Mar 112017
 

Today ( 10 March 2017) at noon I observed a Merlin in a cedar at the Little Lake Cemetery. Of course, I did not have my camera. He was quite content to sit and let me wander around the base of the tree to get a closer look. On Sunday, March 5, I observed a mature Bald Eagle in flight over Healey Falls on the Trent River.

Carl Welbourn

Merlin – Dec. 30, 2016 – Omemee – Carl Welbourn

Mar 082017
 

There may be a nesting pair of Bald Eagles between Bobcaygeon and Dunsford, Ontario. We have seen them on a nest to the north and east of the bridge over Emily Creek on County Road 36. We drive past this location almost 5 days a week, twice a day. Over the years, we have often seen one eagle in this area, who has shown expressed interest in one of the Osprey nests. However, it seemed to leave after a couple of days. This year there are two…possibly a mating pair? Note that this area is also designated a Provincially Significant Wetland.

Bonnie Townsend, Flynn’s Corners

Location of possible nesting pair of Bald Eagles – March 8, 2016 – Bonnie Townsend

 

Mar 062017
 

On the morning of March 3, my son witnessed two Bald Eagles attacking a Canada Goose in flight. The goose landed in the Crowe River and while landing, swatted the eagle off his side. The second eagle stayed above and did not attack the goose. My son grabbed the binoculars and saw that the goose was injured. The two eagles stayed in the area high above but did swoop down periodically, and I was able to see them with the binoculars as I was skeptical that they were Bald Eagles. We then went on the Internet to see if they frequent this area, as we have been up here since 1980 and this is our first sighting.
Robin Galllagher, Crowe River

Bald Eagles – Jan. 31, 2016, Simmons Ave, Peterborough – Trudy Gibson

Feb 252017
 

This morning (February 24), a Red-winged Blackbird visited our feeder. We’ve also had a Belted Kingfisher on the Otonabee River all winter, along with two juvenile Bald Eagles and quite a few Common Goldeneyes. There has also been a Red-tailed Hawk along the 6th Line of Selwyn.

Annamarie Beckel, Selwyn Township

Female Belted Kingfisher – Jeff Keller (Note: The male does not show any rufous.)

Red-winged Blackbird – Karl Egressy

Feb 172017
 

Two juvenile (first winter?) Bald Eagles – Tim Corner

My friend Dave and I went for a drive up the River Road to see if we could spot some Bald Eagles at Lock 25, south of Lakefield. We were in luck as there was a pair. One bird was perched on a log and the other was on the ice. However, they we across the other side of the river. Later, we went down the 7th line of Selwyn to the end of the road on the west side of the Otonabee and as luck would have it, they were perched together in a tree. I have attached the shot.

Tim Corner

Feb 112017
 

On Feb. 10 at 1:30 pm, I was putting on my skis at the Kawartha Nordic Ski Club (Haultain). Something big caught my eye. A mature Bald Eagle flew right over the training flats. It was easy to see the white head and tail with my bare eyes.

Marilyn Freeman

Bald Eagle (Karl Egressy)

Bald Eagle – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

 

Feb 042017
 

Yesterday morning (Feb. 3), we saw a Bald Eagle perched on a post south of Lakefield on the shore of the Otonabee River. We thought it might be a Golden Eagle or immature Bald Eagle. On our way home, we drove along the same stretch and saw the first bird with two others… a mature Bald Eagle and another younger one. We thought the younger ones could have been different ages since one’s plumage was closer to that of an adult than the first bird’s. Quite a sight…   (N.B.  left to right, there is a 1st winter, a 4th winter, and an adult plumage birdTim Dyson)
There were also three Trumpeter Swans on the same part of the river.

Gwen Forsyth, Lakefield

Immature Bald Eagle 2 – Otonabee R. – Feb. 3, 2017 – Gwen Forsyth

(L to R) 1st winter, 4th winter and adult Bald Eagle  – Otonabee R. – Feb. 3, 2017 – Gwen Forsyth

Trumpeter Swans – Otonabee River – Feb. 3, 2017 – Gwen Forsyth

Jan 232017
 

On Jan. 22, from my backyard, I  saw 8 Bald Eagles. They were on open ice south of Campbellford on the Trent River  There was one pair of adults and 6 immatures.

