Nov 302017
 

I thought you might be interested in loon observations which were recorded on Jack’s Lake during the 2017 season.  The results are based on  four lake-wide surveys as well as numerous other random observations. A total of 37 volunteers participated in the 2017 program.  Jack’s Lake Association volunteers have participated in the Canada Lakes Loon Survey since its inception in 1982. Despite high water levels during the nesting period, we believe that 5-6 loon pairs nested successfully and produced a total of 8 young-of-the-year.  As of a week ago, several large juveniles were still present on the lake. Click here to read the full report.  Steve Kerr

Common loon chick-sept-20-2016-carl-welbourne

Nesting loon on Otonabee River – May 31, 2016 – Jacob Rodenburg

 

Nov 282017
 

I am a PhD student at Trent University studying wild turkey populations in the Peterborough area. More specifically, I study wild turkey social structure and behaviour. Part of my research is to investigate the usefulness of platforms such as eBird and iNaturalist in estimating wild turkey population size.

I am running a pilot project this winter in Peterborough County and am requesting that folks submit wild turkey sightings by either adding observations to eBird or by submitting photos of any flocks seen to the Peterborough Wild Turkey Count project on iNaturalist (you’ll need to join the project first). You can add observations on your computer by following either of the links below, or through the eBird or iNaturalist mobile apps.

eBird: http://ebird.org/

iNaturalist: https://www. inaturalist.org/projects/peterborough-wild-turkey-count

On either platform, the most important information to include is a) where you saw the wild turkey(s), and b) how many wild turkeys you saw. We are especially interested in observations submitted between December 1st, 2017 and March 31st, 2018. Eventually, I hope to expand this project and explore whether citizen science platforms can be applied to estimate wild turkey population size for larger areas, such as province of Ontario – so stay tuned! Thank you in advance for any and all wild turkey observations you’re able to contribute this winter. I am hoping to gather as many observations as possible, so please spread the word!

Happy sighting!

Jenn Baici   jenniferbaici@trentu.ca

Wild Turkeys – Wasyl Bakowsky

Nov 202017
 

Red-throated Loon (Gavia stellata) (1)
– Reported Nov 19, 2017 12:42 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Rice Lake–Pengelly Landing, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “basic adult, around 400-500 m directly S of landing”

Red-necked Grebe. The grebe in the lower right is in winter plumage.

Horned Grebe (Podiceps auritus) (3)
– Reported Nov 19, 2017 12:42 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Rice Lake–Pengelly Landing, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1289379,-78.3067542&ll=44.1289379,-78.3067542
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40598643

Horned Grebe in winter plumage – Wikimedia

Nov 182017
 

The news about the American Chestnut trees that I have been bringing along up near Kinmount for the last 15 years is not good, I’m afraid. First: None of the nuts I planted last Fall sprouted so I had no new seedlings to plant this year. Second: I think because we had such a cold and wet Spring, only one of my three trees produced blossoms. Being dioecious (separate male and female trees), this meant there was virtually no hope of producing viable nuts this Summer, unless there are surviving American Chestnut trees nearby. Third: I hope it was due to a late frost but the new growth of leaves on all three of my trees exhibited noticeable deformation, although the remainder of the trees remained healthy-looking until they dropped their leaves. I’m hopeful that this isn’t a symptom of that devastating blight.
I am happy to report though that we saw bats at our cabin regularly through the Summer. I would say that their numbers are coming back up there. We also saw quite a few Monarch butterflies; more than in the past several Summers. We have never seen so many Moose as this summer: Two siblings (I presume) together on a game camera in the Spring, one big bull Moose in September and another, different bull Moose just a couple of weeks ago. Unfortunately, only two days after we saw the first bull Moose in our meadow, huge rack and all, my wife had a collision with him on Crystal Lake Road. Miraculously, and thankfully, she was completely unhurt, although the car was extensively damaged. The only other bit of good news coming from that is that the Moose ran off into the woods, apparently unhurt. The Moose we caught on camera a couple of weeks ago was younger, with a smaller rack and he appeared healthy.
We saw a Quail crossing Fire Route 397, and I believe they are considered endangered in Ontario now. For the first time ever we captured a Pine Marten (I believe) on a game camera. We also caught many does, a few bucks, several foxes, turkeys, raccoons, porcupines, rabbits, coyotes/wolves/coywolves . . . and a hunter trespassing on our property, shotgun in hand, who stole one of our game cameras. As always, notifying the police is a waste of time. He better not have shot one of our quail, or anything else for that matter.

