Drew Monkman

I am a retired teacher, naturalist and writer with a love for all aspects of the natural world, especially as they relate to seasonal change.

Jun 242017
 

On Jun 23, 2017, at 9:23 PM, Scott Gibson via ONTBIRDS <birdalert@ontbirds.ca> wrote:

The Dickcissel invasion has extended to the Kawarthas! This afternoon around 4:50, Iain Rayner found a male Dickcissel just north of Fowlers Corners (NW of Peterborough) @ 1203 Frank Hill Rd (County of Kawartha Lakes). It was sitting on the hydro wire across from the laneway into house #1203.

I went and had a look this evening and found it in the same spot. It was singing from variety spots…hydro lines, fence posts, shrubs…giving great views! Pics can be found in my ebird report.

From Highway 115, go north on Hwy 7/28 approx 10km to Fowlers Corners. Continue north on Frank Hill Rd approx. 3km.

Cheers,
Scott Gibson

Dickcissel – by RebelAt at English Wikipedia

________

Jun 242017
 

The tent caterpillar activity is quite evident in the Millbrook area this year, but at our summer home near Bon Echo Provincial Park, the damage done by Forest Tent Caterpillars is devastating. In many areas up to 80% of the canopy on elms and maples has been devoured.

Ralph & Elaine Cole, Millbrook

Forest Tent Caterpillar (separated “snowmen” down the back) – Wikimedia

Forest Tent Caterpillar defoliation of aspens – Government of Manitoba

Forest Tent Caterpillar defoliation (photo: State University of New York – Cortland)

Jun 242017
 

We have a sweet smelling Abelia shrub that is proving to be very popular with the insect population. Visitors this month include our first and so far only Monarch, a Black Swallowtail, a White Admiral, and two hawk moths, including the Hummingbird Clearwing and the Snowberry Clearwing, the latter new to us. And out amongst the wildflowers, the Canada Tiger Swallowtail is regularly feeding on the Viper’s Bugloss. I was able to photograph them all except the Monarch, with two separate views of the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth.

On June 8th, Peter got a bit of a surprise opening the door to our under-deck to find an Eastern Milksnake coiled around one of the garden hoses. He was lucky to get a photo as it made its way along the line of stopcocks heading for a bit of cover under the stairs.

Stephenie Armstrong, Warsaw

Eastern Milksnake – Peter Armstrong

Snowberry Clearwing at Abelia shrub – Stephenie Armstrong – June 2017

Hummingbird Clearwing at Abelia shrub – Stephenie Armstrong

 

Canada Tiger Swallowtail on Viper Bugloss – Stephenie Armstrong

Jun 242017
 

Sedge Wren (Sedge) (Cistothorus platensis stellaris) (2)
– Reported Jun 24, 2017 07:41 by Luke Berg
– Miller Creek Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3866915,-78.3501577&ll=44.3866915,-78.3501577
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37767801

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (2)
– Reported Jun 21, 2017 09:42 by Peterborough County Birds Database
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37727497

Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) (1)
– Reported Jun 21, 2017 06:50 by Peter Burke
– 415–457 County Road 36, Galway-Cavendish and Harvey CA-ON (44.5749,-78.5157), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.574884,-78.515671&ll=44.574884,-78.515671
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37717358

Upland Sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) (1)
– Reported Jun 21, 2017 17:30 by Milda Bax
– home, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4162641,-78.0171239&ll=44.4162641,-78.0171239
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37734578

Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) (1)
– Reported Jun 18, 2017 08:30 by John Bick
– Deer Bay Reach Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5740226,-78.2863426&ll=44.5740226,-78.2863426
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37732313
– Comments: “Heard vocalizing in deciduous treetops over the course of 30 minutes at 155 where previously reported.”

Upland Sandpiper by Greg Piasetzki

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – Greg Piasetzki

Sedge Wren perched in a dogwood in the Carden Alvar – Greg Piasetzki

Jun 192017
 

I photographed this Showy Lady’s-slipper near Omemee on June 18.  Trudy Gibson

Showy Lady’s-slipper – Omemee – June 18, 2017 – Trudy Gibson

 

These Showy Lady’s-slippers are blooming (June 17) behind my house in Havelock, near the creek. Ulrike Kullik

Showy Lady’s-slipper – Havelock – June 17, 2017 – Ulrike Kullik

 

Showy Lady’s-slippers – June 17, 2017 – Ulrike Kullik

 

Jun 172017
 

I found this plant in the O’Hara Mill Homestead and Conservation Area near Madoc. It caught my attention last fall because of the interesting seed head. Do you have any idea what species it is?

Ulrike Kullik, Havelock

Note:  According to Mike McMurtry, a local ecologist and botanist, this is an Orange-fruited Horse-gentian (Triosteum aurantiacum).  It is a native species that grows in rich deciduous woods but is not common. As the picture shows, it has opposite broad leaves and dark red/purplish/brown flowers in leaf the axils. It is closely related to Wild Coffee (Triosteum perfoliatum). I was not aware of this plant before. D.M.

Orange-fruited Horse-gentian – O’Hara Mills C.A. – Madoc – June 12, 2017 – Ulrike Kullik

Orange-fruited Horse-gentian 2- O’Hara Mills C.A. – Madoc – June 12, 2017 – Ulrike Kullik

 

Jun 172017
 

On June 14, while sitting in my screened room in Millbrook, this moth plummeted down from the heavens and landed on the table beside me. I have no idea where he came from. Perhaps he was sleeping along the rafter and fell(?) I thought he was dead. After looking at him for about 10 minutes I lifted him up onto a piece of cardboard. He held on to the edges of the board. I went outside and he eventually walked/flew over to the screen, climbed up a few inches and stayed there for several hours. At dark I went out to see him and he was gone.
He was about 3 inches long, and his head and back looked almost like fur! Do you have any idea what this is?