Donald Munro

Adult Bald Eagles – Jan. 24, 2015 – Lock 24 – Tom Northey

Immature Bald Eagle – Otonabee River – Feb. 2016 – Nima Taghaboni

 

Dec 202016
 

Today was a really productive day on the River Road. We spotted a female Wood Duck around the buoy just north of Trent University. An adult and an immature Bald Eagle were on the ice at Lock 25. The adult was feeding on a fish. They flew off, the immature heading south and the adult flying north with another adult. Spectacular site. We also saw a few Common Goldeneyes along the way.We then followed a Common Loon from the Lakefield Marina down to the entrance to the power plant  south of the bridge.
Sue Paradisis

Common Loon - Lakefield - Dec. 19, 2016 - Sue Paradisis

Common Loon – Lakefield – Dec. 19, 2016 – Sue Paradisis

 

Bald Eagles on Otonabee River eating a carp - Dec. 19, 2016 - Sue Paradisis

Bald Eagles on Otonabee River eating a carp – Dec. 19, 2016 – Sue Paradisis

Dec 182016
 

I received an email from Gwen McMullen in Warsaw.  Her son, Sandy,  works at the Unimin Mine and lives on the Galesburg South Road. He drives to work along County Road #6 to the mine. On November 28, he emailed his mom, saying: “I was seeing groups of eagles all day. 2 to 4 at a time. Over the 5 mile road I travel I was seeing them it seemed everywhere. I figured it must have been the same group traveling. Late afternoon I went on the tailings dam and surprised maybe 20 plus in one group. I estimated 8 mature Bald Eagles with white heads. There may have been Golden Eagles as well. The dark ones were very large compared to the white heads. You would think there was a salmon run on! Just sharing.”

Sandy McMullen, Galesburg South Road

Juvenile Golden Eagle - USFWS

Juvenile Golden Eagle – USFWS

Bald Eagle (Karl Egressy)

Bald Eagle (Karl Egressy)

Nov 172016
 

I saw a mature Bald Eagle last night, September 10, flying over our cottage. It was just above the trees so very close. I’m on the north shore of Stoney Lake, near Viamede Resort. It’s the first one I’ve seen in many years (last saw one at a nest near Davis Island).

Please note that the eagle nest near Davis Island is no longer active. We have friends whose cottage is across from the once nest. My recollection is that the nest came down a few winters ago.

Corey Goldman

Bald Eagle - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Bald Eagle – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

 

Aug 312016
 

I live on the Otonabee River between locks 24 & 25, and saw a pair of what I believe were Merlins flying over our yard Wednesday evening, August 24. Both of them had the shape of small falcons. I got a good look only at the brownish one when it landed on a cedar tree, but the markings looked unmistakable (definitely not a kestrel).

This is a fabulous place to live. We’re on the end of the road, so we have the river, but also mixed forest across the river and overgrown fields on two sides, one of which also has wetland, so we get a wonderful variety of birds. We had an American Bittern gullunking all spring, as well as Bobolinks in the fields. Also regularly see a Northern Harrier and American Kestrels, sometimes Red-tailed Hawks… and now Merlins. We also have loons as well as a pair of Baltimore Orioles, who, judging by the number of fledglings, had two clutches this year. Oh, and Bald Eagles in the winter. Who could ask for anything more?

Annamarie Beckel
writer ~ editor ~ ecologist

www.annamariebeckel.com

 

 

Bobolink - Wikimedia

Bobolink – Wikimedia

Baltimore Oriole on hummingbird feeder - Doug Gibson

Baltimore Oriole on hummingbird feeder – Doug Gibson

American Bittern - by Don Pettypiece

American Bittern – by Don Pettypiece

Merlin (Karl Egressy)

Merlin (Karl Egressy)

Jun 212016
 

I went out early both Saturday and Sunday (June 18 and 19, 2016) on Lower Buckhorn lake and took these pictures.

