Jan 042019
 

Hermit Thrush – I took this photo of a Hermit Thrush on January 19. It was feeding on Staghorn Sumac behind my house at Curve Lake First Nation. It is sometimes on the ground, in the branches of the spruce tree beside our house and in the sumac around the back woodshed. Feel free to let interested birders know. We are at the end of a long driveway. The thrush was still here as of January 20. Dave Johnson, 1010 Mississauga St, Curve Lake First Nation 

Hermit Thrush – January 19, 2019 – Curve Lake FN – Dave Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagles on Belmont Lake – I have a cottage on Belmont lake. We have been delighted to see soaring high above the lake a pair of Bald Eagles. For two years they have stayed close to the middle and northern sections of the lake, mostly fishing and being quite successful. I am sending you my two best shots taken from our boat, as we tried to follow yet keep a distance to not scare them away. I am also in contact with Tim Dyson, who tells me he spent several years near our lake, and spotted Bald Eagles in the winter months as well.  I have also sent the information to the MNR/NHIC to update their maps.  Julia Matys, Belmont Lake

Bald Eagle – Belmont Lake – summer 2018 – Julia Matys

Bald Eagle – Belmont Lake – summer 2017 – Julia Matys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evening Grosbeaks – As of January 4, we have had a nice flock of about 24 Evening Grosbeaks hanging around our back field and feeder. One appears to be without pigment (leucistic). They really love the sumac grove on the edge of the field. We have not had Evening Grosbeaks in our area before.           Gene de St. Croix, Sixth Line, Hastings 

Evening Grosbeaks. Note leucistic bird third from left – Gene de St. Croix

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagles and Trumpeter Swans – We live on Katchewanooka Lake and in the past two days (January 9-10) I’ve seen both mature and immature Bald Eagles – three times! Each time, the bird was perched off of the ice at our shoreline. I thought perhaps the immature Bald Eagle was actually a Golden Eagle, due to its colour and size, but since we have a family of Bald Eagles nesting on one of the islands nearby, I trust that these were all Bald Eagles. We’re very lucky and tend to see them fairly often this time of year! Eagles are one of my favourite birds, such big, beautiful creatures. I’ll try to be quicker with my camera next time and will hopefully snap a photo! I also saw 5 Trumpeter Swans two days ago – 2 adults and 3 immatures. I had never seen immatures here before! They meandered by our shoreline and then headed towards the group of birds off of a nearby island. Melissa Nagy, Katchewanooka Lake

Trumpeter Swans on Katchewanooka Lake in January 2019 – Melissa Nagy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pine Grosbeaks – On January 10-11, I had a dozen Pine Grosbeaks eating crabapples on the ground beneath the tree. Sue Paradisis, Peterborough

Pine Grosbeaks – January 10, 2019 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooper’s Hawk – On Nov 18, 2018, a flock of local Rock Pigeons was raiding our backyard feeder when a Cooper’s Hawk flew in at lightening speed. The frightened pigeons took off suddenly to escape, but one of them turned into a cloud of feathers and fell to the ground. The hawk came in so fast that I failed to see it until, in an instant, it was on the ground with the dying pigeon. It sat there for a few minutes, which allowed me to take pictures and watch it before it eventually flew off with the pigeon to a nearby tree to enjoy its warm meal.  Ed Lukaszewicz, Peterborough

Cooper’s Hawk on freshly-killed Rock Pigeon – Nov. 18, 2018 – Peterborough – Ed Lukaszewicz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) (1)
– Reported Jan 08, 2019 12:54 by C Douglas
– Rice Lake–Birdsalls Wharf, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Swan seen swimming in open water east of landing. Had black face pattern and orange coloured bill. Photo taken”

Mute Swan (photo: Drew Monkman)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Jan 08, 2019 11:57 by C Douglas
– Rice Lake–Hiawatha (Herkimer Point), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Large white bird on ice. Seen through scope ”

Snowy Owl in flight – Wendy Leszkowicz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1) CONFIRMED
– Reported Jan 05, 2019 07:25 by Colin Jones
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “On the trail to the Bennett Cabin. Photos taken.”

Black-backed Woodpecker – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) (2) CONFIRMED
– Reported Jan 05, 2019 07:25 by Colin Jones
– Kawartha Nordic Ski Club trails, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “At W end of PL Road at a location where I’ve seen Canada Jay in the past”

Canada (Gray) Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coyotes & Cooper’s Hawk – We had lots of Coyote activity last night (January 2). The pack went right through our back yard again – lots of communication going on. From the tracks in the snow it would appear to be about 5 or 6 animals. This morning we have a Cooper’s Hawk on the ground about 20 feet back into the bush on the PGCC golf course property having his breakfast. The Gray Squirrel is very interested in what is going on and has been within 5 ft of the hawk!  Jim Watt, Franmor Drive

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
– Reported Jan 03, 2019 16:25 by Scott Gibson
– Peterborough–Little Lake, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “female/imm type bird SW shore (cemetery side) across from Beavermead beach. Viewed from cemetary. Merganser with thin bill, gradual transition b/w breast and throat.”

Female Red-breasted Merganser (Karl Egressy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooper’s Hawk: Yesterday, I found the kill site of a Rock Pigeon at the side of my house. Although I hadn’t seen a Coopers Hawk for weeks, I figured it was still around, judging by how few birds had been coming to my feeders. Today, the hawk showed up and was around for hours. The squirrels were not impressed and a couple of them spent a lot of time harassing it to leave. Even a little Red Squirrel did a lot of scolding just 10 feet away. At some point in the morning when I wasn’t watching, it caught a pigeon and perched up in a spruce to eat. The squirrel chased it off so I now have a half eaten carcass decorating my tree.  Sue Paradisis, Tudor Cr., Peterborough

Cooper’s Hawk eating Mourning Dove – January 2018 – Sue Paradisis

 

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