Aug 102018
 
Great summer for Monarchs
In my opinion, this is the best year for Monarchs in the last half dozen.
Michael Gillespie, David Fife Line, Keene

Monarch on Buddleia (butterfly bush) at Millennium Park – photo by Ben Wolf

 

 

 

 

 

Sightings from the Indian River near Warsaw
Sightings have been fairly quiet this summer but August is proving much more interesting.  And an update on the House Wren’s nest in the hanging basket.  The couple raised two offspring and the nest was empty by July 23.  One egg was punctured and did not hatch.  The eggs are so tiny.
August 5/6:
An Osprey has found a handy perch on a dead branch across the river and when we first saw it back on June 30 it was being harassed by a couple of Red-Winged Blackbirds, though the Osprey held its ground and is still using the perch occasionally.

August 8:  We discovered a large amount of fresh Otter scat and flattened grass abutting the open underside of our river deck.  Fresh stuff, and the odour was very strong!  We put out the Trail Camera, but so far nothing captured on film.  The scat is now dried out and is full of shell.

We also saw a female Scarlet Tanager spotted eating a Common Whitetail Dragonfly in a spruce close to the house. A Caspian Tern, gull-size with a bright orange/red beak, flew back and forth three times along our stretch of the Indian River, plunging four times into the water with no success, then continued flying down river.  Fascinating to watch!

August 9:  A female Belted Kingfisher dived into the river and emerged with what looked like a small bright orange disc-shaped something which it banged hard several times against a fallen dead tree branch, then returned to its higher perch to continue surveying the river.  I have no idea what the “disc” was.

August 13/14:  Our first migrating Yellow-rumped Warbler looking for insects in a large White Pine.
Stephenie Armstrong

Osprey – Indian River – August 2018 – Stephenie Armstrong

Otter scat – Indian River – August 2018 – Stephenie Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juvenile Rose-breasted Grosbeak at north end feeder in Peterborough

I had a juvenile male Rose-breasted Grosbeak on my feeder today. First time I’ve seen a young grosbeak, so I didn’t recognize it as this species. Quite different from the adult male or adult female.  Margo Hughes, Peterborough 

Immature male Rose-breasted Grosbeak – August 14, 2018 – Ptbo – Margo Hughes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coyotes and possible Red Fox kits on Kawartha Golf and Country Club property

Had a great sighting today, as well as an audio. Both of these events happened on the Kawartha Golf and Country Club property. I’m not a golfer but often walk their driveway as part of my morning walk.
     The first was a sighting last Tuesday, August 7. As I started up the driveway from Clonsilla, I glanced up the fairway to my left and noticed two kittens playing about 150 yards away. As I stood there another joined them, then another and another and so on. This continued as more came. Some returned then disappeared again making it difficult to count, but I would guess 12 to 15 were there at a time. I mentioned this to a groundskeeper and was told because of the Coyotes there were no cats on the grounds, so he thought they were probably young Coyotes. The problem, however, is that all were light tan or beige in colour so I think they were Red Fox kits.
    The audio happened today, August 15, and sent chills up my spine. While walking up the driveway, I heard a sound of probably a police car using its siren in a short beeping sort of way. No sooner had it stopped when a large pack of Coyotes began to howl. It was quite unnerving. These Coyotes were behind me near the entrance. When it ceased another pack in front of me began howling. It also seemed to be large and now I was in the between the two with a hiking pole as my protection.
    While on the driveway I have seen many singular Coyotes watching me watching them but never a pack and today, there two packs. A good way to begin the day don’t you think!  Don Finigan

Coyotes in field on Stewart Line (Randy Therrien)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus) (1)
– Reported Aug 09, 2018 09:32 by Peterborough County Birds Database
– Otonabee Gravel Pit Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Media: 1 Photo

Semipalmated Plover – Wikimedia

Olive-sided Flycatcher – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) (1)
– Reported Aug 09, 2018 13:23 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Warsaw Caves Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) (1)
– Reported Aug 03, 2018 17:30 by Martin Parker
– Stony Lake–Mount Julian-Viamede Resort, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “small tern. much smaller than Caspian Terns”

Common Tern – Wikimedia

Bay-breasted Warbler – Wikimedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bay-breasted Warbler (Setophaga castanea) (1)
– Reported Aug 09, 2018 08:13 by Iain Rayner
– Peterborough–Millennium Park, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Looked to be a non breeding adult male. Seen well through binos from 20 ft. Greenish yellowish face with faint eyestripe and arcs around eye, heavily streaked green back, smooth buff/greenish underparts with visible chestnut flanks. Two bold white wing bars and white edged tertials. Based on migrant warblers I have seen locally in the last week…I would say all warblers are fair game now.”

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