Bev Hawkins

Note: Basil Conlin, a local moth expert, has identified it as a Laurel Sphinx (Sphinx kalmiae). “This species loves to feed on ash and lilac as a caterpillar and will nectar at deep flowers as an adult. They are lovely! As far as I know they do not fly during the day. I usually find the adults at lights in two batches: first right at dusk, then again after midnight.”

Laurel Sphinx (Sphinx kalmiae) June 14, 2017 – Millbrook – Bev Hawkins

Jun 172017
 

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (4)
– Reported Jun 16, 2017 10:15 by Martin Parker
– David Fife Liner – south end & Gillepie feeder, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2580292,-78.133918&ll=44.2580292,-78.133918
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37632606
– Media: 1 Photo

Cliff Swallow building nest – Wikimedia

Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) (1)
– Reported Jun 16, 2017 07:50 by Iain Rayner
– Deer Bay Reach Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5740226,-78.2863426&ll=44.5740226,-78.2863426
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37630398
– Comments: “Singing near “155 fresh eggs””

Cerulean Warbler (Karl Egressy)

Jun 022017
 

Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) (1)
– Reported Jun 01, 2017 14:50 by Scott Gibson
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37313046
– Comments: “female. south cell”

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) (1)
– Reported May 29, 2017 13:00 by Kathryn Sheridan
– Lakefield Water Tower, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4160495,-78.2822227&ll=44.4160495,-78.2822227
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37318670
– Comments: “The bird was making a rattle sound sort of like a kingfisher. It was repeatedly diving downwards to catch something and then flying back up to its high perch. There are no bodies of water nearby so I didn’t think it could be a kingfisher. I didn’t have my binoculars with me, so I couldn’t discern colour in the light as it was, but I could see very prominent white wing patches. There was something interesting about the head, but I couldn’t quite put my finger on what it was.”

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) (1)
– Reported May 31, 2017 08:45 by Peter Burke
– CA-ON-Galway-Cavendish and Harvey (44.5693,-78.3302), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8

&t=p&z=13&q=44.569271,-78.330191&ll=44.569271,-78.330191
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37295581

Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius spurius) (1)
– Reported May 30, 2017 20:09 by Luke Berg
– CA-ON-Peterborough – LHT b/w Dillon Rd and Redmond Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.27021,-78.25818&ll=44.27021,-78.25818
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37277093
– Comments: “Singing male. ”

Red-headed Woodpecker – May 28, 2017 – Buckhorn Lake -Nima Taghaboni

Immature male Orchard Oriole – Wikimedia

Jun 012017
 

It was the Kirtland’s warbler that made our morning. In the red cedar ten metres off the trail, the small grey and yellow bird was all but invisible. Only when it flitted from one branch to another was there any chance of seeing it – and it didn’t flit often. The small group that first spotted the bird had swollen to a hundred birders or more as word of North America’s rarest warbler spread almost instantaneously along the trails. Patience, however, eventually paid off as the bird flew up onto an exposed branch, sat cooperatively in the open and sang its heart out for all to see and hear. There are two spring migrations at Point Pelee National Park: the birds themselves and the people from all over Canada, the U.S. and even Europe who flock to see them.

The Kirtland’s warbler finally agreed to show itself – Greg Piasetzki

Located near Leamington, Point Pelee is a peninsula that extends into the western basin of Lake Erie. It is located at the crossroads of two major migration routes – the Mississippi and Atlantic Flyways. Most importantly, it is one of the first points of land that spring migrants reach after crossing Lake Erie at night. Approximately 385 different species of birds have been recorded here, including 42 of the 55 regularly occurring North American warblers.

To see the greatest diversity of warblers and other songbirds such as vireos, flycatchers, grosbeaks, tanagers and thrushes, the first three weeks of May is the time to visit the park. The birds are in their brightest breeding plumage and most species are singing. They are also relatively easy to see, since the trees leaf out later here, due to the cooling effect of Lake Erie. Anyone going to Point Pelee for the first time will be amazed at how easy it is to see spectacular birds like rose-breasted grosbeaks, Baltimore orioles, indigo buntings, red-headed woodpeckers and scarlet tanagers. Seeing a trio of male tanagers lighting up a trailside tree can be just as pleasurable as getting a fleeting glimpse of a rarity, skulking on the ground in a tangle of vines.The most spectacular birding occurs when weather fronts collide, forcing migrants down out of the sky in what is called a “fallout”. When this happens, you’ll need at least three pairs of eyes. One pair focused on the birds down low on the ground or in the shrubbery, another to check out what’s moving through the treetops and a third to keep track of birds streaming overhead!

Visitors to Point Pelee in May are almost guaranteed to see magnificent scarlet tanagers – Greg Piasetzki

Red-headed woodpeckers were more common than usual this year – Greg Piatsetzki

Once again this year, I made my annual pilgrimage to Point Pelee with friends Jim Cashmore, Mitch Brownstein, Brian Wales, Greg Piasetzki and Clayton Vardy. When we arrived on May 10 after a five and a half hour drive, early migrants like sparrows and kinglets were still much in evidence. A nice surprise, however, was getting close-up views of at least eight black-throated blue warblers. Over the course of the week, new species arrived daily, especially when a flow of air from the south provided a tail wind.

