2 too many?

Wendy Marrs

Note: The populations of birds that frequent backyard feeders are all quite healthy, so I wouldn’t stop feeding just because the odd individual falls prey to a hawk. D.M.

Cooper's Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Cooper’s Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Aug 212014
 

This picture of a juvenile Cooper’s Hawk was taken on August 2nd at my home near Kerry Line and Pigeon Lake about noon.

Linda Easton

juvenile Cooper's Hawk - Linda Easton

juvenile Cooper’s Hawk – Linda Easton

Note from Tim Dyson, a local raptor expert, who made the identification:

Interesting in Linda`s photo of the Cooper`s, is that it shows an “August” eye colour. They leave the nest and disperse as youngsters throughout the summer, and all the while, most have greenish/gray eyes during this brief period of their lives. In the coming months however, those eyes will become bright yellow. A year from now, most males (and some females) will be showing signs of the eyes turning towards pale orange. After two years of age, males will have either deep orange, or even red eyes. Females take much longer to go through the eye colour change, and some, may not ever even reach the blood-red eyes that the older males have. Interestingly though, males are not sexually mature until their third year, whereas females, they can pair, breed, and raise young after only one year of age. It is common (for accipiters, as well as Red-shouldered, and Broad-winged Hawks), to visit a nest in the spring, and find one completely adult male, with an incubating mate that is still in full immature plumage.

Jan 242010
 

I just had another visit from a Cooper’s Hawk. It comes regularly in early winter and early spring but this is the first time I have spotted it in January.

Location: 1338 Tudor Crescent, Peterborough
Observer: Sue Paradisis