Robin Blake

Wild Rose - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Wild Rose – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

White Admiral -June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

White Admiral -June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

White Admiral -June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake (9)

White Admiral -June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake (9)

Slaty Skimmer - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Slaty Skimmer – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Osprey - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Osprey – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Northern Water Snake - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Northern Water Snake – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Four-spotted Skimmer - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Four-spotted Skimmer – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Eastern Kingbird - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Eastern Kingbird – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Canada Geese - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Canada Geese – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Blue Flag - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Blue Flag – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Bald Eagle - June 18-19, 2016 - Lower Buckhorn Lake - Robin Blake

Bald Eagle – June 18-19, 2016 – Lower Buckhorn Lake – Robin Blake

Jun 042016
 

Just an update related to my earlier Whooping Crane sighting.  I met a fellow from the MNR who, on Friday May 20, saw a Whooping Crane spiraling above the Beer Store in Peterborough (two weeks to the day after my sighting). His name is Scott Poser.

Also there are two nesting pairs of Bald Eagles on Buckhorn lake. One on Joe’s Island and one on Flat Island. The eagles moved to Joe’s Island 2 or 3 years ago, then a new pair took over Flat Island just this spring. The two nests are about 1 kilometre from each other. There may be more in the area, I haven’t been out on the lake yet. Those are just the nests that I can see from my house.

David Beaucage Johnson

Note: This makes for at least five Bald Eagle nests in the Kawarthas, including nests on Stony, Katchewanooka and the Trent River. I suspect there are more. D.M.

Whooping Crane in flight - Wikimedia

Whooping Crane in flight – Wikimedia

Bald Eagle nest on Stony Lake (photo by Jeff Jones)

Bald Eagle nest on Stony Lake (photo by Jeff Jones)

Apr 082016
 

We returned to our home on Dodworth Island on Stony Lake on Monday and immediately filled the four feeders. The activity is the most ever….We have 10 usual species but two things stand out. There are no Common Redpolls, but we have over 50 Pine Siskins. At least one Osprey is back..no loons here yet. The ice went out on April 1.  Rob Welsh

NOTE:  Pine Siskins are showing up in large numbers all over Peterborough and the Kawarthas right now. Flocks of 60+ have come to our feeder in recent days, along with close to a dozen Purple Finches. Drew Monkman

I was about to send out an APB. However, this evening around 5 pm. our pair of Common Loons finally arrived (Buckhorn Lake near Six Foot Bay) . Unfortunately, our “lone loon”, who usually arrives before them (as early as April 1) hasn’t appeared yet. Fingers crossed he’s ok.  Toni Sinclair, Buckhorn Lake

On April 6, I had 12-15 Purple Finches at our feeder for most of the day. No, they were not House Finches! Mostly females but at least 4 showy males.   Jim Cashmore, Wallis Drive, Peterborough

I heard the first Spring Peeper chorus for me this year, on March 31 @ 9th Line and County Road 32 (east bank along Otonabee towards Lakefield). Susan Chow

I saw my first Mourning Cloak butterfly on March 27,  just south of Keene.  Michael Gillespie

On the Indian River outside Warsaw, we heard an Eastern Phoebe calling March 28 at about 8:30 am – our harbinger of Spring!  Jane Bremner, Warsaw

Jerry Ball and I covered some of the side roads off Hwy 507 in the northern part of Trent Lakes Municipality and found Compton Tortoiseshell butterflies on three different roads. Martin Parker

We’ve had a weasel around all winter (a Long-tailed, we think), but never managed to get a photo until Easter Sunday, March 23… its white winter coat has started changing. Gwen Forsyth, Lakefield

I saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes on March 23. They were flying northeast over Centre Line of Smith at the 7th Line.  Jim Watt, Peterborough

I was outside March 23 cleaning the snow off the deck and about 20 feet above my head flew this magnificent adult Bald Eagle. He went upwards and landed on top of the pine tree on our point. Waited there for about ten minutes.  Derry Fairweather, Upper Buckhorn Lake