(L to R) Jim Cashmore, Greg Piasetzki, Brian Wales, Mitch Brownstein & Drew Monkman

Carolinian zone

Although we’ve been going to Pelee for years, it’s always exciting to become reacquainted with species we rarely see in the Kawarthas. These include orchard orioles, white-eyed vireos, yellow-breasted chats, Carolina wrens, blue-gray gnatcatchers, prothonotary warblers and rarer birds like summer tanagers. The Carolinian forest, too, is quite different with abundant hackberry trees interspersed with eastern redbud, Chinquapin oak, sassafras, shagbark hickory and American sycamore. Many of the trees support huge vines of wild grape, Virginia creeper and especially poison ivy. The latter are easily identifiable by the numerous hairs that anchor the thick stems to the trunk. The forest floor is covered with wide diversity of flowers like sweet cicely, spring beauty, appendaged waterleaf and invasive garlic mustard.

An eastern redbud in full bloom – Drew Monkman

Pelee offers a wide range of wildflowers in May – Drew Monkman

Sightings board at the Visitors Centre at Point Pelee – Drew Monkman

Festival of Birds

Every May, the Friends of Point Pelee organize the Festival of Birds. This year’s festival featured birding and wildflower hikes, twilight hikes, photography walks and a shorebird celebration at nearby Hillman Marsh Conservation Area. Here, volunteers like Jean Irons explained the basics of sandpiper and plover identification. There were also special presentations on everything from warbler and sparrow ID to learning to bird by ear. A welcoming touch this year was the free admission to the Park as part of the Canada 150 celebration. The Friends also host a very popular birder’s breakfast and lunch.

Birders lined up for lunch, courtesy of the Friends of Point Pelee – Drew Monkman

Birders at Pelee take regular breaks at the visitors centre, where naturalists are on hand to answer questions and give suggestions as to where to go. You can also consult the sightings board to see where species of special interest have been observed that day. Quite often, the birds remain in the same area for hours or even days. You will also find a great bookstore and displays set up by various groups like Quest Nature Tours and the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

Highlights

Each year offers a different mix of highlights. This year, great views of prothonotary warblers was one of them. On the Woodland Trail at Pelee and then again on the Tulip Tree Trail at Rondeau, we watched as they searched for food along the edge of wooded swamps. Their brilliant orange-yellow head and blue-gray wings produced a non-stop chorus of “wow!” from the appreciative birders. At one point, a spectacular male was hopping around at people’s feet. Photographers couldn’t stop clicking.

Point Pelee is a photographer’s delight with spectacular species like prothonotary warblers – Greg Piasetzki

Other memories that made the spring of 2017 special were the hundreds of northbound blue jays streaming overhead; the great views of spectacular male warblers like the northern parula, the blackburnian and the blue-winged; a tired and hungry scarlet tanager foraging in a pile of rocks and oblivious to the crowd only metres away; the chestnut-sided warbler that briefly landed on Mitch’s shoulder;  an American woodcock and its chicks feeding along a muddy trail; observing orioles and grosbeaks building their nests; the tom turkeys displaying to females with tail fanned and body feathers puffed out; a winter wren pouring out its ridiculously long, 132-note song; a black-billed and yellow-billed cuckoo perched side by side in a tree just metres overhead; the abundance of wood thrushes, Swainson’s thrushes and veerys; and getting great views of the subtle differences between similar species like Forster’s terns and common terns and American golden plovers and black-bellied plovers.

A yellow-billed cuckoo perched only metres overhead – Greg Piasetzki

Turkey vulture perched on the cross of the Catholic church at Rondeau – Drew Monkman

Birding’s allure

Despite the thousands of people in the Park and the sometimes-congested trails, birders show an unwavering respect for the birds and for fellow birdwatchers. Rarely do people speak in a loud voice or push their way past others. It’s not unusual to be surrounded by a dozen other birders but to still feel you have the silence of the woods to yourself. It’s also wonderful to be in the company of so many people of similar interests, to chat with visitors from all over North America and the United Kingdom and to be part of the instantaneous “sightings grapevine” in which birders share the location of sought-after species. People also help each other with identification problems and love to share what species are just ahead on the trail.

All eyes were trained on an elusive Kirtlands’s warbler – Drew Monkman

Pelee also reminds me each year of why birding is so appealing. At its essence, bird-watching is an exercise in focused awareness. Yes, at one level, it is a hobby, but it is also a powerful means of developing mindfulness. When you are fully focused on finding, identifying or simply watching a given bird, it is possible to live entirely in the moment as your senses completely take over and any intrusive thoughts are swept away. There is so much information for your senses to take in: the beauty, numbers and diversity of the bird themselves, the rich orchestra of different songs, the smell of the spring air and the warmth of the May sun. By learning to see, listen, smell and feel, birding teaches us to enjoy all that our senses have to offer. There is also great satisfaction in drawing upon your knowledge of habitat, time of year, song, behaviour and field marks to make an identification. Sometimes, however, you just don’t know. This is especially true for look-alike birds like many of the vireos and flycatchers.

Personally, I try to focus my attention on bird song. It provides an almost instantaneous picture of the diversity of species present as well as the number of individual birds. The soundscape at Pelee and Rondeau is dominated by the voices of Baltimore orioles, yellow warblers and red-winged blackbirds. The challenge, however, is to coax your brain to push these more common sounds into the background, so that the voices of less common species can be detected. This year, the flute-like song of the wood thrush stood out all week long and was beautiful to hear.