Michael Doran, Peterborough

Pine Marten – Gord Belyea

American Chestnut leaves and nuts (Wikimedia)

Nov 142017
 

I sent you a note about this time last year about a small flock of Sandhill Cranes passing over Lakefield. Well, this year they have been joined by some friends. At about 2:30 this afternoon, November 17, about 4 flocks of the size of the group in the picture passed over Lakefield, some calling with the deep rolling kr-r-r-oo as described in an old Peterson guide book. One big flock circled about for awhile south of us – probably up over the Lakefield quarry – until it reformed into two or three smaller flocks and then they followed a couple of groups that passed about 10 minutes earlier and seemed to be heading west to northwest. There were probably over 200 birds in total…. a wonderful sight.  Bill Buddle

Sandhill Cranes – November 17, 2017 – Lakefield – Bill Buddle

 

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
– Reported Nov 14, 2017 09:58 by Travis Cameron
– Lakefield (General), Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Flying west over County Road 29 ~250m south of Maples Corners.”

An immature Snowy Owl in flight – probably a female (Karl Egressy)

 

We are witnessing scores of Mourning Doves this fall here near Bailieboro, ON. We’re in the country, so we’re used to these birds, but this is unbelievable. They are in at least two flocks. I counted 30 in one. And they eat berries; just ask my car. L. Harries

Mourning Dove – Karl Egressy

 

Here’s a picture of three Trumpeter Swans (two adults and one juvenile) that I photographed on Upper Buckhorn Lake on Nov. 12, 2017.  Derry Fairweather

Trumpeter Swans – November 12, 2017 – Buckhorn Lake – Derry Fairweather

 

I had a Yellow-rumped Warbler at my feeder yesterday, November 12. Hopefully , the seeds will sustain/attract it until December 1st for the official winter bird list! So far, the resident Red-bellied Woodpecker has ignored the suet and chooses the feeder seeds every time. It is certainly a different behaviour for a woodpecker. Michael Gillespie, Keene

Yellow-rumped Warbler at feeder – Nov. 28, 2014 Franmor Dr. Ptbo – Sue Prentice

 

I found this lovely Witch Hazel blooming in a wild area of Ecology Park today, November 12. It could so easily be overlooked! I read that they bloom at this time of year in order to take advantage of the lack of competition for the few flies and moths that are still active. We did see both that day.   Sue Paradisis

Witch Hazel 2 – Ecology Park – Nov. 13, 2017 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

Witch Hazel – Ecology Park – Nov. 13, 2017 – Sue Paradisis

 

 

 

Nov 122017
 

Northern Shoveler (Spatula clypeata) (1)
– Reported Nov 11, 2017 10:04 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “male”

American Wigeon (Mareca americana) (1)
– Reported Nov 11, 2017 10:04 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Lakefield–Sewage Lagoons, Peterborough, Ontario
– Comments: “male”

Surf Scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) (1)
– Reported Nov 12, 2017 09:11 by Matthew Garvin
– South Chemong Lake off Arnott Rd., Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Female/immature type. Diving near shore. Great looks. Large bulky beak, white crescent at base of beak and white spot rear of eye. No white wing patches.”

Male and female Surf Scoter – Omar Runolfsson

Black Scoter (Melanitta americana) (4)
– Reported Nov 05, 2017 15:57 by Iain Rayner
– Pigeon Lake–Sandy Point, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Female type. All black with pale cheeks and stubby bills. swimming with GRSC”

Black Scoter – Crossley ID Guide of Eastern Birds – Wikimedia

Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) (1)
– Reported Nov 05, 2017 14:45 by John Bick
– Sandy Point Bay, Pigeon Lake, Peterborough, Ontario
– Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.4989386,-78.4914737&ll=44.4989386,-78.4914737
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40328843
– Comments: “Gray coloured large grebe with long neck and long bill, pale on side of face. Diving in grebe-fashion.”

