May 012013
 

Today I walked my dogs from about 6 – 7:30 p.m. at a friends farm in Douro. Highlights were: Eastern Kingbird, FOY (first of the year) Yellow Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, FOY American Bittern, Wilson’s Snipe, FOY Green Heron, and FOY adult male Eastern Towhee.

Observer: Luke Berg

American Bittern - by Don Pettypiece

American Bittern – by Don Pettypiece

May 012013
 

In the past week at Beavermead and Ecology Park, I have seen the Worm-eating Warbler (seen by many) , Buffleheads, an unidentified grebe, an Osprey, a Northern Leopard Frog, an Eastern Phoebe, a Hairy Woodpecker, Song Sparrows, Northern Cardinals, Red-Winged Blackbirds, White-breasted Nuthatches, a courting pair of Northern Flickers, Red-eared Sliders (turtle) and Painted Turtles (about 7 all together), Bloodroot and Coltsfoot (both in bloom), Mourning Cloak butterflies, a Questionmark butterfly, a breeding pair of Yellow-Bellied Sapsuckers and today I saw 5 Muskies (they come into the creek to spawn in the spring, I think). Also, I believe I heard a Wilson’s Snipe on Monday night.

Wilson's Snipe- by Greg Piasetzki

Wilson’s Snipe- by Greg Piasetzki

 

Observer: Catherine Paradisis

May 012013
 

This morning I walked my dogs at the Pencier trail at the Trent Nature Area.  Highlights: 7 Northern Waterthrush, 1 singing Palm Warbler, a flock of 5 adult male Yellow-rumped Warblers, and 1 singing Black-and-white Warbler.
Observer: Luke Berg

Yellow-rumped Warbler (male) - Jeff Keller

Yellow-rumped Warbler (male) – Jeff Keller

May 012013
 

I heard my first American Toad of the spring this morning. It was “trilling” from the second catchment basin northeast of Chemong Road along the Parkway Trail. Northern Leopard Frogs were making their snoring call in the first basin. Other species along the Trail this morning included Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Blue Jays (small flocks migrating), Song Sparrows, Red-winged Blackbirds, Northern Cardinals and Mallards (in the catchment basins.)  The willows are in full bloom right now and attracting multitudes of bees. Coltsfoot, too, is common around the catchment basins. At first glance, Coltsfoot looks like a Dandelion, but you’ll see that there are no leaves. The scaly stem is quite different as well.

American Toad singing

American Toad singing

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Observer: Drew Monkman

May 012013
 

Today I was photographing some tulips in Peterborough when a bee-fly, probably Bombylius major, came to nectar on the flowers. I managed to get some pictures.  (Note: Bee-flies are amazing creatures. Although they are actually flies (i.e. only have two wings) they have evolved to mimic bees. This allows them to get close to the bees’ nests where they “flick” their eggs onto or near the bee larvae. The eggs then hatch and the grubs parasitize the developing bees. Sometimes the eggs are just left on flowers where the bees pick them up inadvertently and end up carrying them back to the nest – D. Monkman)

Observer: Margo Hughes

Large Bee-fly - by Margo Hughes

Large Bee-fly – by Margo Hughes