A wood thrush on the Tulip Tree Trail at Rondeau – Drew Monkman

When we left Point Pelee, we headed east to Rondeau Provincial Park near Blenheim. A stop at the town’s sewage lagoon provided great views of shorebirds, five species of swallows and numerous ruddy ducks. Rondeau offers a quiet counterbalance to Pelee’s frenzy. The birding can be almost as good, but there are far fewer visitors. It is also a botanist’s delight with spectacular tulip trees, diverse wildflowers and intriguing ferns. The visitors centre provides many of the same services as at Pelee but on a smaller scale. It also has a busy array of feeders that provide great photo opportunities. A visit to either – or both – of these parks is no less than a celebration of a southern Ontario spring.

If you plan to go next year, book now. Accommodation can be especially difficult to find in the Point Pelee area. For visitor information, go to festivalofbirds.ca

 

 

 

May 312017
 

I had to let you know. When I pulled into camp on Saturday, guess who came in for a visit?……Stanley! A few battle scars around his face but otherwise he looks great. The other campers remarked that the gulls have not returned to our part of the lake yet, but here he is! When I threw him his favourite treat he let out a squeal …..I hope of delight.

Barb Evett, Woodland Campsite, Lakehurst

Stanley, May 2017 – Barb Evett

May 312017
 

Did you, as a kid, see Hitchcock’s “The Birds”? We our having a “Birds” experience ourselves. The Ruffed Grouse at the cottage that began following us (and our dog, Toby) around last summer has turned nasty! A day or so ago, he started by fluttering at Toby’s head from point blank range. Next, he whacked Sandy from behind. He then whacked me from behind twice; the second time was from a long distance – he really dive bombed me. I can tell you it is a surprise when a grouse swoops in unbeknownst and hits the back of your head! Then, last evening, Sandy sat down in the sun room and the bird tried to get at her head, but luckily the storm window intervened. This guy is demented.

We have chased him, pushed him with long sticks, and he just walks away, but then returns immediately.

It may be necessary to relocate him. If he gets close enough, I think I can throw a cardboard box over him and take him for a looooooong drive. Do you want us to bring him to your home in Peterborough?

Rob and Sandy Moos, Parry Sound

Ruffed Grouse – Parry Sound – via Rob Moos

May 312017
 

It was an interesting couple of days this past weekend at Woodland Campsite near Lakehurst for sightings.

A pair of Trumpeter Swans can be seen daily in the Sandy Creek Bay area. They are possibly nesting in the wetlands just south of the park. The camp owner managed to take photos last October of the mated pair and their two cygnets. Both adults are tagged (one tag is yellow with black numbers M87). The other one has not been identified yet.

A Red Fox (lean but healthy looking) ran past my trailer. This is the first one we have seen in the area in years.

I suddenly realized I was hearing a sound I love……. Common Ravens!! The nasally grunk of the raven went on for a few minutes. Then the sound was closer. Overhead, a family of four ravens flew over the camp, one raven calling during the flight. I had seen one last year……but now I believe they must be nesting in the area…….exciting!

Barb Evett

Common Raven – Wikimedia

May 262017
 

– Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (1 report)
– Cliff Swallow (4 reports)
– Sedge Wren (1 report)
– Golden-winged Warbler (1 report)
– Blue-winged Warbler (1 report)
– Cape May Warbler (1 report)

———————————————
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Needs Alert for Peterborough County.The report below shows observations of species you have not seen in Peterborough County, based on your eBird observations. View or unsubscribe to this alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN34560
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 11:33 by Donald A. Sutherland
– CA-ON-Galway-Cavendish and Harvey-2378-2442 Charlie Allen Rd – 44.6462x-78.3916, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.646226,-78.391596&ll=44.646226,-78.391596
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37113123

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 17:29 by Iain Rayner
– Miller Creek Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3866915,-78.3501577&ll=44.3866915,-78.3501577
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37127129

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (12)
– Reported May 23, 2017 11:55 by Erica Nol
– Otonabee River North of Faryon Bridge, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3603104,-78.2895184&ll=44.3603104,-78.2895184
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37119763

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (16)
– Reported May 24, 2017 07:55 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37109708
– Comments: “collecting mud at edge of parking lot at Trailhead”

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (3)
– Reported May 23, 2017 15:25 by Brittany Holmes
– trent bridge, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3582738,-78.2898322&ll=44.3582738,-78.2898322
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37125957

Cliff Swallow building nest – Wikimedia

Sedge Wren (Cistothorus platensis) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 17:29 by Iain Rayner
– Miller Creek Conservation Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3866915,-78.3501577&ll=44.3866915,-78.3501577
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37127129
– Comments: “Same location as previous years w of second brige. Barely audible in distance not singing as frequently as later in evening”

Sedge Wren – Wikimedia

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (2)
– Reported May 24, 2017 10:29 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Tates Bridge–Tates Rd at Miskwaa Ziibi (river), Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.64244,-78.40594&ll=44.64244,-78.40594
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37112322
– Media: 1 Photo

Male Golden-winged Warbler – Karl Egressy

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 06:10 by Jeff Stewart
– 621 Carveth Drive, Millbrook, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1354565,-78.4611087&ll=44.1354565,-78.4611087
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37108598
– Comments: “singing, cont. bird (?)”