Today, March 22, my wife saw a pair of Gray Squirrels mating in our yard. It seems far too late, since Gray Squirrels give birth to their first litter this month. I haven’t been able to find a reference to mating in March anywhere online. Drew Monkman

Bald Eagle - March 23, 2016 Derry Fairweather

Bald Eagle – March 23, 2016 Derry Fairweather

Compton Tortoiseshell - Wikimedia

Compton Tortoiseshell – Wikimedia

Long-tailed Weasel - March 23 - Gwen Forsyth

Long-tailed Weasel – March 23 – Gwen Forsyth

Mourning Cloak - Maple Cr. - Apr. 2014 - Drew Monkman

Mourning Cloak – Maple Cr. – Apr. 2014 – Drew Monkman

 

Pine Siskin (by Karl Egressy)

Pine Siskin (by Karl Egressy)

Eastern Phoebe at nest - David Frank

Eastern Phoebe at nest – David Frank

 

Feb 072016
 

We spotted Bald Eagles (adult and immature) along the shoreline of the Otonabee River, just south of Lakefield, on two consecutive days. We also came across a flock of Bohemian Waxwings picking off the fruit from apple trees along the 15th line of Selwyn Township.

Immature Bald Eagle - Otonabee River - Feb. 2016 - Nima Taghaboni

Immature Bald Eagle – Otonabee River – Feb. 2016 – Nima Taghaboni

Bohemian Waxwings - Feb. 2016 -  Nima Taghaboni

Bohemian Waxwings – Feb. 2016 – Nima Taghaboni

Nima Taghaboni

Jan 132016
 

It has taken me 70 years, but today (Jan. 7) was the first time that I have seen both a Bald and Golden Eagle in the same morning. The Bald Eagle that I saw yesterday in the adjacent cornfield to my farm was back to savage the frozen small carcass this morning. An hour later, I went east to the Birdsall Line to look for the Golden that was seen feasting on a small dead deer in a bean field. It wasn’t there so I continued south towards Rice Lake in case there was open water. Just before the road ending, I saw my friend who had reported the sighting yesterday. As we stood talking, the Golden slowly flew over us, disappearing over the trees a few fields away. The carcass of the deer wasn’t there, probably having been pulled into the bush by coyotes. So, my chance sighting of the Golden was most fortuitous, but without the carcass / bait one would be lucky to see it again.

Michael Gillespie, Keene

Bald Eagle on deer carcass - Val Roberts

Bald Eagle on deer carcass – Val Roberts

Golden Eagle (3rd winter bird) Tim Dyson

Golden Eagle (3rd winter bird) Tim Dyson

Jan 022016
 

We had a sighting of a Virginia Opossum in mid-November 2015 near Bailieboro. It was a large animal and a white-grey shade in colour. Also, on December 30 2015, we had an immature Bald Eagle in our tree overlooking a small inlet off of Rice Lake. The bird seems to be hanging around the area.

Esther Ross, Rice Lake near Bailieboro

Opossum - Mary Beth Aspinall - Feb. 2014

Opossum – Mary Beth Aspinall – Feb. 2014

Immature Bald Eagle - Curve Lake - Drew Monkman

Immature Bald Eagle – Curve Lake – Drew Monkman

Dec 312015
 

I spotted this Bald Eagle flying over the south end of Chemong Lake this morning. Just a while ago, he reappeared with a fresh kill and landed on the shell ice to eat it. He was a bit far up from our shoreline so the pictures aren’t the best…..but a nice sighting none the less.

