Apr 132018
 

Click here to see a compilation of sightings updated to January, 2018 of fauna of Jack Lake (Apsley, Ontario) and its watershed.  Baseline information has been obtained from published books which delineate the distribution of various amphibians, birds, crustaceans, fishes, insects, mammals, molluscs, and reptiles. Additional information has been derived from the Jack Lake Strategic Plan, MNR records, the Ontario Herptofaunal Atlas,the Ontario Breeding Bird Atlas,and reported observations by Jack Lake residents and members of the Peterborough Field Naturalists. I am also grateful to Drew Monkman, Martin Parker,and Bob Bowles for their assistance in providing additional information from their records and archives.  Steve Kerr, Jack’s Lake Association

Blanding’s Turtle – Rick Stankiewicz

Apr 132018
 

March 1st started with a Red-Wing Blackbird singing in the tree on the east side of Wendy’s on Chemong Road. Came home from Wendy’s and a Northern Cardinal was singing in a high tree at  the condo and the first sight of the chipmunks running. Four pairs of American Robins were checking out the property. The next day, we had a Cooper’s Hawk in the tree in front of the condo, probably chipmunking! He has bee n back several times over the month. Each time, he amazes us. You can walk right under his tree and he will not move. After you leave he will be a couple of branches up in the same tree. Rather tame ! On March 3, a River Otter scooted through the property, down on the edge of the Otonabee. The following day was the return of our two pairs of what might be Brant geese. I can tell them by their odd honk, more so than by colour. They come in the early part of March, stay a day or two on the river and then head north. They then do a fly over around Thanksgiving. Quite consistent in their time of coming and their time of going.  Gord Young, Armour Road, Peterborough

N.B. If these were indeed Brant, it would be a very rare sighting indeed – especially a pair of birds and so early in the spring. When we see Brant here – which is not often – it’s typically in mid-May or in November and usually as a flock simply flying over.  D.M.

Red-winged Blackbird – Karl Egressy