Blue-winged Warbler – Wikimedia

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
– Reported May 24, 2017 07:55 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37109708

Cape May Warbler – Jeff Keller – May 5, 2015

May 212017
 

This past Tuesday, May 16, I got up early (6AM)….well early for me (I volunteer at the Turtle Trauma Centre and had a large recovered snapper to release in Orillia)…. threw open my drapes …..beautiful sunny morning……and thought someone had let their dog run free the other side of my fence…….wait, not a dog……a large, healthy Black Bear!!! This is the first bear I have ever seen in a natural setting!! My backyard is diagonal to the intersection of Fairbairn and Highland….so he came out of Jackson Park. Funny, I go to the trailer to see wildlife……but I probably see more here right in the city!

NOTE: Bears do enter Peterborough occasionally, but rarely hang around for more than a matter of hours. I’m not aware of anyone ever being attacked in one of these situations. The bears that very occasionally do attack (a handful of incidents across Ontario per year) are adult males in remote areas of Northern Ontario. It’s usually a bear that has never encountered humans before. Even mother bears with cubs rarely – if ever – attack. Why not? Because they don’t want to end up dead or injured and their cubs become orphaned and unable to survive on their own.   D.M.

Black Bear – Randy Therrien

May 212017
 

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (4)
– Reported May 20, 2017 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025248
– Media: 1 Photo

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (2)
– Reported May 20, 2017 09:50 by Bill Crins
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37019076
– Media: 2 Photos

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (5)
– Reported May 20, 2017 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025248
– Media: 1 Photo

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025248
– Comments: “brief flyover as I was leaving. Small, white tern with large, forked tail”

Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 07:57 by Scott Gibson
– Deer Bay Reach Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5740226,-78.2863426&ll=44.5740226,-78.2863426
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37002903
– Comments: “heard only but loud and close to road at 50km/h sign midway down hill. giving single hollow note calls in slow succession. not triplet calls of BBCU that i have had at this location in past. heard it distinctly 3-4 times.”

Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 15:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025783
– Comments: “near Lock 25, quick glimpse as it flew past. Long, black and white tail, cinnamon wings”

Barred Owl (Strix varia) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 04:56 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Yard – Bear Creek Rd, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5064687,-78.4726858&ll=44.5064687,-78.4726858
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37002257

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 13:20 by Richard Poort
– CA-Ontario-Tory Hill-West Eels Lake Road , Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.8991696,-78.1863274&ll=44.8991696,-78.1863274
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37017936

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 10:00 by Basil Conlin
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025248

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (4)
– Reported May 20, 2017 15:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37025783

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 05:44 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Elim Lodge Rd – Bear Creek, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.5066833,-78.4694934&ll=44.5066833,-78.4694934
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37002256
– Comments: “Pure male singing ‘bee-bzz-bzz’ song in overgrown pasture. Different bird then one near sandy point.”

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 11:00 by Jeff Stewart
– 621 Carveth Drive, Millbrook, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1354565,-78.4611087&ll=44.1354565,-78.4611087
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37007726
– Comments: “heard while observing Brewster’s Warbler – full intact “beee-bzzzzz” song, assuming BWWA and not another Brewsters (?)”

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 09:15 by Richard Poort
– CA-Ontario-Tory Hill-272 Fire Route 73B , Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.8914459,-78.1682448&ll=44.8914459,-78.1682448
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37004804

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 11:57 by Luke Berg
– LHT–Drummond Line to Heritage Line, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.25411,-78.209913&ll=44.25411,-78.209913
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37011943

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) (1)
– Reported May 20, 2017 09:24 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Old Keene Road Marshes, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2596835,-78.2625957&ll=44.2596835,-78.2625957
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37003942

May 202017
 

The Bald Eagle nest on Third Island on Katchewanooka Lake is in good shape. However, the tree where the nest is located has been dead now for four years. I spotted two eaglets the first week of May being fed by the parents.

Kevin and Stacey Archer, Young’s Point Road

Eagle at nest on L. Katchewanooka – May 4, 2017 – Riley Archer

Two adult eagles with chick – May 4 – L. Katchewanooka – Riley Archer

May 202017
 

We caught this hungry little Black Bear with his hand in the cookie jar over the weekend of May 6. He came back to our place multiple times after the feeders were removed and settled on picking dandelions from the yard. I may have to provide him a salary after all the rainfall we have had this spring!

Nima Taghaboni, Deer Bay, Lower Buckhorn Lake

Black Bear – May 2017 – Nima Taghaboni

Black Bear at feeder – May 2017 – Nima Taghaboni

May 202017
 

On May 4, 5 and 6, I observed these Caspian Terns on the Indian River at Keene. They were north from the bridge on County Road 2, near where the Old Mill once stood. I managed to get a few photos, although from quite a distance. They look to be two pairs in breeding plumage. I was wondering if they are becoming more common in the area as I have never seen them before.

Shawn Whalen, Keene

Note: Caspian Terns are indeed becoming much more common in the Kawarthas and may be nesting here.

Caspian Terns – Keene – May 5, 2017 – Shawn Whalen

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 202017
 

On our morning walk on 6′ Bay Rd, Buckhorn, we came upon a freshly killed (runover) snake that I had never seen before. Not being fond of snakes, but not wishing it to be mutilated by more traffic, we moved it to the shoulder of the road, and took a couple of photos of it. It would appear to be an Eastern Milksnake. The milksnake is currently listed as a Species of  Special Concern under the Ontario Endangered Species Act, 2007 and Special Concern under the federal act.