Nancy Cafik

Bald Eagle 2 - Chemong - Dec. 31, 2015 - Nancy Cafik

Bald Eagle 2 – Chemong – Dec. 31, 2015 – Nancy Cafik

Bald Eagle - Chemong - Dec. 31, 2015 - Nancy Cafik

Bald Eagle – Chemong – Dec. 31, 2015 – Nancy Cafik

Feb 032015
 

Yesterday, Feb. 2, at around 3 PM, I was driving on Hwy 28 to Northey’s Bay Road. Just after the big bend after Young’s Point, an immature Snowy Owl flew across the highway and off across a field. Shortly after and just before Northey’s Bay Road, I almost hit an immature Bald Eagle. It swooped down over the highway in front of me then banked and headed for my wind shield. It was so close I could clearly see its black head and eyes and beak. It pulled up and over the van just in time! Very exciting. Birding at home this winter has been very dull due to frequent and lengthy visits by a Cooper’s Hawk.
Sue Paradisis

Cooper's Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Cooper’s Hawk on bird it had captured (Karl Egressy)

Immature (juvenal) Bald Eagle - Drew Monkman

Immature (juvenal) Bald Eagle – Drew Monkman

Jan 282015
 

Yesterday, (January 27th), during a forty minute walk between Belmont Lake and Round Lake north of Havelock, I enjoyed a nice bit of eagling, (if that is indeed a word). First, along came a lovely 4th winter Bald Eagle at only about 150 m  above the ground. She flew right overhead, and headed north and out of my sight. A little while later, two perched ravens drew my attention to a fairly high 2nd winter Bald Eagle as it soared higher and higher, as the curious ravens stared at the ascending eagle. Not long after that, I was back home and sipping a coffee on the front porch when I spotted another eagle to the west. This bird, too, seemed quite high, and appeared  not to be soaring, but instead, looked to be “hanging” suspended by the stiff north breeze. Binoculars were only useful enough to be able to tell that it was a Golden Eagle, but it was not until I got the scope on it, that I could see that it was in fact an adult bird. It even hovered a couple of times, (not unlike a kestrel or Rough-legged Hawk often does). I have seen Goldens do this before, but not very often. It appeared to be actively hunting though, and remained in my sight for more than twenty minutes. It was doing what I refer to as a “staircase stoop”, in which with partly closed wings, the bird drops maybe fifty meters, then levels off again, then drops again, and then levels off once more. Too far away for photos, but plenty of fun to watch regardless. Despite another nice day today, a similar walk did not produce any eagles.

Tim Dyson, Cordova Lake

Bald Eagle - 4th winter - 27-01-15 - Tim Dyson

Bald Eagle – 4th winter – 27-01-15 – Tim Dyson

Adult Golden Eagle photographed at Petroglyph Provincial Park (Tim Dyson)

Adult Golden Eagle photographed at Petroglyph Provincial Park (Tim Dyson)

Jan 262015
 

I saw an adult Bald Eagle today, January 26, at  around 2:30 PM on County Road 32/River Road, near the entrance to Lakefield. The bird was soaring over the river. I was able to take several photos.

Scott Kendall

Bald Eagle - Jan. 26, 2015 - Scott Kendall

Bald Eagle – Jan. 26, 2015 – Scott Kendall

Dec 172014
 

On Sunday, December 14 at around noon, my wife spotted a couple of small White-tailed Deer as we drove along Northey’s Bay Road, north of Stony Lake. Later, she spotted two Bald Eagles on the 10th line of Selwyn Township at about 1:30 PM. There may even have been three birds. They were pretty far away.

Jeff Keller

White-tailed Deer - Northey's Bay Road - Jeff Keller

White-tailed Deer – Northey’s Bay Road – Dec. 2014 – Jeff Keller

Bald Eagle - Selwyn Township - Dec. 2014 - Jeff Keller

Bald Eagle – Selwyn Township – Dec. 2014 – Jeff Keller

Mar 262014
 
Woodland Drive Bald Eagle - Bill Astell

Woodland Drive Bald Eagle – Bill Astell

On March 21, my wife and I watched two adult Bald Eagles sitting on the ice in front of our house and eating a Mallard duck they had caught. A third eagle, an immature, arrived and tried unsuccessfully to join in on the meal. Recently, one of the eagles also caught and ate a feral cat. My wife and I have seen eagles take ducks here in past years, as well. We live on Cameron Street, just north of the Peterborough By-Pass bridge. There is always a great deal of waterfowl activity on this part of the river.

Bob Thompson, Cameron Street