Red-necked Grebe on Otonabee – Tom Northey

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) (3)
– Reported Nov 06, 2017 07:22 by Donald A. Sutherland
– Peterborough–Trent Rotary Rail Trail, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:

Snow Bunting (photo by Serena Formenti)

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) (11)
– Reported Nov 05, 2017 14:45 by John Bick
– Sandy Point Bay, Pigeon Lake, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
Checklist:
– Comments: “Feeding on seeds on ground near dock at Pigeon Lake Campers’ Resort. Took flight often showing white wing patches. All in winter plumage with rusty brown heads and eye patches, streaked backs.”

Snow Bunting (from Crossley ID Guide)

Nov 122017
 

Date: Sunday, 12 Nov 2017 11:47:24 -0500
From: Ron Tozer  rtozer@vianet.ca
To: ontbirds  birdalert@ontbirds.ca
Subject: [Ontbirds] Algonquin Park Birding Report: early November

Click here to visit up-to-date Ontbirds Archive

As of today, November 12, there is a heavy covering of snow on the ground and a few shallow ponds and small lakes along the Highway 60 Corridor are ice-covered. However, it is still fall even if it felt like winter on a couple of minus 15-degree mornings this week. There were fresh Bear tracks in the snow on the Visitor Centre parking lot yesterday, for example. Recent locations for observations of the boreal specialties are as follows:

Spruce Grouse: Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Mizzy Lake Trail rail bed section

Black-backed Woodpecker: Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road, Mizzy Lake Trail rail bed section

Gray Jay: Opeongo Road, Mizzy Lake Trail rail bed section

Boreal Chickadee: Mizzy Lake Trail rail bed section

The abundant cones on most conifer species in Algonquin appear to have been significantly affected by the sustained and unprecedented period of hot days in the latter half of September. The cones opened and limited inspection suggests that many (most?) of the seeds may have been released. It remains to be seen how this will affect finch numbers this winter.

There have been recent observations of nearly all of the expected finches, but in low numbers.

Pine Grosbeak: sightings of single birds on November 4 and 11.

Purple Finch: regular in low numbers.

Red Crossbill: regular in low numbers; four seen almost daily this week at the Visitor Centre. Recordings of larger-billed Type 1 and smaller-billed Type 3 confirmed by Matt Young (Cornell) recently.

White-winged Crossbill: low numbers present, but reported less frequently than Red Crossbill.

Common Redpoll: observations of one to four birds on October 20 and 21 but no reports since.

Pine Siskin: low numbers but likely the most numerous finch currently; 40 at Visitor Centre on November 8.

American Goldfinch: regular in low numbers; 17 at Visitor Centre on November 10.

Evening Grosbeak: one to three at Visitor Centre this week.

Good birding.

Ron Tozer, Algonquin Park Naturalist (retired), Dwight, ON

DIRECTIONS:

Gray Jay -Tom Northey Algonquin Park – March 2014

Algonquin Provincial Park is 2.5 hours north of Peterborough via Highways 28, 62, 127 and 60. Kilometre markers along Highway 60 in the Park go from the West Gate (km 0) to near the East Gate (km 56). The Visitor Centre exhibits, bookstore and restaurant at km 43 are open on weekends from 9 am to 5 pm in winter. The Visitor Centre is also open on weekdays from 9 am to 4 pm with limited services, including self-serve hot and cold beverages plus snacks available in the restaurant. Get your park permit and Information Guide (with a map of birding locations mentioned here) at the East Gate or the West Gate. Locations are also described here.

Displaying Spruce Grouse – Tom Northey

Pine Grosbeak – Wikimedia

Nov 022017
 

Red-shouldered Hawk (lineatus Group) (Buteo lineatus [lineatus Group]) (1)
– Reported Nov 04, 2017 10:32 by Luke Berg
– Luke’s Yard, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40302920
– Comments: “Adult at 1453h. ”

Red-shouldered Hawk (Brendan Boyd)

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
– Reported Nov 02, 2017 09:20 by Iain Rayner
– PTBO – Robinson Place, Peterborough, Ontario
Map:
– Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40260768

Peregrine Falcon (Wikimedia photo)