Young Eastern Milksnake – Kingsley Hubbs

May 192017
 

Date: Thu, 18 May 2017 11:48:19 -0400
From: Festival of Birds <festivalofbirds2017@gmail.com>
To: ONTBIRDS <birdalert@ontbirds.ca>
Subject: [Ontbirds] Point Pelee NP Migration Report-May 18

Warm southerly breezes greeted birders today. Incoming migrants were not reported in large numbers but there were a few good pockets. About 15 species of warbler were reported. The most numerous species of warbler reported was CANADA.

The Tip had a good group of birds including CANADA, WILSON’S, BLACKPOLL WARBLERS, SCARLET TANAGER, INDIGO BUNTING, NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD, and a number of flycatcher species including EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE and OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER. One hike leader reported three vireo species (RED-EYED, PHILADELPHIA, and WARBLING) singing in one tree.

The PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS are continuing in their attempt to nest along the Woodland Nature Trail.

Tilden Woods had CERULEAN WARBLER, ACADIAN FLYCATCHER, NORTHERN PARULA, and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO.

Further north in the Cactus Field there was another OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER.

Other YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS were spotted on Redbud Trail and Woodland Nature Trail.

Good Birding,

Festival of Birds Hike Leaders
Pete Read, Karl Konze, Todd Pepper, Justin Peter, Jean Iron, Geof Burbidge, Emma Burbidge, Ian Shanahan, Chris Earley, Chris Coultier, Dave Milsom, Dave Jolly, James Lee, Tony Beck, Bruce DiLabio, Jessica Linton, Jody Allair and Paul Pratt.

The Festival of Birds runs from May 1 – 22. For a detailed schedule visit: www.festivalofbirds.ca

For highlights and other updates follow us at www.twitter.com/PointPeleeNP

The Festival is brought to you by Parks Canada – Point Pelee National Park and the Friends of Point Pelee. Hikes are generously supported by Quest Nature Tours. Shorebird Viewing Nights are brought to you in partnership with Ontario Field Ornithologists and Essex Region Conversation Authority and Pelee Wings Nature Store.

May 192017
 

Jacob Bowman, a 15 year old Peterborough high school student, is in Regina, Saskatchewan this week at the Canada Wide Science Fair (CWSF), presenting his research on the brook trout in Harper Creek. He qualified for the trip by winning the Peterborough Regional Science Fair last month.

Jacob’s project is called “Fish or chips? Brook trout in Harper Creek”. He has shown that the northern tributary of the creek, which runs along Rye St., has the highest quality trout habitat in the Harper Creek system. This is also the section that will be most affected by expansion of Rye St. The photo below shows Jacob’s CWSF presentation materials, including: a 5-page report on his research, his display poster, and a photograph of the material on display in Regina.

CONCLUSIONS OF JACOB’S RESEARCH

North Harper Creek had all of the components necessary for brook trout residence. It had the most stable temperature range of the sampled sections. Different food sources for fish were recorded. Brook trout were regularly observed in the creek and more fish were seen there than in any other section. Some of the other sections of the creek system exceeded the thermal tolerance level for brook trout (20°C). North Harper Creek’s temperature remained well within the tolerance level year round. Years ago the creek was altered to fit the growing developments in the area. During this process a steep grade that may impede fish passage was created at the mouth of North Harper Creek. Trout in the creek appear to be disconnected from the other sections of the creek system. North Harper Creek contains a small relic population of native brook trout that are at risk from development including the Rye St. expansion. If Rye St. expansion is to proceed, brook trout in North Harper Creek may be at risk without proper management. A plan will have to be devised to accommodate the trout. An underground stream running through culverts is not survivable for brook trout (Georig et al. 2016). They would have to move to other more suitable habitat or die. A better option would be to leave the creek were it is and begin some habitat enhancement, such as tree planting. If the creek must be moved, it is critical that it intercepts groundwater sources, since brook trout require groundwater for reproduction (Meisner 1990). It is very important that this last southern Ontario stronghold of brook trout be preserved for future generations and becomes an example of good stream conservation.”

via Jeff Bowman

Jacob Bowman sampling invertebrates in Harper Creek in January, 2016 – Jeff Bowman photo

Display of Jacob Bowman’s Brook Trout research – May 2017 – Jeff Bowman photo

May 192017
 

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (2)
– Reported May 18, 2017 08:23 by Luke Berg
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36955037

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2017 07:37 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.362531,-78.2885554&ll=44.362531,-78.2885554
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36954352

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2017 08:41 by Mark Hecnar
– Peterborough–Trent University Wildlife Sanctuary Nature Area, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3486498,-78.2882738&ll=44.3486498,-78.2882738
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36959374

Lincoln’s Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (1)
– Reported May 18, 2017 05:56 by Paul Frost
– Peterborough–Omemee Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3076558,-78.3986695&ll=44.3076558,-78.3986695
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36953577

May 182017
 

My passion for nature began with turtles. Catching these wary reptiles was one of my favourite pastimes as a child. I was especially proud whenever I managed to bring home a snapping turtle, keep it for a day or two and show it off to my friends and family. I was therefore pleased to learn that the Ontario government has finally decided to ban the hunting of this increasingly rare species. This is a huge step forward for turtle conservation and a victory for science-based decision making. Like all of Ontario’s turtles, the snapping turtle cannot tolerate additional losses to its adult population. The hunt was not sustainable, especially on top of other pressures such as habitat loss and road mortalities.

Snapping Turtle digging nest on roadside (Danielle Tassie)

In late May and June, turtles are searching out nesting sites, such as the fine gravel of road shoulders. This is when people most often see turtles. However, turtle eggs stand a very poor chance of surviving the 90-day incubation period. Predators such as raccoons and skunks usually discover the nests within a matter of hours, dig up the eggs and enjoy a hearty meal. They leave behind the familiar sight of crinkled, white shells scattered around the nest area.

Roadkill, too, is a major cause of turtle mortality, especially at this time of year. Even worse, many of the turtles killed or injured are females on their way to lay eggs. Killing pregnant females not only removes reproductive adults from the population, but it also means all their potential future offspring are lost as well. Always drive carefully and keep an eye out for turtles on the road.

Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre

Sadly, numerous turtles continue to be hit by cars or injured in other ways. This is where the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre (OTCC) comes in. Located at 1434 Chemong Road in Peterborough, the OTCC has been working since 2002 to protect and conserve Ontario’s native turtles and their habitat. It is the only wildlife rehabilitation centre dedicated solely to providing medical and rehabilitative care to Ontario’s turtles.

Home to the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre, the OTCC operates a  hospital, which treats, rehabilitates and releases injured turtles. From an average of 50-80 turtles in the early years, the Centre now receives about 500 turtles each year as more people across Ontario learn about its work. The OTCC also carries out extensive research in the field and runs a comprehensive education and outreach program. The Executive and Medical Director is Dr. Sue Carstairs, who is an authorized wildlife custodian with over 20 years of experience in wildlife medicine.

Because so few turtles ever reach sexual maturity – females don’t even reproduce until the age of 18 – each adult turtle is part of an extremely important group. This is why it’s so important to rehabilitate as many injured turtles as possible – especially females – and return them to the wild. According to Dr. Carstairs, the most recent figures show that 1400 eggs are required to replace just one mother snapping turtle. However, as long as turtles can avoid threats such as road traffic, they can live and breed for a long time. It is believed that snapping turtles have a lifespan of over 100 years.

The OTCC is supported by a province-wide network of veterinarians and wildlife centres, including more than 30 different “first response centres”. Over 100 volunteers then drive the turtles from across the province to Peterborough. In this way, the “patients” are admitted to OTCC quickly for ongoing care. Once stabilized with fluids, painkillers, antibiotics, and wound management, each turtle is x-rayed to check for internal injuries and to see if the females are gravid (pregnant). If so, they are usually induced to lay their eggs.  With deceased turtles, the eggs are removed surgically. In both cases, the eggs are then moved to a nest container and incubated in the turtle nursery. Most hatchlings are quickly released in the marsh or pond closest to where their mother was found. However, babies from eggs that hatch late in the fall are kept over the winter and released in spring.

The public education facility at the OTCC on Chemong Road, in Peterborough – Drew Monkman

Because a turtle’s shell is made of bone, putting a fractured shell back together is orthopedic surgery. A number of different methods are used, depending on the type of fracture. Internal injuries, however, are the most life threatening. Like other injured animals, turtles go into shock, which means that timely care is of the essence. Other common medical interventions include repairing fractured jaws, removing fish hooks and treating everything from infections to pneumonia.

Drew Maxwell, a volunteer at the OTCC holds newly-hatched snapping turtles. The Centre treats injured turtles from around the province, many of which are injured after being hit by vehicles. – Drew Monkman

Education

Because education is the key to turtle conservation, the OTCC offers a number of carefully tailored presentations both off- and on-site. Audiences range from kindergarten students all the way to cottagers associations. Their Chemong Road location houses a 1000 square foot education centre. It is home to non-releasable education turtles, interactive displays and a great gift shop. Visitors can enjoy behind-the-scenes viewing of the hospital, the rehabilitation centre and adorable baby turtles! The education centre also includes a new outdoor area with ponds, trails and informative signs.

What you can do

1. If you come across an injured turtle, take note of the exact location where you found it. Place the animal in a plastic container with a secure lid and wash your hands. Call the OTCC at 705-741-5000. The Centre is staffed seven days a week from 8 am to 8 pm. NOTE: Never attempt to treat any sick or injured animal, no matter what it is. In the case of birds and mammals, contact a licensed Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre by going to owren-online.org

2. If you encounter an uninjured turtle in the middle of a road and traffic conditions are safe, gently move the animal in the direction it is travelling. Snappers can be coaxed across using a shovel, board or big stick. Never pick up a turtle by its tail.

3. If you know of a road that is particularly dangerous for turtles, contact your local councillor or other elected official to see if warning signs can be erected.

4. Do not dig up nests to protect the eggs. If you are concerned about predators, you can build a turtle nest cage. Instructions can be found at torontozoo.com. Search for a pdf called “Turtles on your Property”. Remember to keep an eye out for hatchlings from late August until snow. Hatchling painted turtles sometimes overwinter in the ground and appear in spring.

5. If you are a lakeside property owner, keep your shoreline as natural as possible. Leave an un-mown buffer of vegetation that extends at least 10 metres deep back from the water’s edge. Leave any fallen logs that lie on or close to shore.

6. You can help to conserve turtles (and other reptiles and amphibians) by reporting your sightings to monitoring programs such as the Ontario Reptile & Amphibian Atlas at Ontarionature.org

7. The OTCC exists primarily thanks to a team of dedicated volunteers, which assist with turtle care, outreach and fundraising. If you are interested in volunteering, visit the website or phone 705-741-5000.

Ontario’s turtles

Ontario is home to eight species of turtle, six of which can be found in the Kawarthas. The only species that are not found locally are the wood and spiny softshell turtles. No less than seven of our province’s turtles are now listed as Species at Risk.

1. Midland painted turtle: This is our most common and widespread species. It is named for the bright yellow, orange and/or red streaks on the head and neck.

2. Snapping turtle (at risk): Easily identifiable by its often massive size and the serrated edges at the rear margin of the shell, the snapping turtle is most often seen in May and June when it is nesting.

3. Blanding’s turtle (at risk): This species has a  dome-like shell and bright yellow throat. It is still quite common in the Kawarthas.

Blanding’s Turtle – Rick Stankiewicz

4. Musk turtle (at risk): This small, often algae-covered turtle, frequents shallow bays. It rarely leaves the water.

5. Map turtle (at risk): The shell of this large but wary species is covered by a network of map-like lines. The head and neck are streaked. They are often seen sunning themselves on the rocks of large lakes like Rice and Stony.

6. Spotted turtle (at risk): Small and secretive, spotted turtles have a smooth black shell with conspicuous bright yellow spots. There have only been a handful of confirmed sightings in the Kawarthas in recent years.

7. Wood turtle (at risk): This semi-terrestrial species spends most of its time on land in summer, inhabiting fields and forests near streams. Its shell looks like a piece of wood.

8. Spiny softshell turtle (at risk):  This is a highly aquatic species found mostly in the Great Lakes and in large rivers. It lacks the horny plates on its shell that most turtles have.

Ontario also has one non-native turtle, the red-eared slider, which is superficially similar to the painted turtle. It is sold in pet stores. Unfortunately, disenchanted owners continue to release sliders into the wild, where they represent a threat to native turtles.

Shell-abrate!

To celebrate the banning of the snapping turtle hunt, the OTTC will be hosting a fundraiser in Toronto on June 15. The event takes place at Torys LLP, located at 79 Wellington Street West. Tickets are $95 each, but come with a $45 tax receipt. There will be a short documentary on the Centre’s work, a silent auction, interactive displays and a chance to meet OTCC’s ambassador turtles!

To learn about all OTCC happenings such as regular open house events, visit ontarioturtle.ca.

May 172017
 

*** Species Summary:

– Great Egret (1 report)
– Sora (1 report)
– Upland Sandpiper (1 report)
– Least Sandpiper (2 reports)
– Cliff Swallow (2 reports)
– Golden-winged Warbler (2 reports)
– Blue-winged Warbler (2 reports)
– Cape May Warbler (1 report)
– Clay-colored Sparrow (1 report)

———————————————
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Needs Alert for Peterborough County.The report below shows observations of species you have not seen in Peterborough County, based on your eBird observations. View or unsubscribe to this alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN34560
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Great Egret (Ardea alba) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 08:30 by Shauna Ryner
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4180879,-78.2587266&ll=44.4180879,-78.2587266
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36932252
– Media: 3 Photos
– Comments: “Flying overhead, continued to fly over the neighboring farmer’s field.”

Sora (Porzana carolina) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 05:52 by Paul Frost
– airport road train tracks, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.25379,-78.36882&ll=44.25379,-78.36882
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36928667

Upland Sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 17:30 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Centre Line Rd Smith, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3788766,-78.3250377&ll=44.3788766,-78.3250377
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36947945
– Comments: “Sitting in field W of road. Have seen them at this location for last 3 years.”

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (5)
– Reported May 17, 2017 07:16 by Luke Berg
– 8 Line of Douro, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3831952,-78.2671595&ll=44.3831952,-78.2671595
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36928308
– Comments: “Feeding in small section of flooded field. Flushed by a tractor. ”

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (2)
– Reported May 17, 2017 17:10 by Iain Rayner
– Ptbo – Towerhill Rd – flooded field near Sobeys, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.32657,-78.3439684&ll=44.32657,-78.3439684
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36948273

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (30)
– Reported May 17, 2017 11:45 by Matthew Garvin
– PTBO – Trent University Pedestrian Bridge, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3522914,-78.293066&ll=44.3522914,-78.293066
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36946035
– Media: 4 Photos

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 14:14 by Dan Chronowic
– Trent University – East Bank – North Parking Lots, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3606019,-78.2876408&ll=44.3606019,-78.2876408
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36938523

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (2)
– Reported May 17, 2017 08:00 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough–Hubble Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.53712,-77.9193&ll=44.53712,-77.9193
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36929472

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 09:09 by Luke Berg
– Sandy Lake Pine barrens/Sedge marshes, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.659557,-77.8931522&ll=44.659557,-77.8931522
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36934766

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 05:45 by Iain Rayner
– Bridgenorth–Brumwell St., Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3830019,-78.373848&ll=44.3830019,-78.373848
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36948113
– Comments: “Singing ‘bee-bee-bee-bzzzz’ song very rapidly. After ten minutes it came to trail edge and showed well. Pure male, yellow head and breast, black eyeline, greenback, blue wings with two white wing stripes. 50yards S of trailhead.”

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) (2)
– Reported May 17, 2017 08:00 by Luke Berg
– Peterborough–Hubble Road, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.53712,-77.9193&ll=44.53712,-77.9193
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36929472

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 09:00 by Basil Conlin
– Peterborough–Dufferin Cement Pond, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3172775,-78.3001506&ll=44.3172775,-78.3001506
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36940124

Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida) (1)
– Reported May 17, 2017 14:20 by Matthew Tobey
– Cavan-Monaghan–Jones Quarter Line, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.2567769,-78.5402148&ll=44.2567769,-78.5402148
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36940832
– Media: 1 Photo
– Comments: “Singing male.”